Studying energy, environment

first_imgA major Antarctic ice sheet has begun a slow, inexorable slide into the sea, scientists said this week. A government report said last week that climate change is already bringing drought, heat waves, torrential rains, and invasive pests to the United States.Scientists say these developments are just the tip of the iceberg on climate change, a problem that promises to worsen over time and to require attention from experts in many fields, including scientists, politicians, lawyers, businesspeople, and public health workers.Harvard faculty members, University leaders, and students understand that it is important to train the next generation of climate scientists, but it’s also important that students in other disciplines have every opportunity to understand environmental issues.To do that, the Environmental Science and Public Policy program, in coordination with the Harvard University Center for the Environment (HUCE), will offer a new secondary field in energy and environment (E&E), which provides an avenue through which undergraduates in any field can learn about climate change.“The E&E secondary field is an exciting new development in the Harvard undergraduate curriculum,” said Paul Moorcroft, chair of the Environmental Science and Public Policy program. “Both energy and environment loom as defining issues for the 21st century and for this generation of Harvard students. The purpose of the new E&E secondary field is to provide an intellectual forum for students from a wide range of concentrations to engage with the key questions, challenges, and opportunities that surround the intertwined futures of the world’s energy demands and the Earth’s environments — both natural and human-made.”The secondary field is designed to allow students to explore issues surrounding energy and the environment from the perspective of their primary discipline. For example, an English concentrator might want to increase her knowledge of energy and the environment from the perspectives of environmental literature or history, while a student interested in global health might want to understand the effects of climate change on water, nutrition, and health.Harvard President Drew Faust said that the new secondary field is part of a broad University commitment to support research and education on the climate-energy challenge, which promises to be a central global issue facing the generation of leaders being educated now.“Our faculty and students have vital roles to play in confronting the challenge of climate change, and we’re committed to advancing their work,” she said. “This new secondary field creates an important academic pathway for our undergraduates to engage with one of the most pressing issues of our time.”HUCE Director Daniel Schrag, Sturgis Hooper Professor of Geology and professor of environmental science and engineering, said the new secondary field was created in part because students in recent years have been asking for such a program. It is modeled after the Harvard Graduate Consortium on Energy and Environment, which combines coursework and a weekly seminar to create a community of doctoral students from various fields who share an interest in energy and the environment.The point of the consortium, Schrag said, is not to create an interdisciplinary field for those students, but to make them knowledgeable about cross-cutting issues in energy and the environment that may affect their main area of study.“We want them to be really good at what they do. We want them to be good economists, good chemists, good physicists. We feel like that’s important to lots of different people, because over the course of their careers they will encounter these issues,” Schrag said. “The ESPP concentration is a fabulous interdisciplinary concentration, it is really effective for the 15 to 20 students per class who concentrate in it. But I believe that every undergraduate at Harvard should learn about climate change, about energy technology, about policy related to these issues, about environmental issues more generally.”Students interested in the energy and environment secondary field would be required to take four courses: one broad foundational course, and three advanced courses drawn from categories of social sciences/humanities, or natural sciences/engineering. In addition, students would have access to the HUCE’s resources, including its approximately 250 faculty affiliates and its regular public programs. Students will be required to attend one of those public events each semester, as well as a special seminar with the presenter.“There are important contributions needed from many different people,” Schrag said. “People who study the arts, that’s an important way of thinking about these issues; people who study economics, no question; people who study history, of course; people who study psychology. There’s really interesting work in this space on why people make the choices they do. You want to talk about philosophy? Well, think about the ethical dimensions of some of these problems. These challenges are so great and so pervasive there’s really no field that is not relevant to this issue.”last_img read more

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What not to do when you are job hunting

first_imgWe’ve all been through a job search at least a couple of times in our lives. If you’re looking for a new gig, here are 5 things you shouldn’t do.Only apply for jobs online: The internet is a great way to discover job openings, but sometimes you have to get off that couch and do some work. A resume can make you look good, but a smile and a handshake can really sell the first impression, so don’t be afraid to get out there and pound the pavement.Tell co-workers about it: You may think you have some close friends at the office, but things always seem to get around, so it’s probably best to keep news of your job search to yourself. The last thing you want is to have your boss scrutinizing your every move.Apply for jobs you’re overqualified for: You find yourself not having much luck getting interviews for jobs you’re qualified for, so you think it may be best to aim a little lower. Wrong. You’re good at what you do. Those jobs are too easy for you. Hiring managers know this. They know you’ll be bored and unchallenged. Go after those jobs that will test your skills and abilities.Go to every interview: Sometimes the interview process can be overwhelming. Sometimes in the middle of the process your gut tells you that you’re in the wrong place. I once had a hiring manager call to reschedule a 3rd interview with her company. The minute I hung up the phone, I immediately knew the job wasn’t for me. I called her back and told her the truth. She appreciated me not wasting her time.Accept the first offer you get: You may be stressed and frustrated that you can’t find your dream job, but don’t get stuck in a bad situation because you’re having trouble being patient. Have faith that you’ll find something better and let the process run its course. You’ll be much happier accepting a dream job instead of just settling for a new job. 41SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Pettit John Pettit is the Managing Editor for CUInsight.com. John manages the content on the site, including current news, editorial, press releases, jobs and events. He keeps the credit union … Web: www.cuinsight.com Detailslast_img read more

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Defense lacking in Badgers’ win

first_imgDEREK MONTGOMERY/Herald photoMINNEAPOLIS, Minn. — A week’s worth of preparation and reflection didn’t help the Wisconsin Badgers’ defense Saturday with the win against the Golden Gophers. Just seven days removed from a contest that saw the UW defense give up a record number of total yards, the defense almost set another record: most rushing yards allowed in school history.For the second consecutive week, and third time this year, the Wisconsin defense allowed their opponent to post more than 30 points in a game. But unlike UW’s previous two opponents that posted upwards of 30, Northwestern and Bowling Green, Minnesota is not a team anyone would classify as a high-octane offense.In fact, Minnesota’s crawl ball is the antithesis of the offenses run by the Wildcats and Falcons. But that didn’t stop the Gophers from putting up huge numbers, and for the second consecutive week, it was an opposing team’s tailback that created most of the damage.Minnesota’s star tailback, Laurence Maroney looked nearly unstoppable in the game, running, juking and plowing his way to an impressive 258 yards on the ground. The Gophers’ running game was so dominant that Maroney passed the century mark before halftime, and his backup, Gary Russell, finished the game with 139 yards on 19 carries.”Maroney’s one of the best backs in the country,” defensive tackle Mike Newkirk said. “We knew that coming in and we had to prepare for him. But we were going after him whether he was the best or the worst, it doesn’t really matter. We knew we had to try and contain him.”All told, the Badgers gave up 411 yards on the ground on the day, just 41 yards shy of the most yards allowed by a Wisconsin defense. UW’s run-stuffing ability was a far cry from the defense that was allowing less than a 100 yards per game on the ground prior to their loss to Northwestern.”As a defensive line we preach that everything is on us,” Newkirk said. “There might be issues in the secondary, there might be issues at linebacker but that doesn’t matter to us. As far as the yardage that the other guy is getting we take that all on ourselves.”So what has changed in the last two weeks that have transformed this team from a veritable wall against the run, to the porous product fans saw Saturday? To a man, the Badger defense will tell you the biggest culprit is one thing — tackling.”Our tackling wasn’t good today, that’s definitely our biggest problem right now,” free safety Roderick Rogers admitted.The Badgers missed tackles throughout the day, allowing the Gophers to get second chances on their running plays and rack up the yards after catch in the passing game. Perhaps one of the most telling statistics is the number of yards Gopher rushers lost Saturday.Despite running the ball 63 times in the contest, Wisconsin’s defense was unable to stop the Gophers at the point of attack and Minnesota’s backs only lost a grand total of four yards on the game.Injuries were also a factor for the Badgers, who spent much of the second half with a makeshift defensive line. A unit that could ill-afford to lose more bodies got even thinner throughout the game as defensive end Joe Monty and defensive tackle Jason Chapman both left the game due to injuries forcing defensive coordinator Bret Bielema to rely heavily on Matt Schaunessy, Kurt Ware, who was also nicked up during the game, and Nick Hayden while rotating in various players throughout the game.”We were thin coming in and we lost a couple more, so there were some guys out there that I didn’t know were out there,” Bielema said.The wear and tear of the season, which doesn’t give UW a bye week until the end of the conference season, was also evident in the secondary. While UW did open the game with their usual starters, Allen Langford and Brett Bell, on the field, the two cornerback spots saw unusually high number substitutions against Minnesota.”There are a lot of plays out there and I took special attention to that after last week,” Bielema said. “We had 89 snaps for some of our guys and then there’s special teams players in there as well, we just got to make sure we’re not putting too much on our guys physically.”Redshirt freshman Jack Ikegwuonu saw the most action of his career Saturday, while Levonne Rowan also saw a noticeable increase in his playing time. That playing time came mostly at the cost of Bell, who saw his time diminish increasingly as the game went on.”You’ve got to help as much as you can,” Bell said. “I’m not on the field, it doesn’t mean I don’t want to win the game.”With the injuries mounting and the length of the season taking its toll, UW must spend the week again trying to figure out an approach to stop opponents running attacks.”We’ve just got to go in, watch film and see why we’re giving up so many rushing yards. I really don’t know why it’s happening,” linebacker Mark Zalewski said.last_img read more

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My Birthday Mixed with Disheartening

first_imgMr. Editor:One of the best treats you could give me on my birthday will be to publish my views in your widely read newspaper. Thanks for the space.Today Friday, November 14, 2014 marks my 50th birthday anniversary, but I am observing this milestone in my life with mixed reactions.Indeed, I am grateful to God for sparing my life to see this day, but I am also imbued with excruciating pains to see the dreadful trend in which Liberia, our mother land is taking.How disheartening it is to see Liberia retrogresses in achieving its development goals. What a pity that in a country of abundance of resources, a vast majority of Liberians still live in abject poverty while a privileged few enjoy unprecedented luxury?Many government officials entrusted with the mantle of authority to effectively manage the resources of the nation for the great benefits of all Liberians have over the years engaged in the systematic corruption which has heightened poverty and misery amongst ordinary Liberians.Without the shadow of doubt, the case of forging development in Liberia is proving to be a stubborn one owing to two basic reasons: Firstly, because the policymakers and planners in Liberia are almost always playing “deaf ears” to analytical views from critical thinkers expressed to see Liberia’s development enhanced; and secondly, bulk of the Liberian people have decided to play the role of spectators rather than play pro-active role in the nation building process.It is a pity that Liberia can show hardly anything, speaking in terms of development, after 167 long years of independence.The blunt reality is that Liberia will probably observe two or more centuries of independence without accomplishing any development if Liberians from all walks of life fail to reconcile their divergent views, and strategize the way forward to national growth and development.Let me close with an excerpt from Rev. Martin Luther Kings’ “Letter from Birmingham Jail” written on April 16, 1963: “We will have to repent in this generation not merely for the hateful words and actions of the bad people, but for the appalling silence of the good people.” Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Boys’ soccer: Sanchez’s dream real

first_imgIf the excitement leading up to Friday’s game wasn’t enough to keep Kevin Sanchez awake at night, it’s not likely he had a much easier time getting to sleep Friday night. Sanchez sparked an outburst of excitement and celebration for the Chatsworth High boys’ soccer team when he scored the winning goal in the 79th minute of Friday’s City Section quarterfinal against visiting Sylmar. The 2-1 victory extends the third-seeded Chancellors’ deepest playoff run in more than a decade, with a matchup Wednesday at No. 2 San Fernando being the final obstacle in the way of Chatsworth’s first final since 1991. The Chancellors failed to score on three consecutive corner kicks shortly before Sanchez’s goal, but Chatsworth coach Vahan Minassian said he never felt a sense of desperation from his team. “I think we knew we had it,” Minassian said. “If we play our game, we are in control. “After that first goal, it was, `Wow, we thought it was offsides.’ But that’s why you play the game and you have to go with the ref’s calls. “These guys, they didn’t let that get to them, they never let up. My hats go off to all of them, they did a phenomenal job.” The loss was just the third of the season for sixth-seeded Sylmar (21-3-3). “That’s a fantastic team and they gave us a great game,” Minassian said. Up next is a San Fernando team that has defeated Chatsworth twice this season. [email protected] (818) 713-3607 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Teammates dogpiled on Sanchez after his decisive shot, which came off a rebound of a Travis Bowen shot that hit the post. “I couldn’t believe it,” Sanchez said. “It’s like a dream. I couldn’t even sleep last night I was thinking about the game so much. This is even better than what I’d dream. I can’t even describe it.” center_img Chatsworth (19-6-2) never led until that score in the closing minutes. The Chancellors spent much of the game trying to erase an early deficit created when Sylmar’s Cesar Sarabia scored on an open net in the third minute. Chatsworth goalkeeper Giovanni Castaneda had make a sliding play to prevent one score, but before he could get up, Sarabia ran past him for a lead that lasted until the second half. Bowen scored the tying Chatsworth’s tying goal in the 55th minute. “I think it actually helped when they got the lead,” Sanchez said. “That was important because it made us more focused and made us play our hardest the whole game.” last_img
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