Sole ESL minor reflects on learning experiences

first_imgThe junior class at Saint Mary’s has a small number of students that are pursuing Elementary Education majors. However, out of all those students, Mary Stechschulte, is the only one who chose to also participate in English as a Second Language as her required minor.All Elementary Education majors are required to minor in something, but English as a Second Language is one of the four minors that provide students licensure to teach in Indiana upon completion. The other three are Mild Intervention, Reading and Early Childhood.“I studied French for 13 years, Spanish for two years and I dabbled into a very small amount of Arabic,” Stechschulte said. “The whole point of the minor is that I do not know how to speak any other language fluently.”Stechschulte originally started off as an Elementary Education major with minors in Spanish and history.“Spanish did not really fit into my schedule freshman year,” Stechschulte said. “They never really told us about the English as a Second Language, but I asked the right questions and found out about it.”Stechschulte said the minor focuses on helping train students in the context of classrooms whose first languages are not English.“It teaches how to reach students on different levels while still being respectful,” Stechschulte said. “It is all about cultural competence and making students feel welcome while still helping them learn important techniques.”Saint Mary’s professor Susan Devetski, who started teaching in the College’s education department last semester, said students learn how to teach children and how to embrace diversity in the classroom through this program.“The English learners at elementary and high school are from diverse backgrounds and speak a variety of languages, so teachers need not speak their language, but rather be open and willing to learn to teach English,” Devetski said.This minor not only allows individuals opportunities to learn in a classroom setting, but also to have real life experiences in local schools.“I have a new placement every semester at different schools,” Stechschulte said. “In this past fall semester, I was placed in a school that was mainly composed of Spanish-speaking children, while this semester there is more diversity in the school I am placed at.”Devetski teaches two courses and supervises English as a Second Language students while they work in the field.“Field experience is a strong part of the program,” Devetski said. “Students attend cultural experiences on and off campus to expand their own thinking and understanding.”In the United States, Devetski said, there is a very high need for teachers who are trained and certified in ESL, as the number of English learners continues to grow in elementary, middle and high schools.“The minor is excellent for education majors, and others interested should contact advisors to see if it is possible,” Devetski said.Tags: education, English as a second language, saint mary’s, Susan Devetskilast_img read more

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National Night Out In Dunkirk Postponed

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) WNY News Now File Image.DUNKIRK — The National Night Out event that was planned for September 1 in Dunkirk has been postponed.The decision to postpone the event came after a discussion with the Night Out Committee.It follows a recent cluster of cases found to be associated with the Fieldbrook Foods facility.“This has been a very unique year for all of us with the COVID-19 pandemic,” Dunkirk Police leaders said. There’s no new date scheduled yet, but police say the National Night Out will be rescheduled “once the situation settles down.”last_img

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Cairns rental rate tight, political changes to impact sector

first_imgVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:53Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:53 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p216p216pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenAustralia’s regional real estate hot spots01:54THE state’s peak real estate body is concerned changes to renting laws which could erode landlords’ rights would put pressure on rental availability, especially in markets such as Cairns which has maintained a rental vacancy rate below 2 per cent for years.Real Estate Institute of Queensland chief executive Antonia Mercorella said while the Queensland property market was poised for a solid performance in 2019, investors faced uncertainty.The State Government is set to finalise its ongoing review of the Residential Tenancies and Rooming Accommodation Act in the first half of this year, with a range of potential measures that are concerning to landlords.“The public rhetoric around this review seems to focus on eroding landlord rights and creating severe imbalance with disproportionate levels of power weighted in favour of tenants,” Ms Mercorella said.“The legislation must serve both parties equally, rather than give all the rights to one party and disadvantage the other. Distorted laws serve no one and will only create dysfunction in the rental sector,” Ms Mercorella said.“This concerns us because more than 34 per cent of Queenslanders rent and that number is rising, and if we lose investors we may face a rental accommodation shortage.”More from newsCairns home ticks popular internet search terms2 days agoTen auction results from ‘active’ weekend in Cairns2 days agoEqually concerning to investors are the flagged changes to the negative gearing provisions from federal Labor.“The negative gearing policy was first announced in 2015 when Sydney and Melbourne house prices were growing at double-digit rates. It was seen as a way to limit investor activity in the market and make way for owner occupiers, creating less competition for stock and, as a result, soften price growth.“However, prices in Sydney and Melbourne are now falling. This raises the question — does the nation really need a policy that is designed to push house prices down? What purpose do these changes serve now?” Ms Mercorella said.last_img read more

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