National Night Out In Dunkirk Postponed

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) WNY News Now File Image.DUNKIRK — The National Night Out event that was planned for September 1 in Dunkirk has been postponed.The decision to postpone the event came after a discussion with the Night Out Committee.It follows a recent cluster of cases found to be associated with the Fieldbrook Foods facility.“This has been a very unique year for all of us with the COVID-19 pandemic,” Dunkirk Police leaders said. There’s no new date scheduled yet, but police say the National Night Out will be rescheduled “once the situation settles down.”last_img

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Wheat Outbreaks

first_imgConsumers have long been warned against the hazards of eating raw cookie dough. As more cases of foodborne illness are linked to contaminated wheat flour, University of Georgia food safety experts are touting the risk in a louder, more forceful voice, while searching for ways to eliminate foodborne pathogens on wheat products.In wheat-related cases, the common carriers of the pathogens are cookie dough, cake batter and raw wheat flour. The most recent outbreak started in May and was linked to wheat flour contaminated with E. coli 026 bacteria. Three brands of contaminated all-purpose flour were found at grocery stores in eight states, to date. So far, 21 cases of E. coli 026 infections have been reported.In 2005, 26 cases in the U.S. were linked to cake-batter ice cream and in 2008 a cluster of cases in New Zealand were connected to an uncooked baking mixture. In all of these cases, the pathogen was Salmonella. In 2009, an E. coli O157:H7 outbreak resulted from consumption of raw cookie dough.“In the past, the reason we warned people not to eat cookie dough was not because of the flour, but because of the raw eggs,” said Francisco Diez, director of the UGA Center for Food Safety located on the university’s campus in Griffin, Georgia. “The two main pathogens linked to wheat products are Salmonella and E. coli.”Diez says these cases could have been prevented if the flour had not been consumed raw.“Flour is not meant to be consumed raw and cookie dough is still raw flour. You have to avoid consumption of foods that contain wheat flour unless they are baked, fried or cooked otherwise,” he said. “For the most part, as long as you bake what you make with the flour, you should be okay.”According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), it can take two to eight days for the body to present symptoms after ingesting the bacteria. For some people, like children and those who are immunocompromised, the illness can lead to serious symptom and even kidney failure.UGA Cooperative Extension Food Safety Specialist Elizabeth Andress advises consumers who have flour from the recent recall not to use it and to discard it. If the flour was stored outside its original bag, she says to thoroughly wash and dry the flour container before using it again.“Eating raw doughs, batters or any recipe that contains raw flour can make someone sick,” she said. “Children and others should not be allowed to play with raw dough made from any flour.”Diez, who has researched ways to keep America’s food products’ safe for the past 20 years, says that the best of line of protection when handling raw flour is to always cook the food, unlike fresh spinach and lettuce where there is little consumers can do to further protect themselves.“One outbreak came from restaurants giving kids raw dough to play with and those kids got sick,” Diez said. “It involved quite a few children who had all gone to the same restaurant and played with raw dough.”Most foods that contain wheat flour are baked, cooked or fried. The heat quickly kills the organisms so there’s no reason to be concerned, Diez says.  The number of food product recalls linked to wheat has increased, but Diez says that this is in part due to the food industry’s sharper focus on wheat as a possible carrier.At UGA’s food safety center, Diez and his team are working closely with the food industry and the CDC to identify ways to eliminate foodborne pathogens on wheat.“We know Salmonella can be found in dry foods and wheat flour, but we don’t know a lot about E. coli in wheat flour,” he said. “We need to know more about microbial pathogens in wheat in order to develop effective methods to prevent foodborne illnesses caused by wheat products.”From 2012 to 2014, a study examined over 5,000 wheat samples to determine the prevalence and levels of pathogens before the berries are milled into flour, Diez said. Salmonella was detected in 1.23% of the samples, E. coli occurred in 0.44% of the samples, Listeria spp. occurred in 0.08% of samples and L. monocytogenes was not detected.UGA’s most recent research shows that E. coli can survive in flour stored at room temperature for up to one year and Salmonella can survive under similar conditions for nine months. Heat treatment was found to be an effective method for reducing the risk of E. coli in flour, but was less effective in reducing Salmonella numbers.UGA research also found that storing flour at slightly higher temperatures (95 degrees Fahrenheit) for a minimum of two months before distribution can be an effective strategy for reducing both E. coli and Salmonella numbers.Some flour companies have begun to heat-treat or pasteurize their flour to reduce pathogens; unfortunately, this can affect the quality, Diez said.Pasteurization of flour, however, is not always available or appropriate for flour quality, Diez said, so UGA researchers are investigating the development of novel intervention strategies.last_img read more

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Whirlwind damages dozens of homes in Aceh

first_img“The Central Aceh BPBD has set up tents for refugees, collected data on injured victims and cleaned up fallen trees and houses. We are also coordinating with the social affairs agency about providing a public kitchen for evacuees,” Ishak, the agency’s chief, said on Tuesday as quoted by kompas.com.Some 20 people have been displaced. They have been temporarily relocated to a volleyball court in Jurusan village. (aly)Topics : A puting beliung (whirlwind), hit four villages in Pegasing district, Central Aceh, on Tuesday afternoon, injuring at least four residents and damaging at least 30 homes.The four affected villages were Kute Lintang village, Kayu Kul village, Jurusan village and Belang Bebangka village.As of Tuesday night, the Central Aceh Disaster Mitigation Agency (BPBD) had received reports that 15 houses were heavily damaged, 13 were moderately damaged and two were slightly damaged.last_img read more

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ISP releases “Operation C.A.R.E.’ results

first_imgVerailles, In. — The Indiana State Police have participated in the Combined Accident Reduction Effort (C.A.R.E.) since the inception of this multi-state enforcement project in 1977, of which Indiana and Michigan were the founding members. Now, more than three dozen local and state law enforcement agencies nationwide participate in this life-saving enforcement project.For the Thanksgiving Holiday Project C.A.R.E. was operational from November 21stthrough the 25th.  Below are the Indiana results from this five day enforcement project.While most information is self-explanatory, ‘CMV’ stands for Commercial Motor Vehicle and ‘Motorist Assists’ reflects the number of times motorists were assisted by state police officers while roadside. Examples of the type of assistance provided would include help with directions, changing a flat tire, calling a tow truck, obtaining fuel or other types of services to assist the motoring public.last_img read more

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Restaurant robbers feed fears, then vanish

first_imgThey boldly swept into Los Angeles restaurants, menacing patrons with pistols, their faces chillingly obscured. Called the Ski Mask Bandits by police, they killed the owner of Chao’s Thai Cafe in Northridge during a spree of violence that spanned two years. In all, they hit 52 restaurants, mostly in the San Fernando Valley, leaving a trail of violence and fear that received national attention. Despite a massive police effort and a $75,000 reward on their heads, they eluded capture. Then, in September 2006, they vanished after robbing a Japanese restaurant in Los Feliz. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREStriving toward a more perfect me: Doug McIntyre “They’ve been quiet for a year, knock on wood,” said LAPD Deputy Chief Michel Moore, head of the Valley Bureau. “Don’t wake them up, OK?” The robbers operated in two- and three-man teams, moving with a tight precision that suggested professional training. Rumors circulated in the restaurant community – maybe they were ex-cops, or soldiers who had turned their training to nefarious pursuits. The manner in which they obscured their faces made the whole thing even creepier. With their heads encased in knit-wool like terrorists, their victims couldn’t tell them apart – and police couldn’t be sure whether it was the same guys. Similar robberies caused enough concern that Los Angeles Police Chief William Bratton sought a change in the law to hit similarly disguised predators with stiffer prison sentences. The department lobbied legislators to criminalize masked crime with an additional two years or an extra 25percent of a sentence. Even after things quieted down following the last robbery on Sept.14, 2006, the fear lived on. The California Restaurant Association organized meetings with police, and Moore warned, “These predators are out there, and we know they will be back.” And, yet, they never materialized. “Either they moved on or got scared off,” said City Councilman Dennis Zine, who called for the $75,000 reward. “I don’t know how the criminal mind works – were they arrested, did they stop, did it get too hot? I don’t know, but I’m glad that it’s stopped occurring.” And so is Tom Monteleone, who runs Barone’s Famous Italian Restaurant in Valley Glen with his family. Monteleone was celebrating the grand reopening of the old-time pizza joint in July 2006 when the uninvited guests arrived. “The way they came in here, they obviously staked this place out real good before they hit us,” he said. “They probably had dinner in here a couple times to get things figured out.” When they burst in, guns in hand, the bandits knew exactly what to do. One demanded money from the bartender; the other headed right for Monteleone and pressed a pistol to his head. A terrified staff fled as the robbers made off with the cash and the owner’s wristwatch. Everyone was a wreck for days. Monteleone is a tough man who’s seen plenty of tense situations, but he saw no need to take a chance on another robbery. He erected a 6-foot fence around the back of the restaurant, now locks the back door after the last delivery of the night, and hired a security guard. “The first one’s a wake-up call,” he said. “You’d have to be pretty stupid not to do something, so we took precautions. But (the robbers have) just disappeared.” Police offer few clues as to where, however. “We’re working on some suspects – this thing is active,” Lt. Jim Grayson of the Robbery-Homicide Division said. “We’ve got some things we’re working on right now, but nothing I feel comfortable talking about at this time.” Fame plays an odd role for high-profile criminals. The Zodiac Killer stoked the public interest in his murders with cryptic communiques with newspapers. The BTK Killer laid low after taunting the police in Wichita throughout the 1970s and ’80s, then resurfaced by contacting a TV station in 2005, 14 years after his last murder. The Ski Mask Bandits, for all their notoriety, never left any publicly discovered clues as to their identities. Whether they modified their habits, took them elsewhere or slipped up on another crime and ended up in jail – unpunished for their robberies – the fear the bandits brought also evaporated. After a drop in diners last fall, business has bounced back and owners have regained their optimism. “Obviously, you feel better when the thieves are caught, but who knows what happened?” said Kearsten Shepherd, a California Restaurant Association spokeswoman. “Maybe they moved on, maybe something else happened. But the community feels better, so that’s good.” For news and observations about crime in Los Angeles and the San Fernando Valley, check out the Daily News’ crime blog by clicking here.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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