Tropical Paradise Co Ltd (TPL.mu) Q32019 Interim Report

first_imgTropical Paradise Co Ltd (TPL.mu) listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius under the Tourism sector has released it’s 2019 interim results for the third quarter.For more information about Tropical Paradise Co Ltd (TPL.mu) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Tropical Paradise Co Ltd (TPL.mu) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Tropical Paradise Co Ltd (TPL.mu)  2019 interim results for the third quarter.Company ProfileTropical Paradise Co Limited  engages in the tourism and leisure sector where it operates hotels in Mauritius. Headquartered in Moka, Mauritius, the company operates the Labourdonnais Waterfront Hotel, Le Suffren Hotel & Marina, Hennessy Park Hotel, and Port Chambly Hotel. Tropical Paradise Co Limited (Ordinary) is listed on the Stock Exchange of Mauritius.last_img read more

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Birmingham charities to benefit from local recycling incentive

first_img About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Smurfit Kappa Recycling and Birmingham City Council are encouraging residents of Birmingham to recycle more this month and raise money for local charities.If residents can recycle more paper and card than they did in January 2007, Smurfit Kappa Recycling will make a donation to the Lord Mayor of Birmingham’s charities which include the Birmingham Scout Association, Birmingham Guide Association, Edward’s Trust and St Mary’s Hospice.‘Mixed paper’ waste such as gift catalogues, Christmas cards, envelopes, wrapping paper and mince pie boxes can be recycled at Smurfit Kappa Recycling’s paper and card banks and through the Council’s kerbside collection scheme. All material is then transported directly to the local Smurfit Kappa paper mill where it is recycled.Dave Cowing, commercial manager for Smurfit Kappa Recycling in Birmingham said: “With the festive period accounting for three million tonnes of the UK’s annual waste, we are keen to ensure that as much as possible is diverted from landfill sites and into our paper mill where it can be recycled into packaging materials to protect new products on their journey from factory or farm to homes.”Smurfit Kappa Recycling recycles 500,000 tonnes of paper and card a year at its mills in Kent and Birmingham.www.smurfitkappa-recycling.com Birmingham charities to benefit from local recycling incentive AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: corporate  41 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 21 January 2008 | Newslast_img read more

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Waterboys play Limerick

first_imgNewsBreaking newsEntertainmentMusicWaterboys play LimerickBy Eric Fitzgerald – December 3, 2014 857 Advertisement WhatsApp MIKE Scott and the Waterboys will play Limerick for the first time in over 10 years bringing a show with a new line-up playing in public for the first time. The show promises to reflect every part of the band’s 30 year career. The Waterboys were formed in 1983 by Mike Scott and found their audience with their “Big Music”, powerful live performances and majestic rock albums such as A Pagan Place and This Is The Sea, which included their biggest hit The Whole Of The Moon.  After the recruitment of Irish fiddle maestro Steve Wickham, still part of the line-up, the band created their million-selling Fisherman’s Blues album in Ireland on which Scott’s songwriting was merged with traditional Irish music and country.  Since then The Waterboys have continued to make records and have matured into one of the finest live acts.   The Waterboys’ new album Modern Blues will be released on January 19. The album was recorded in Nashville, produced by Mike Scott and mixed by Bob Clearmountain. Modern Blues is an, “electric, soulful, bold, freewheeling rock’n’roll record with a skinful of killer new songs, some of which have been premiered live over the past few years.”  Ralph Salmins, a mainstay on drums for the past four years, appears alongside the talismanic Steve Wickham, who weaves fuzz fiddle spells on several tracks. Fresh to the ranks are Memphis keyboard player “Brother” Paul Brown and David Hood, legendary bassist from Muscle Shoals, Alabama. Additional lead guitars are played by 2013 US Waterboy Jay Barclay and Austin soul guitarist Zach Ernst. Guest backing vocalists include southern soul legend Don Bryant.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Modern Blues Track listing:1. Destinies Entwined 5.452. November Tale 5.183. Still A Freak 3.594. I Can See Elvis 5.475. The Girl Who Slept For Scotland 4.566. Rosalind (You Married The Wrong Guy) 5.097. Beautiful Now 3.588. Nearest Thing To Hip 5.429. Long Strange Golden Road 10.23 Linkedin Previous article40 new jobs on the way at Element SixNext articleLeading Armies in aid of Vincent De Paul Christmas Appeal Eric Fitzgeraldhttp://www.limerickpost.ieEric writes for the Entertainment Pages of Limerick Post Newspaper and edits the music blog www.musiclimerick.com where you can watch and listen to music happening in the city and beyond. Facebook Print Email Twitter TAGSwaterboysWhole Of The Moon last_img read more

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Strike action more likely at MPE as union claims new owners are refusing to…

first_img WhatsApp Homepage BannerNews Strike action more likely at MPE as union claims new owners are refusing to negotiate Facebook Google+ Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic The UNITE Trade Union has written to the new owners of Maydown Precision Engineering in Derry, threatening industrial action and possible legal proceedings.The Union’s Regional Officer Philip Oakes says MPE’s new owner Schivo NI have failed to honour existing agreements with workers, and are refusing to engage with the union.He says initially, managementindicated that only 15 jobs would be lost, but they now understand that up to 50 positions may go.Philip Oakes says the process has already started……Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/unitempe.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Google+ Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Twittercenter_img Facebook Pinterest Previous articleJason Days wins US PGA title – McIlroy loses top rankingNext articleLYIT President says more Level 8 places are on offer this year admin By admin – August 17, 2015 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North WhatsApp Twitter Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan fire Pinterestlast_img read more

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TAC gets state arts council grant

first_img By The Penny Hoarder Published 7:30 pm Wednesday, December 29, 2010 The Troy Arts Council has been awarded a $2,400 grant from the Alabama State Council on the Arts to bring the Kremlin Orchestra to Troy in February.The TAC grant was one of 170 grants totaling $1,981,920 the state arts council awarded at its September meeting. The grants awarded will support arts in education, folk art, community, literature, performing and visual arts programs.John Jinright, TAC presenter chair, expressed appreciation to the state arts council for its continuing support. The Kremlin Orchestra has earned national and international recognition as one of Russia’s leading ensembles.“The orchestra is made up of some of Russia’s finest young string players,” Jinright said. “It has carved a niche for itself under the creative baton of its founder and music director Misha Rachlevsky. “The orchestra’s warmth and high energy create addictive performances that its audiences will remember for a long time. We are very fortunate to have this orchestra come to Troy.” By Jaine Treadwell Email the author Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day TAC gets state arts council grant Latest Stories Skip You Might Like Jones leaves touch on rec department Parks and Rec director Dan Smith poses with Gail Jones during her retirement reception. Gail Jones has been an icon… read more “This grant makes it possible for us to bring an outstanding chamber orchestra to Troy,” Jinright said. “Without the support of the Alabama State Council on the Arts, this would not be possible.”The “From Russia with Love” concert will be performed at the Claudia Crosby Theater on the campus of Troy University on Valentine’s Day, Feb. 14, 2011.“We have asked that much of the concert be focused toward this special day,” Jinright said. Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Book Nook to reopen Sponsored Content Print Article The Kremlin Orchestra presents concerts and festivals in Moscow and tours regularly in North America, South America, Europe and the Far East. The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Around the WebDoctor: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Health VideosIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthMost 10 Rarest Skins for FortniteTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

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Coronavirus live updates: WHO warns against ‘immunity passports’

first_imgmrtom-uk/iStockBy WILLIAM MANSELL, ABC News(NEW YORK) — A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed nearly 200,000 people worldwide.More than 2.8 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some governments are hiding the scope of their nations’ outbreaks.Since the first cases were detected in China in December, the United States has become the worst-affected country, with more than 905,000 diagnosed cases and at least 51,949 deaths. Here’s how the news is developing Saturday. All times Eastern:6:33 a.m.: WHO warns against ‘immunity passports’In response to some governments suggesting that detection of COVID-19 antibodies could serve as the basis of an “immunity passport” that would allow people to travel or return to work assuming they are protected from contracting again or spreading the coronavirus, the World Health Organization issued a warning that said such a program is not backed up by scientific evidence.“There is currently no evidence that people who have recovered from COVID-19 and have antibodies are protected from a second infection,” the WHO said in a statement Friday.No study, as of April 24, has evaluated whether the presence of antibodies guarantees immunity to subsequent infection of COVID-19 in humans, the organization said.The WHO said people who have tested positive might be prone to ignore public health advice and “increase the risks of continued transmission” to other people.The warning comes as some states in the U.S. look to ease social distancing restrictions and to let some nonessential businesses reopen.States like Texas, Georgia, Oklahoma, while all taking a different approach, are now reopening businesses to jumpstart their economies. Georgia, despite criticism from President Donald Trump, will allow many businesses to reopen this week, including tattoo parlors, movie theaters, bowling alleys and more.5:20 a.m.: 138 inmates in Colorado prison test positiveAt least 138 inmates at the Sterling Correctional Facility in Colorado have tested positive for COVID-19, according to the Department of Corrections, and that number will likely rise soon.“Given the insidious nature of this virus, we had suspected that despite seeing a relatively low number of inmates with symptoms, the number of positives was potentially much higher,” Department of Corrections Executive Director Dean Williams said in a statement Friday. “That is exactly why we conducted this large scale testing, so that we can continue to isolate, monitor and treat any inmates who were positive and try to mitigate the spread to others inside the facility.”At least 473 symptomatic and asymptomatic inmates were tested for the novel coronavirus last week. Of those, only 255 results have been returned; 138 were positive, 104 were negative, 12 were inconclusive and one was unsatisfactory. The state is still waiting for the results of 218 inmate tests.Inside the prison, inmates are largely kept in their cells to help slow the spread of the virus, the state said. Outside of showering or using the restroom, they remain in their cells. All meals and medications are delivered to inmates during the quarantine.The facility previously had eight inmates that tested positive.Prisons across the U.S. are struggling to contain the spread of COVID-19 inside their walls. At the Rikers Island jail in New York City, 367 inmates have tested positive for the virus while 235 detainees in custody at Cook County Jail in Illinois are currently positive for COVID-19.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Tiny Alaskan village tries to manage influx of commercial fishermen amid COVID-19

first_imgKatherine Carscallen’s livelihood depends on seasonal sockeye salmon fishing in Bristol Bay, Alaska, but she fears COVID-19 may cause history to repeat itself. – (Courtesy Katherine Carscallen)By KAYNA WHITWORTH, CONNOR BURTON and JENNA HARRISON, ABC News(BRISTOL BAY, Alaska) — “It’s just how the earth is supposed to be,” says third-generation commercial fishing boat captain Katherine Carscallen. She’s talking about her homeland, Bristol Bay, Alaska. Every June and July, more than half of the world’s supply of sockeye salmon are pulled from these waters.It sounds excessive, but it’s not; in a highly regulated practice, thousands of fish are left to return home and spawn, allowing the industry to support the region for generations.The yearly salmon fishery brings in an estimated $200 million in direct revenue to the community of Bristol Bay, says Norm Van Vactor, president and CEO of Bristol Bay Economic Development Corporation.“Overall, it’s a multi-billion dollar fishery,” he says of the thousands of fisherman who come from all over the world to fish for salmon. On average, 10,000 fishermen come each year — but oftentimes that number is upwards of 15,000. In addition, 6,000 fish processing workers also descend on the tiny community.Fishing has dangers of its own, but this year the peril is invisible. The isolated community of Bristol Bay has only recorded three cases of COVID-19 as of June 20, and now many of those arriving could be carrying the deadly virus. As a result, some local fishermen wanted this year’s fishery to be canceled.“There’s no doubt that this is putting the region at risk. And if it was our choice, it likely wouldn’t be happening,” says Carscallen.The commercial fishery hasn’t even begun and it’s already seeing an outbreak at a fish processing plant. On June 22, 12 of the 52 workers screened tested positive. They were immediately isolated.Bristol Bay is home to only 6,500 people, and most are Alaskan natives who feel their safety is at risk if the fishery were to commence.“The vast majority of our economy is the heart of the commercial fishery,” said Alannah Hurley, executive director of United Tribes of Bristol Bay. “It was a hard decision to make but it was a necessary one.”For the locals, it’s their land — but not their call.In an official COVID-19 Health Mandate sent out by his office in April, Gov. Mike Dunleavy laid out guidelines for independent commercial fishing vessels to follow while the industry begins its fishing season.“The State of Alaska acknowledges the importance of our commercial fishing fleet to our economy and lifestyle as Alaskans,” the statement said. “In order to ensure a safe, productive fishing season this year, while still protecting Alaskan communities to the maximum extent possible from the spread of the virus, the State is establishing standardized protective measures to be followed by all independent commercial fishing vessels operating in Alaskan waters and ports.”Dr. Catherine Hyndman, clinical director of Bristol Bay Area Health Corporation, says, “testing should be mandatory, and people should get tested on a number of occasions.”The first planeloads of fisherman began arriving June 1. Carscallen picked up her uncle who comes every year. Wearing a mask, he hopped into the bed of her pickup truck. She dropped him off at a converted shipping container, where he plans to disappear, ready his nets in solitude, and then hit the water with a small crew.A 14-day quarantine is mandated by the state but not enforced, and testing is available. Hurley tells ABC News that they are seeing people “completely disregard quarantine and safety measures.”“It’s all based on the honor system,” said Van Vactor. “There’s no follow-up, there are no real penalties in place if you don’t comply. There’s no way they’re even checking to see if you’re complying.”Vactor said he and others have been “banging their heads against the wall for months,” asking the state for mandated pre-quarantine testing, post-quarantine testing and help enforcing the rules.“To date, the state has virtually done none of that,” he said.For those who decide to get tested, Hyndman says she has seen a few cases where fishermen initially test negative “and then 10 or 12 days into their quarantine they test positive after a second test.”One of the largest fishing companies in the United States, Trident Seafoods, told ABC News in a statement that they have implemented their own stringent protocols throughout all operations. A representative tells ABC News they “require 14-day, monitored quarantines in hotels with security guards that we provide for all of our Alaska shore plant and large vessel workforce, with PCR testing before safe secure transfer to the destination work site.” They also offer daily health screenings.Once the fish are caught, they are sent directly to fish processing plants in Bristol Bay. Here workers prepare the fish, freeze them and then send them all over the world. A former processing plant manager himself, Vactor says in a typical year the common cold is a huge problem. “Now you interject this? It’s definitely very, very concerning,” he said.In a processing plant, thousands of workers stand shoulder-to-shoulder working 16- to 20-hour shifts, eating together in mess halls and then bunking together — in some cases, six to eight people to a room. Vactor wonders how a virus like COVID-19 can possibly be kept from spreading.“There were a lot of other things that used to keep me up at night, Vactor said, “but boy, this one is a pretty daunting task.”If the concern among locals is high, it may be because many of the village elders were raised by orphans of the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918. A food processing worker brought the flu into the community, and “It decimated the population,” says Hurley.Many of the people who are asking that this year’s fishery be canceled are direct descendants.Hurley also fears that the local community is extremely susceptible and that the virus would quickly spread out of control. The largest hospital in the region has just 12 beds, and anyone who gets sick is transported by Medevac to Anchorage for care. As a result, arriving fishermen are being encouraged to get Medevac insurance.Carscallen has been on a boat since the day after she was born, and began running her own crew at age 13. For her, the fishery is all she knows and she now fears her way of life could be threatened; it’s not a question of whether the coronavirus will hit her region, but how bad it will be.“I really just hope we’re not forgotten about once the spread happens,” she said.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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AN ALASKAN CHRISTMAS STORY

first_imgBy Susan Stamper BrownAmericans need a good dose of Christmas.As a nation, we are desperately lost, emotionally broken, spiritually deprived and headed for the same fate our “unadoptable” Alaskan husky dog was before my husband and I welcomed her into our home.It’s been four years since we adopted Kenai, a skeletal ball of nerves wrapped in cinnamon colored fur with spotty white “socks.”Obviously abused, she had zero trust in humans and no confidence in herself. Animal control officers almost deemed her unadoptable.She was literally scared of her shadow, fearing door entryways and basically everything inside our home, including us. She parked herself on our new chair in the living room corner. For three months she ate, drank and napped when she wasn’t staring at us and only left her perch when we’d take her outside to walk and potty.One cold and snowy winter night with near zero visibility, we feared this one-sided love affair had come to an end when she got away and bolted up and around our mountain. The more we called, chased and searched, the deeper into the woods and higher she climbed. Though we were forced to give up our search for the night, we refused to give up hope.Miraculously, she found her way back to our yard in the wee hours of an Alaska winter morning’s deep darkness. Despite our loving calls, she was afraid to come inside until we came up with a far-fetched idea to coax her inside walking our tiny terrier nicknamed “the rabbit killer” (for reasons not worthy of this column) on a leash nearby in hopes that she would follow.She did.Although we loved Kenai deeply and wanted desperately for her to come inside, we were at a complete loss on how to effectively communicate that message. Kenai needed an intermediary. A conciliator. A go-between. In our terrier, Kenai found a canine compatriot to communicate “There’s nothing to fear, come near, welcome home” in a way she could understand.Four years later, Kenai’s doing great. She’ll always be a little quirky, and full-blown crazy sometimes if something snaps in her head and sets her off. She’s slowly learning to do normal things like eat her food on the floor and play with toys if no one is watching.She loves to go for rides, begs for us to pet her, and even dares to bark now, with the cutest, most feminine and sweet bark you’ve ever heard.We added another sled dog to our pack, a well-balanced rescue that came with an amazing story all his own that I’ll share one day when the time is right. He’s rubbing off on Kenai in all the right ways. As for our terrier, well, she’s moved on from rabbits to shrews. I guess we should be grateful.With happy ears and a look of contentment on her face, Kenai’s resting in her now-worn out leather chair as I write.I think back to that winter morning years ago and the extremely loved shell of a dog curled up in that chair. I realize I learned something big about God’s love that day. An Alaskan Christmas story all my own.God sought us before we knew Him, reached out to us before we trusted Him and loved us before we knew how to love him back. He sent someone like us… an intermediary… Jesus, to communicate his message in a way we could understand. Through Jesus’ birth, eventual death, and resurrection, we come to understand (as much as is humanly possible) that God’s love for us is so deep and wide and high that we cannot escape his notice ‒ even when we try.“For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given: and the government shall be on his shoulder: and his name shall be called Wonderful, Counselor, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace.” (Isaiah 9:6)FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Inter Link loss but brighter outlook

first_imgCake company Inter Link Foods has announced it will not now meet market forecasts for the financial year ending 5 May, 2007.The supplier said it will make a loss after exceptional costs, but before goodwill amortisation.However, with internal restructuring complete and the new central distribution arrangements operating effectively, Inter Link said that it expected 2007/8 to be materially better than the current year.last_img

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Chester Bennington Of Linkin Park Has Died

first_imgIt is with heavy hearts that we report that Linkin Park lead singer Chester Bennington died today at the age of 41. Law enforcement officials stated that his death was ruled a suicide by hanging. His body was discovered in a private residence in Palos Verdes Estates, CA earlier this morning. Chester was currently married, and had 6 children from two marriages. The singer had spoken publicly about his personal demons, including years of struggling with drug and alcohol abuse.Earlier this year, when Chris Cornell committed suicide, Chester and the rest of Linkin Park paid tribute to their fallen friend with a heartfelt rendition of their track “One More Light” on Jimmy Kimmel Live. He also sang at Cornell’s funeral. Chris would have celebrated his 53rd birthday today. You can watch Chester’s haunting tribute to Cornell below:Linkin Park first achieved widespread success with their 2000 debut album Hybrid Theory, which was certified Diamond by the RIAA in 2005, selling more than 10 million copies largely thanks to the interplay between Bennington’s visceral, seething-yet-beautiful nu metal vocals and MC Mike Shinoda‘s hip hop verses. In a 2003 countdown special, MTV2 named Linkin Park the sixth-greatest band of the music video era. The band also made notable strides in crossing genres within popular music, famously collaborating with hip-hop superstar Jay Z for their 2004 mashup album Collision Course, as well as several other artists from various genres on subsequent remix albums Reanimation and Recharge.The band’s seventh original studio album, One More Light, was released this May, and they are currently in the midst of a 54-date world tour featuring opening acts like Sum 41, Snoop Dogg, Wu Tang Clan, and more. No announcement has been made yet regarding the upcoming scheduled shows, though it’s hard to imagine the band performing without Bennington’s distinctively entrancing vocals.You can watch the classic music videos for the two biggest hits from Linkin Park’s debut album, “Crawling” and “In The End,” both of which earned notably extended stints atop the TRL Top Ten video countdown, the most prestigious barometer for music videos throughout the late 90’s and early 00’s:“In The End”“Crawling”Our thought are with Bennington’s family and friends. Rest easy, Chester.[h/t – TMZ]last_img read more

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