The Hub’ sparks academic dialogue

first_imgNotre Dame students recently launched the Hub, a new online academic networking site created to facilitate intellectual discussion across various disciplines. The Hub is completely user-generated, depending on contributions from Notre Dame students, faculty and staff. The site consists of three main areas: “Commons,” which is a place for users to share personal experiences and get involved, “Think Tank,” which acts a platform for discussion on local, national and global issues and “Showcase,” which allows users to post some of their best research or artwork. Notre Dame is one of the first universities in the country to support such a site, Co-Editor-in-Chiefs Kirsten Adam and Paul Baranay, both juniors, said. Adam and Baranay said with the Hub, they hope to redirect some of the energy that students exhibit on the Internet to a more professional, intellectual arena. “Students are already used to talking about their lives online with social networking. Moving that into a Notre Dame-focused place like the Hub is a … natural direction,” Baranay said. Adam said that unlike Facebook and Twitter profiles, which are generally hidden from employers, profiles on the Hub are something students should put forward. “It’s a very professional environment. It’s something you tell [future employers] about, not that you try to hide,” Adam said. “You can update your profile to be a mini resume online — it becomes a living document.” Adam said the Hub is also about getting advice from others in the Notre Dame community and addressing communication issues between students in different colleges. “It’s been a really interdisciplinary project,” she said. “We’re sponsored by CUSE, and pulling in money from [various] academic departments.” Baranay said other universities have networking sites similar to the Hub, but theirs are based on more of a social model. The Hub’s focus is much more academic. “CUNY [The City University of New York] has a site called the CUNY Commons, which is not as specific as the Hub,” he said. “In terms of prestigious universities, Notre Dame is the first one pushing towards this [kind of thing].” Adam and Baranay began actively working on the Hub last May. They met with senior Cristin O’Connor over the summer, who was developing the site’s layout and design. “In terms of the architecture — that was mostly done by OIT-affiliated students,” Baranay said. Baranay said former professor of Anthropology Daniel Lende originally came up with the idea for blogs spotlighting research and academic engagements at Notre Dame. Lende then contacted Cecilia Lucero, assistant director of Undergraduate Research in the Center for Undergraduate Scholarly Engagement (CUSE). Lucero got in touch with Adam and Baranay, who have been working on the project ever since. Lucero is the current advisor for the Hub. “We have a big mix of people on the editorial team,” Baranay said. “Everyone has different interests, which is [what we wanted].” Besides Adam, Baranay and Lucero, the Hub team includes freshman Chris Moore, sophomore Eric Huang, juniors Rosie Conover and Amanda Jonovski, and seniors Annette Ruth, Cristin O’Connor and Dan Jacobs, who is also the photo editor at The Observer. The Hub itself is public, but in order to post entries or comments, a Notre Dame ID is required. Barany said right now they are focusing on reaching out to undergraduates, faculty and staff but including alumni is a long-term goal. “We’ve had a really positive response,” Adam said. “It’s a new way to engage in the discussions we’re already engaging in, but in a more public way.” Baranay agreed. “The Hub is about pushing yourself beyond what your familiar with, doing something more,” he said. A launch party will take place today from 4 to 7 p.m. in the Dooley Room of LaFortune Student Center. Free Jimmy John’s sandwiches, T-shirts and books will be provided. Check out the newly launched website at thehub.nd.edulast_img read more

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A Day of Fun and Fond Memories in LS

first_imgLITTLE SILVER – It was a fun day but for many of those attending the Little Silver Men’s One Pitch Tourna­ment, it was also a day to remember their friend and neighbor.This year’s event was in honor of Jonathan Bitman, a borough resident, borough councilman and a longtime member of the Little Silver Crocs, the over-40 softball team, who died on Sept. 4 at age 52 after battling pancreatic cancer.The tournament, held Saturday, Sept. 29, on the sports fields behind borough hall and the public library, featured the usual softball games, cheers and shouts of players and spectators, music, laughter and conversations, along with the sizzle of grills cooking burgers and hot dogs. It was a great day for the participants, families and community members but for some, including event organizers Doug Glassmacher and Peter Roskowinski, it was a bittersweet day with Bitman’s absence felt by those who knew him.According to Glassmacher and Roskowinski, Bitman was a member of the Crocs since the team was formed more than a decade ago.“Jon was a catcher,” Glassmacher said. “He was like Yogi Berra back there,” joking and trash talking with teammates and to the batters.As a catcher, Bitman was “very effective” and always batted in the same spot in the lineup – last, Roskowinski said.During this year’s tournament there were six Little Silver teams, one from Rumson and another from Shrewsbury competing in a series of games with batters facing one pitch, which allowed for quite a few games during the day, Glassmacher said.The day was – and has been – more than about softball. Bitman always saw it as a sort of community day, with music, food, and activities for the kids.“Our motto is ‘there’s more to being a Croc than playing ball,’” Glassmacher said. “Like Jon, we’re very community-oriented.”“All I can say is Jon would have been the first person setting things up” and he always spent time behind the grill, said Little Silver resident Chris Curley. “He’s still here in spirit.”“It’s a sad day,” resident Cindy Mendoza said, “but it’s a good day.”Mendoza has been a “Crocette,” one of the women who help out, since the beginning. “I’m one of the originals,” she said as she sold 50/50 tickets.She acknowledged that residents of the borough are usually quick to answer the call for help when situations arise. “That’s what impressed me about this town,” she said. “People do step up.”Rich Movelle, who lives in Tinton Falls, played for the Rumson team. About six years ago the event was dedicated to helping a member of his team who was stricken with ALS. Movelle said that while he takes his softball seriously, “the game is not as important as the money to help the family.”“He did love the Crocs,” said Bitman’s sister, Paige Ascher of Maplewood.“And he always enjoyed a good burger,” said Russ Ascher, Paige’s husband, jokingly recalling his brother-in-law.“He would be the first one out here to help another person,” Paige Ascher said. “This really is a fitting tribute to him.”The proceeds raised throughout the day and afterward will go to help Bitman’s daughter, Cori, a college sophomore, continue her education, Roskowinski said.The fundraising had gone well and “exceeded our expectations,” Roskowinski said after the event.People can still contribute by mail to the Jon Bitman Memorial Fund, P.O. Box 143, Little Silver, NJ 07739; or through sites.google.com/site/lscrocs/home. By John BurtonJon Bitman remembered at softball tournamentlast_img read more

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Controversy Continues Over Charter School

first_imgBy John BurtonRED BANK – A meeting between members of the local press and charter school officials seemed to turn up the heat on the antagonism over the school’s expansion proposal.Principal Meredith Pennotti, Board of Trustees Vice President Roger Foss and school business administrator David Block met with four area reporters on Feb. 10 at the Red Bank Charter School, 58 Oakland St., to offer the school’s perspective on its plans.The school is currently awaiting state Commissioner of Education David Hespe’s decision on its proposal to double enrollment to 400 students over the next three years, as well as expanding its facility space.Charter school officials planned to use its own public forum held earlier this month at recently leased 135 Monmouth St. space to “give the press an open forum” in addition to giving community members a chance to be heard, and for the school to announce it would amend its plan to stagger the future enrollment for the town’s benefit, Pennotti said.But given the large number of people in attendance that night, officials thought it would be better to dedicate the bulk of the time to public comments.“We don’t feel like we met that goal,” of giving reporters a chance to ask questions, Pennotti said.But some countered that the press meeting was an attempt to manipulate local media, to sway public opinion given the vocal opposition the charter school has faced since its plans became public last December.“I just keep feeling they keep reporting the same things over and over without anybody requesting they substantiate their claims,” charged Jared Rumage, Red Bank superintendent of schools.Rumage and others have pointed out that the charter school had an opportunity to present their views at a Jan. 22 forum at the middle school and at their own forum as well, where school officials sat silent as community members spoke. Charter school officials at the last minute decided to decline the invitation to appear at the middle school event, leaving Rumage to present the public school’s point of view.The deadline to submit public comment on the charter school’s proposal to the commissioner of education was Jan. 31. Hespe’s decision is expected by the end of February.“We want to do more for the population of Red Bank,” Pennotti said of the school’s proposal. She pointed to her school’s continuing wait list, currently around 90 students. She added that the public school population is growing, with the schools “bursting at the seams.” She believed the expansion might offer some relief to the existing public school facility.The charter school’s application is on the school’s website and on record with the state Department of Education and available to the public.Much of the two-hour session revolved around points that the school has raised previously and countering some accusations from critics – which also have been expressed before.Rumage and others have said charter school students receive more money per student than their public school counterparts. But administrator Brock said that is misleading, given that actual dollars from the school district equates to less money per student than for the charter school students. The charter school receives an additional roughly a little more than $1 million in direct state aid.That, Rumage had countered, doesn’t negate the impact the charter school funding has on the public school district and what this expansion would mean for the public school and taxpayers – an often repeated refrain from opponents of the plan.“If this goes through, they’re failing to address this main concept,” Rumage said, “we will not be able to provide a thorough and efficient education for the kids who are left behind.”“The charter school is supposed to offer an alternative,” Pennotti offered another often repeated refrain of charter school supporters here and elsewhere. She said her school is providing innovative programs in a small school environment and offering families a choice, “That will attract families.”last_img read more

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Greenwood hosts second successful rugby bash

first_imgGreenwood was full of Rugby players again last weekend for the Boundary Bash Social 10s Rugby Tournament. This is the second year they have hosted this tournament and this year they were larger by just one team.Organizer and Jewel Lake resident Oliver Glaser said the tournament was a success, particularly in regards to the social aspect.Everyone had fun and the City of Greenwood opened up O’Hairi Park as a campsite for the rugby players, he said.This year’s teams included the East Vancouver Scribes, who technically hosted the event because Glaser still plays on their team, the Trail Colonials, the Grand Forks Wanderers, the Ridge Meadow Bruins (Maple Ridge) and the Nelson Grizzlies.The Grizzlies easily won the tournament because they won all their games and had the most ‘tries’ – goal attempts. There was only one woman’s team, which came from Ridge Meadows. The men’s teams played a few games with them and some of the woman joined the men’s teams and played along with them.“One woman player on the Grizzlies,” said Glaser, noting that she played exceptionally well. “She was fit and toned and ran hard. She ran really good lines.”The Trail Colonials were awarded the most social team and Bryan Louzon was awarded the most social player.Glaser said the games were all really good and that the level of play was strong this year. The players followed the rules and there was no kicking or fighting.Ingram Creek Saddlery donated a custom-made leather ball for the winning team again this year. Glaser said this makes them stand out from other tournaments.“It’s a really special thing,” he said.  New to the tournament this year was a kids touch game and a concession stand. They had about 100 people as spectators and everyone seemed to have a good time, said Glaser.The only real complaint was about the noise from the music at the campsite at night. Glaser said he hadn’t considered how much the noise would carry and that he would consider a noise curfew the next year.Glaser is hoping to host the event this year but says it depends on what the numbers look like after they have done their calculations. He is happy if they are just able to break even because it’s all about having fun, but if the host team has lost a lot of money they may not host it again next year.last_img read more

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Meralco takes 2-0 lead

first_imgPBA IMAGESSTA. ROSA, LAGUNA—The Meralco Bolts turned a supposed showdown into nothing more than a showcase of their collective prowess.With their offense clicking, the Bolts throttled the Star Hotshots, 98-74, Tuesday night in a crucial road trip in the PBA Governors Cup playoffs at Sta. Rosa Multipurpose Complex.ADVERTISEMENT And handing TNT a second straight semifinal loss is exactly what defending champion Barangay Ginebra will try to do when it takes the floor against the Texters Wednesday in Batangas City.Game time is 7 p.m.The Gin Kings hammered the Texters in Game 1, 121-94, flashing the form that helped them send off Grand Slam-seeking San Miguel Beer in the quarterfinals. The win gave Ginebra a 1-0 edge in the best-of-five series and sent TNT scrambling for solutions to avoid falling into a 0-2 hole.“We have a lot of things to work on,” Racela said. “We were outplayed, we were out-coached, and we were out-hustled. Hopefully, [we can] correct everything [in Game 2].”Meralco certainly didn’t need to correct anything from its Game 1 performance.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City Read Next Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary View comments Azkals fly to Doha seeking maximum points Energetic guards Chris Newsome, Baser Amer and Mike Tolomia set the tone for the rout, shooting accurately from every angle that helped the Bolts race to an early 22-point lead in a wire-to-wire finish.The narrative of the one-sided contest hardly altered after that big bubble with Durham doing all things necessary as the reigning best import established himself not only as a defender but as a scoring threat as well.Star’s Kris Acox had no answer for Durham, who unceasingly collected rebounds on both ends, challenged every Hotshot attempt in the lane and hammered his bulky frame inside.Star coach Chito Victolero threw in the towel and pulled the overmatched Acox out of the battlefield early in the third with the Bolts piling on the lead to eventually reach the 30-point mark. For the second straight game, Acox failed to score in double figures.Making matters worse for the Hotshots, Paul Lee only showed up on the floor briefly in the opening period and rode the bench throughout with a battered right knee.Fiery playmaker Gio Jalalon also couldn’t get his high-scoring act going as well as fellow guard PJ Simon. Mark Barroca contributed 16 points but that hardly mattered.Meralco can now go for a sweep in their series in Game 3 on Thursday.Ginebra will try to put TNT in the same dire situation as Star’s and import Justin Brownlee, who had 21 points, eight rebounds, five assists and three steals in Game 1, hopes that their rout of the Texters won’t result in a laid-back Kings squad in Game 2.“We know TNT is a tough team,” he said. “They will come out and make adjustments and we just got to be prepared. Whatever we’re running, we just gotta run it with great purpose and do what we want to do. We’ll try to keep defending them the best way we can and try to force them into things they don’t usually do.” Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  Allen Durham was virtually unchallenged all game long, scoring 18 points, grabbing 25 rebounds and tallying four rebounds and three blocks as Meralco’ s overpowering performance gave the Bolts a 2-0 lead in their best-of-five series.Star now needs to win three straight games to keep its bid alive and deny Meralco a semifinal berth.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutIt is a predicament TNT hopes to avoid because as far as coach Nash Racela is concerned, there’s no two ways about it: The Texters have to shape up or they’ll soon be shipping out.“If [we’re] not better come Wednesday, we’ll lose two straight. It’s that simple,” he said. Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. LATEST STORIESlast_img read more

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Green patch at Philippines

first_imgA panoramic view of the Chocolate Hills”Did you manage to find anything on the net?” I asked with eyes wide shut. The query was directed to my elderly companion from Mumbai, seated across the narrow aisle on the ageing Airbus.”Not much. I hope they have spelt it right on the itinerary,” came the rejoinder.”Aaah… I guess it has to be all wait and watch in Tagbilaran,” I concluded, still adamant on keeping the world out of sight. What led things to such a pass was the turbulent weather which trailed us right from Manila. The lukewarm smiles of the cabin crew did little to alleviate my aerophobia and the only distraction I found was in the quaintness of the destination. A place called Tagbilaran that throws up only a handful of coherent results on the world’s most trusted search engine. And after exchanging notes with all eight travellers in the group, I found myself exactly where I started.The smooth road to the Chocolate HillsI ran through the sketchy details as the aircraft oscillated with alarming precision: Tagbilaran is the principal city of Bohol, a small island near the southern end of the Philippine archipelago. Less than two hours away from Manila, this lush island has come up as a promising ecotourism destination in the last decade.An announcement by the captain finally compelled me to open my eyes. “Look out of the window for the Chocolate Hills… we are flying above them now. But please don’t be disappointed that the hills are now green, not chocolate in colour…” the voice trailed off while some of us craned our necks to admire what the captain had dutifully drawn our attention to. And of course the hills were green. That shade of green one finds only in places where it rains heavily. The colour, quite frankly, was not important enough to whet my curiosity. What suitably captured my attention was the shape of the hills spread out on the scenic canvas below us. Gumdrops? Turtle shells? I searched for more descriptors even as we lost the pretty picture to a carpet of grey clouds.A cruise boat on the LobocThe grey notwithstanding, I felt resuscitated enough to look forward to the overnight sojourn at Tagbilaran. Walking through sheets of rain into the coach, I quickly devoted my rested eyes to the brochures I had collected from Cecilia, our guide in Bohol. While some in the group contemplated a lazy afternoon at the beachside resort, the rest of us filed back into the coach for a river cruise. It was on the way to the jetty that I first turned my eyes to the place I was in. To be honest, it looked nothing more than a tropical island village. Roads lined with coconut trees, modest huts breaking the monotony of velvety green rice fields, a chapel or two and a town square sporting a cluster of shops and eateries in haphazard arrangement.It was, however, this very unpretentiousness that distinguished Bohol. A world apart from the glitz and cacophony of Manila’s malls–of which we’d had our fill in the last three days–the island’s main attractions can be safely put at three: the tarsier, perhaps the world’s tiniest primate; the forests that guard Loboc river and the curious hills aforementioned. A tarsier stares back at the cameraIt took only a minute-long discussion to change our course of action. Instead of the jetty, we were headed for a tarsier reserve near Corella, about 15 km from Tagbilaran. As we drove up canopied roads, I stole a glance at the primate on the glossy brochure. A pair of bulging eyes, as glazed as glazed can get, stared right back. Though the seemingly cute, furry creature promised to be no bigger in size than half my palm, the brochures fittingly warned us against its nocturnal and predatory traits. In a matter of 15 minutes, I stood face to face with the first tarsier. It was everything that we were promised and described. It clung effortlessly to the slim tree stem while silently challenging everyone to an impromptu round of Who Blinks First. The stillness of its beady eyes led me to doubt if the creature was not a stuffed one. Perhaps reading my cynical mind, it turned its neck an inch to the right, drawing gasps of admiration from all. The path to the Chocolate Hills viewing gallery is skirted with greenery”Don’t use the flash,” the guide announced as we herded behind him to greet the second tarsier of the day. The tiny reserve, which takes barely half an hour to cover by foot, echoed with exclamatory sounds each time we spotted the primate. Back on the artificial hanging bridge across a pool in the reserve, I happily took stock of how many tarsiers I had captured in my camera. And with enough memory space for the cruise up the Loboc, I sprinted towards the coach.Squeals of excitement and strains of music from other cruise boats greeted us as we disembarked at the jetty. The river of green, aptly surrounded by rainforest-like greenery, seemed all we needed to erase the last trace of mall-weariness. And Loboc, not to forget the hospitable crew on board the modest vessel, lived up to every expectation. As I settled down to a lunch of Chicken Adobo and rice, the young singer on board triggered a pleasant journey down the retro lane. Harry Belafonte joined the cruise as did the Beatles and Frank Sinatra. Torn between the crooner’s magical voice and the captivating scenery upriver, I struggled to be fair to both. But it wasn’t long before the latter scored over the other. Leaning against the wooden railing, I trained my lens on the gigantic trees that lay splayed across the banks. The foliage was one of the thickest I’d seen and I soon regretted not carrying my binoculars for a closer look at the huts on stilts that lined the course.Young girls do a jig on a tourism raft on the LobocFriendly locals, dressed in bright pinks and blues, waved back even as they sipped coconut wine, the local brew, from bottles. And before long, the boat stood inches away from a mini cascade at the heart of the Loboc. We waited a good ten minutes, soaking in the quiet, tranquil beauty of the jungle and the river. Our next stop, on the river itself, was a couple of ‘tourism’ rafts. Anchored to the sides of the river, these rafts were anything but as boring as their names. These are in fact used by the local community as stage. So there was song, dance and smiles galore. Men and women strummed the banduria, the Philippine mandolin, with great gusto while teenagers danced with gay abandon. Happy with whatever we stuffed into the small wooden donation boxes, they saw us off with more music that still ring in my ears.The ride downstream was equally relaxing. What followed next was a dash to the Chocolate Hills, up snaking roads flanked by mammoth trees. The rain-sodden paths reminded of pleasant drives up north in India and I silently agreed as some of my companions compared the scenery to those in Indian hill stations. An hour after bidding farewell to Loboc, I said hello to the Chocolate Hills, for the second time that day. And what I saw before my eyes truly defied logic. A view of the dense forests that run along the course of the LobocThe Unesco website describes the wonder thus: “… the symmetrical and same-sized hills known as the Chocolate Hills… were the uplift of coral deposits and the result of the action of rainwater and erosion. The hills are located throughout the towns of Carmen, Batuan and Sagbayan and consist of about 1,776 mounds of the same general shape. During the dry season when precipitation in inadequate, the grass-covered hills turn chocolate brown, hence the name in reference to a branded confection.”From the viewing gallery–an easy climb of not more than 15 minutes–the mounds looked like cowrie shells scattered across a moss green carpet. I watched in amusement as tourists posed for souvenir photos against a hand-painted backdrop of the hills. While some rode a broom for the Potter-esque touch, others chose to jump across the screen. Farmlands melded with coconut plantations in creating the most alluring mosaic around the hills. And wild blooms, as bright as the costumes I found myself surrounded with, highlighted the natural abundance that Bohol was all about. That’s when pangs of regret gripped my heart. My time here was coming to an end. Thankfully, though, I could still look forward to dinner–at a bee farm, amid acres of greenery and all-organic. Just the tonic I need before I head to another city. Trailing the TarsierThis one is for the adventurous. If you want more than just spotting tarsier spotting in the Corella reserve, you can go for a 15-km hike on the Tarsier Trail. This walkway in the rolling hills, north of Tagbilaran, links the towns of Corella, Sikatuna and Loboc. Remember to carry good walking shoes, insect repellent and hat for the trek. For details, visit www.tarsierfoundation.orgFact fileGetting there: Fly Delhi/Mumbai-Bangkok-Manila on Thai Airways Fare: Rs. 35,000 approx. Tagbilaran, Bohol’s only airport, is connected to Manila.When to go: Early winter is the best time to visit. Avoid the rainy season.Plus saysStay: Bohol Tropics; Graham Avenue, Tagbilaran City; e-mail: [email protected]: Have at least one meal at the Bohol Bee Farm. Among other delicious items, the honey glazed chicken and the homemade avocado ice-cream are absolute must-trys. To book a table, visit www.boholbeefarm.comShop: Pick up a bottle of coconut wine or a banduria, the local mandolin, as souvenir.See: Go snorkeling or scuba diving off Panglao Island.Courtesy: Travel Plusadvertisementadvertisementadvertisementlast_img read more

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Man 66 charged with firstdegree murder in disappearance of two Toronto men

first_imgTORONTO – Months after dismissing growing fears about a potential serial killer prowling Toronto’s gay village, police said Thursday they have arrested a man they believe is responsible for the presumed deaths of at least two men who disappeared from the neighbourhood.Bruce McArthur, a 66-year-old Toronto man, was arrested and charged with first-degree murder Thursday morning in the presumed deaths of Selim Esen and Andrew Kinsman, both reported missing from the Church and Wellesley streets area at separate times last year, police said.“We believe he is responsible for the deaths of Mr. Esen and Mr. Kinsman, and we believe he is responsible for the deaths of other men who have yet to be identified,” said Det. Sgt. Hank Idsinga.“In other words, we believe there are other victims,” he said. Idsinga would not say who the other victims may be, but said police are aware of other men reported missing from the area.Members of the LGBTQ community were voicing concerns and pushing for answers last year in light of the disappearances, which were deemed suspicious at the time.Investigators working on the cases issued public reassurances, saying they had no reason to believe the two men were dead, nor that their absence had anything to do with a serial killer or predators targeting men through a dating app.In December, police warned people to be careful using dating apps.Toronto Police Chief Mark Saunders defended the force’s approach when asked about the shift Thursday.“In policing, what we do is we follow the evidence and what I said at the time that I said (it) was accurate at that time,” he said. He thanked the Church and Wellesley community for its help, saying the ongoing communication had raised awareness and given the investigation more focus.Helen Kennedy, executive director of the LGBTQ advocacy group Egale, said news of the arrest brought relief after months of fear and apprehension.“The community, especially in the village, were very, very nervous, and rightly so. Two gay men went missing and the circumstances around their disappearances were very suspect and so people were speculating about what had happened to these two guys,” she said.“I think that we had every right to be afraid and nervous, but at the same time, the police need time to do their work,” she said.Officers had been investigating McArthur for months but could not make a “definitive link” to the disappearances until Wednesday, Idsinga said.The men’s bodies have not been found, but police said they were combing through five properties — four in Toronto, one in Madoc, Ont. — connected to McArthur, a self-employed landscaper.Provincial police were searching a rural property north of Madoc Thursday evening.A Canadian Press photographer at the scene said there were at least two police cruisers and two officers on the property.Calls to the local provincial police detachment were not returned.Idsinga said police have a “pretty good idea” of how the men died but would not elaborate, citing the ongoing investigation.McArthur had sexual relationships with both men and all three were on dating apps, he said.“He did have a relationship with Mr. Kinsman for some time,” Idsinga said.“We don’t know what his exact relationship with Mr. Esen was leading up to the (alleged) murder, whether he had just met him that day or whether he had known him for some time, we just don’t know that yet.”A separate project is probing the disappearance of three men who went missing from the same area between 2010 and 2012.last_img read more

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Fundraiser for Fort St John Firefighters Charitable Society

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – JD Knives and Custom Works and Northern Hydrographics FSJ have come together to raise funds to support the Fort St. John Charitable Society(FSJFFCS).Through the collection of donations, each $20.00 gives you an opportunity to choose one of two custom gifts while raising money to help support families throughout the Peace Region needing assistance covering medical costs and travel expenses.JD Knives and Custom Works are offering a Custom San Mai JD Bird & Trout 6” knife with the retail value of $700 and an (FSJFFCS) challenge coin. Each suggested entry of $20.00 will enter your name in the draw.The draw date will be Tuesday, May 21, 2019To view JD Knives and Custom Works; CLICK HERETo view Northern Hydrographics FSJ; CLICK HERE Northern Hydrographics FSJ is offering a customized firefighters helmet valued at over $500.Donations can be made in person to the following locations;JD Knives & Custom WorksUnit 8 10404 101 ave.Fort St. John, BCNorthern HydrographicsUnit 9 10404 101 ave.Fort St. John, BCFort St. John Fire Department9312 93 Ave, Fort St John, BCOr by E-transfers which can be sent to [email protected] with the password: “knife”last_img read more

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CBI raids premises of YSRCP MP candidate for Rs 947 cr bank

first_imgNew Delhi: The Central Bureau of Investigation on Tuesday raided premises belonging to a YSRCP’s Narsapuram MP candidate in Hyderabad in connection with a Rs 947 crore bank fraud case, officials here said.The agency registered a case against Raghurama Kishnam Raju and his company Ind-Barath Power Limited on Monday. Agency sleuths conducted searches at two of his residences and four offices of his company that lasted almost all day. The FIR registered in the case accuses Raju’s company of taking loans of up to Rs 2,655 crore from three public lenders, namely Power Finance Corporation (PFC), Rural Electrification Corporation, and India Finance Corporation. Also Read – 2019 most peaceful festive season for J&K: Jitendra SinghSources said that the loans were sanctioned for Raju’s company to undertake power projects in various parts of the country, but it was found that IBPL siphoned off Rs 947 crore of the loans to a third party. The agency’s FIR also mentions Axis Bank as an accused in the case. According to the complaint registered by PFC and other lenders, the bank was supposed to hold a trust account in IBPL’s name to protect the interest of lenders involved. However, after repeated amendments to the agreement between the borrower and lenders, Axis Bank allegedly did not follow procedure and allowed IBPL to transfer funds from the account on multiple occasions. The complaint to the CBI mentions that IBPL transferred more than Rs 357 crore to a third party, Sokeo Power Limited. While the lenders were made aware of this, IBPL and Sokeo allegedly entered into a conspiracy and signed a separate MoU that allowed Sokeo to send the funds back to Raju’s company without any liability. Raju is a Lok Sabha candidate from Narsapuram in Andhra Pradesh, which went to polls on April 11.last_img read more

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