Groves will face Froch in Manchester

first_imgGeorge Groves’ world title challenge against Carl Froch will take place at the Manchester Arena on 23 November.Nottingham’s IBF super-middleweight champion Froch, 36, has long been mooted as a possible opponent for the unbeaten Groves, 25, who is currently Commonwealth champion and has also held the British title.Groves, from Hammersmith, was initially expected to take on WBO title holder Robert Stieglitz ahead of a possible showdown with Froch next year.But he was installed as the IBF’s mandatory challenger and Eddie Hearn, who promotes both men, subsequently revealed that talks were taking place with a view to the pair meeting sooner rather than later. And last month Hearn confirmed that the fight would be taking place before the end of the year.Froch is also billed as the WBA champion, a title he effectively shares with American star Andre Ward, who beat him in 2011 and has the official title of the organisation’s ‘super’ champion.That defeat is one of only two suffered by Froch in his 33-fight career, during which he has been world champion three times.The step up to world level will come in Groves’ 20th professional fight and the Londoner insists he is ready for the challenge.Groves said: “If you look at good world champions – current, present and previous – they usually step up around the 20-fight mark and at around the age of 25.“We know what we have to do. I’ve been written off and been the underdog before and I relish it.“It’s the perfect fight for me. There will be a massive British audience and it’s against an established British world champion.”Hearn said: “I’m delighted to bring this event to Manchester on 23 November.“This ‘Battle of Britain’ is a fascinating fight between a true legend of British boxing in Carl Froch and a superb young talent in George Groves.“It’s going to be some atmosphere, some occasion. Phone lines, Twitter and e-mails haven’t stopped for tickets since we confirmed the fight.“We are expecting another instant sell-out when we go on sale on 17 September.”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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Next up for the Raiders: Unbeaten Miami and 5 reasons to remain hopeful

first_imgClick HERE if you’re having trouble viewing the gallery on your mobile device.The Raiders were embarrassed in their opener against the Rams. They (and their fans) were stunned Sunday by the Broncos.Don’t take my word for it:Raiders fans after starting 0-2 in this Gruden era. pic.twitter.com/h8QVNlfRFj — Bleacher Report (@BleacherReport) September 16, 2018There’s no sugar-coating it — the Raiders had the Broncos beat, and, just guessing here, the only noise on the flight home …last_img

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A’s Mike Fiers throws no-hitter against Reds

first_imgClick here if you have trouble viewing the gallery in your mobile device.OAKLAND — When we last saw Mike Fiers at the Coliseum, the Toronto Blue Jays hit .500 against him and beat the Athletics 10-1.So Fiers, moved up in the rotation a day by manager Bob Melvin, was eager to erase that memory as well the bad feelings from a few other recent starts. He succeeded beyond his wildest dreams Tuesday night, beating the Cincinnati Reds 2-0 with the 13th no-hitter in franchise history.It was the …last_img

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All By Myself

first_imgWhat would you do if you had a last minute overnight layover in Las Vegas? For most of us it would be an excuse to party on the Strip until sunrise. Richard Dunn however, got a little more creative. He gave up a night of partying in favour of a night in with his iPhone, filming a music video to Celine Dion’s “All By Myself.”So how does one “all by himself” alone in an airport manage to capture a spectacular video almost as good as Celines? Richard explains his approach. “I had a person behind a ticket counter give me a roll of luggage tape before she left. I then used a wheelchair that had a tall pole on the back of it and taped my iPhone to that. Then I would put it on the moving walkway for a dolly shot,” Dunn wrote on his Vimeo page. “I also used the extended handle on my computer bag and taped the iPhone to my handle. I would tuck different stuff under the bag to get the right angle. For the escalator shot I had to sprint up the steps after I got my shot so the computer bag didn’t hit the top and fall back down. Quite fun!”You can see the brilliant video (below) of Dunn lip-syncing to Celine’s hit while wandering through the vacant airport. We hope this is not a one hit wonder for him!last_img read more

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Sasol, Aus firm in Botswana energy JV

first_img“A discovery of large volumes of coal bed methane in Botswana could be used to generate power and liquid fuels in southern Africa,” said Sasol. “The need to decrease greenhouse gas emissions also favours the increased use of natural gas as an alternative to coal.” “The joint venture partners plan to conduct a number of exploration activities in the licence area during the next two years to determine the quantity of natural gas available and the feasibility for future commercial development,” Sasol said in a statement this week. SAinfo reporter Clean natural gas by-product Coal bed methane is a clean natural gas by-product of ancient plant matter, trapped in underground coal seams. It is produced through a process of desorbing natural gas from coal using wells drilled for that purpose – similar to the mine safety processes used in degassing coal mines. Early stage of development Although coal bed methane is produced by unconventional means, it is sold and used in the same manner as conventional natural gas. The transaction is subject to final approval by the Botswana government. The water that is produced during the production process is pumped to the surface and treated so it can be disposed of or recycled for beneficial purposes such as agriculture.center_img 3 November 2011 “The first phase of the exploration will include an airborne magnetic survey, sampling of borehole cores and the drilling of test wells.” Coal bed methane exploration is still in the early stages of development in southern Africa. However, coal bed methane accounts for approximately 10% of total natural gas produced in the United States, and makes up most of Australia’s natural gas supply. Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo material If the first exploration phase proves successful, the joint venture partners will consider committing to a more extensive exploration programme in Botswana. The three prospecting licences cover an area of approximately 3 000km² and are located in the central province of Botswana. South African petrochemical giant Sasol has entered into a joint venture with Australia’s Origin Energy, forming a new company called Kubu Energy Resources that has acquired three licences to explore for coal bed methane gas in Botswana. last_img read more

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The Roundup lawsuits: what is going on?

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Evin Bachelor, Law Fellow, Ohio State University Extension Agricultural & Resource Law ProgramA jury recently returned a verdict awarding a California couple $2.055 billion (yes, billion) in damages after the couple alleged that the glyphosate in Roundup caused their cancer. This is the third California jury to be convinced that the Monsanto herbicide, which was acquired by Bayer last year, caused or substantially contributed to a cancer diagnosis of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Thousands of glyphosate lawsuits have been filed against Monsanto/BayerOver 13,000 cases have been filed alleging almost the same thing: that a plaintiff’s cancer was caused by the glyphosate in Roundup. About two years ago there were only a few hundred such cases. News stories about large jury verdicts have caught people’s attention, as have commercials that some law firms have aired to find clients for this type of litigation. The vast majority of these cases have been brought in state courts, which have a reputation for being somewhat quicker than federal courts, but there are still over a thousand in federal courts across the country. So far, only three of these cases have reached a jury, and all have been in California. First California jury awarded a plaintiff $289 millionDewayne Johnson was a school groundskeeper who routinely used Roundup as part of his job. He was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in 2014, and believed that his diagnosis was a result of at least two prior incidents where he was soaked with Roundup. His lawsuit against Monsanto in California state court was chosen to be the first case to be tried before a jury because his doctors did not expect him to live for much longer.The San Francisco jury sided with Mr. Johnson and awarded him $39 million in compensatory damages, and $250 million in punitive damages. Compensatory damages are meant to directly compensate for harm, and can include medical expenses, lost wages, and emotional distress. Punitive damages, on the other hand, are meant to punish the party in the wrong and deter a similar course of conduct in the future. The judge in the case ultimately reduced the punitive damages to match the compensatory damages, leaving Mr. Johnson with a potential $78 million recovery. However, the decision is on appeal. Second California jury awarded a plaintiff $80 millionEdwin Hardeman sprayed Roundup on his property for about three decades. In 2014, he was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, and decided to file a lawsuit two years later after learning about research connecting his form of cancer to Roundup use. His lawsuit was the first to be heard in federal court. This San Francisco jury awarded Mr. Hardeman $5.8 million in compensatory damages, and $75 million in punitive damages. However, the decision is also on appeal. Third California jury awarded the plaintiffs $2.055 billionThe first two cases certainly sent shock waves through the news, but the size of this third jury award sent more than just shock. The plaintiffs, Alva and Alberta Pilliod, are a California couple who were diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma within four years of each other. The jury awarded the couple $55 million in compensatory damages, along with $1 billion in punitive damages each. Bayer has promised to appeal this decision as well.Will the parties ultimately get these punitive damages? It is hard to answer this question just yet, but it is likely that the punitive damages awards will be reduced. Courts are often weary about awarding punitive damages absent bad intentions by the party being punished, and few verdicts result in a punitive damages award. When they are awarded, there are constitutional limitations on how large the award can be. The U.S. Supreme Court has said that a punitive damages award that exceeds a compensatory damages award by more than a single digit multiplier likely violates a party’s due process rights and is not likely to be upheld. This means that if a punitive damages award exceeds nine or ten times the compensatory damages, courts are to look at that jury’s decision with a high level of suspicion. However, such an award could ultimately be awarded if the evidence of bad intent merits such an award, and if such award is necessary to deter future bad acts.Bayer’s first hope on appeal is to have the jury decisions invalidated altogether by arguing that the juries were incorrect in linking these plaintiff’s cancer to their prior use of Roundup. In order to succeed, it must prove that the decisions of the three juries were against the “manifest weight of the evidence,” meaning that they relied too much on one pile of evidence leaning one way while ignoring a mountain of evidence going the other way. If it can succeed on this, then it would not have to pay damages to the plaintiffs. However, this can be a high burden for an appellant to satisfy because of our legal system’s deference to juries. If Bayer cannot succeed on avoiding fault, it would still argue that the jury awards are excessive.In the first case, the initial jury award had a single digit multiplier of roughly six; however, the judge viewed even that multiplier as excessive and reduced the punitive damages award to match the compensatory damages award. In the second case, the initial jury award had a multiplier of over twelve, which could give Bayer a strong argument on appeal if it is ultimately determined that it must pay the plaintiffs. However, Bayer is also challenging the basis of the jury’s decision on appeal.The third case is simply on a different level. The $2 billion in punitive damages is 36 times the compensatory damages awarded to the couple. The trial judge may respond like the first trial judge and reduce the compensatory damages award; however, that is not a guarantee. What is likely a guarantee is that Bayer will appeal. Does glyphosate cause non-Hodgkins lymphoma?This question will continue to be a debate for years, and we as attorneys are not in the best spot to make any sorts of determinations based on the scientific research. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and a number of scientific studies say no; however, the World Health Organization said in 2015 that glyphosate was “probably carcinogenic to humans.” It was that announcement, and some research that followed, which triggered the wave of lawsuits we see today. Bayer is using the first set of research to defend its product, while the plaintiffs are using the second set of research to attack Roundup. The attorneys in the first three cases tried to undercut Bayer’s use of EPA and university research by arguing Monsanto had influenced the first set of research in a manner favorable to it.For better or worse, what matters in a jury trial is less what the science says, and more what the jury believes the science says. So far, three California juries have been convinced that there is enough science to say that glyphosate caused or contributed to the cancer of four plaintiffs. The first non-California cases are beginning to be scheduled for later this year, including in Monsanto’s former home in St. Louis. As of now, it remains to be seen whether the first three cases will be the outliers or the norms for the glyphosate litigation nationwide.last_img read more

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Amy Winehouses God Daughter Gets Gory For Animal Advocacy

first_imgEver since she shot to fame performing on Strictly Come Dancing, 17-year-old Dionne Bromfield has been known for her soulful voice, which is reminiscent of that of her late godmother, Amy Winehouse. Now, the talented singer’s advocacy for animals will be well known, too.Dionne Bromfield – Here’s the Rest of Your Fur CoatCredit/Copyright: PETA UKIn her new anti-fur ad for PETA, Bromfield holds a bloodied, skinned fox and stares pointedly into the camera above the words “Here’s the Rest of Your Fur Coat”.“Not only is fur cruel, it’s also totally gross”, says Bromfield. “I mean, who wants to wear the skin of an abused animal? Not me! I watched one of PETA’s fur videos, and I challenge anyone who wears fur to watch it, too. Seeing these terrified animals as they have their skin ripped off their backs just so that someone can walk around in a fur coat or hat really upset me – but it also inspired me to try to raise awareness about the fur trade.”Animals on fur farms spend their entire lives confined to cramped, filthy cages before they are beaten, gassed or anally electrocuted. Sometimes, they are even skinned while still alive. More than 2 million cats and dogs are skinned in China every year – many while fully conscious. Designers such as Ralph Lauren, Stella McCartney, Tommy Hilfiger, Calvin Klein and Vivienne Westwood have all publicly sworn off fur. With so many stylish alternatives available, there’s no excuse to harm a hair on an animal’s head.Bromfield joins a long list of celebrities – including Sophie Ellis-Bextor, Joss Stone, Mark Ronson, Ke$ha, Rylan Clark, Natalie Imbruglia and Jamelia – who have teamed up with PETA to speak out against the fur industry.For more information, please visit PETA.org.uk.last_img read more

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EDMONTON FILMMAKERS TO APPEAR AT PRESTIGIOUS SUNDANCE FESTIVAL

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Edmonton director Trevor Anderson, local cinematographer Peter Wunstorf and Alyson Richards on the set of Docking in L.A. FISH GRIWKOWSKY / POSTMEDIA Advertisement The Sundance Film Festival — touted as the most important independent film festival in North America — will play works by local filmmakers Trevor Anderson and Niobe Thompson when festivities kick off Jan. 24.Anderson’s new, four-minute film, Docking, which explores the filmmaker’s fear of dating, will be seen in the Midnight Shorts section of the festival, which takes place in Park City, Utah. Though Anderson has had two films previously viewed at Sundance, he is nonetheless thrilled to have Docked make the festival lineup.“It hasn’t lost any of the adrenalin spike that comes with that phone call,” said Anderson, a former actor, director and writer in theatre who has created 11 films since he branched into filmmaking in 2005. Advertisement Advertisementcenter_img Most of his work is on his website, trevorandersonfilms.com. But Edmonton audiences will have to wait to see Docking at the Docking Variety Hour, presented by Anderson at the Garneau Theatre at 9:30 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 9.The film, said Anderson, feels like a “very fast blockbuster.”“We’re riffing on science fiction, horror, and we wanted to pack the feeling of those into four minutes to make it seem like an intense creature-feature.”Other former Edmontonians have a part in Docking, including production designer Todd Cherniawsky (Star Wars: The Last Jedi; Star Trek: Discovery; Avatar) and editor Justin Lachance (Sharp Objects; Big Little Lies). Locally-based cinematographer Peter Wunstorf shot the film. Fish Griwkowsky, an Edmonton Journal arts writer, is associate producer and puppeteer on the project.Edmonton’s Niobe Thompson has a short film appearing at Sundance called Fast Horse. SUPPLIED /POSTMEDIAFast Horse, by Edmonton filmmaker Niobe Thompson of Handful of Films, will compete in the International Shorts program at Sundance. (Readers may also be familiar with Thompson’s work; in September, he debuted a three-part series called Equus: Story of the Horse on CBC television.)Fast Horse, which is 13 minutes long, is about the horse-racing tradition among Plains First Nation. Thompson followed a Blackfoot team from the Siksika First Nation over the course of a year to make the film. Directed by emerging Indigenous filmmaker Alexandra Lazarowich, the film focuses on Siksika horseman Allison Red Crow and new jockey Cody Big Tobacco as they challenge the best riders in the Blackfoot Confederacy.“Indian relay is North America’s original extreme sport,” said Thompson, who was travelling in Australia and not available by phone, in an email.Commissioned by the CBC, Fast Horse was recently awarded best short documentary after its world première at the ImagineNative Film and Media Arts Festival in Toronto.Fast Horse and Handful of Films’ other new short film, Boy Nomad, were both recently selected for a world tour hosted by the Banff Mountain Film Festival, the world’s largest adventure filmmaking festival. The best films of each year are selected for a 12-month theatrical run, playing in 45 countries to an audience of more than 600,000 at more than 1,000 worldwide screenings.By LIANE FAULDER | Edmonton Journal Login/Register With: Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Decision 2015 Live election coverage

first_imgDecision 2015Live on APTN at 8:30pm Eastern/5:30 Pacific watch aptn National News coverage of the federal election.We have our reporters across the country to bring you the results.Plus two panels of guests to share their perspective and opinion at APTN headquarters and in Ottawa.You can also watch streaming online at www.aptn.ca/decision2015last_img

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