Scottish training centre open to all

first_imgThe Scottish Association of Master Bakers’ (SAMB’s) new training centre in Larbert is now fully equipped and ready for business.The centre at Mathieson’s bakery near Falkirk is open to everyone in the UK baking trade, not just Scottish bakers, and has taken two years to develop. It comprises a test bakery, eight computers and seminar and conference rooms.Courses can run for up to 70 people and ADM Milling, which is among those who have supported the centre, will be one of the first to deliver a technical course.At the SAMB conference in May, Iain Campbell, convenor of the training and education committee, urged the industry to make the most of the new facility.”Use it or lose it,” he said. “Everyone within travelling distance, both sides of the border, should make use of the new facility.”The centre is close to the M9 and is accessible by train from Edinburgh and Glasgow, with Edinburgh airport 30 minutes away.Arthur Rayer, head of skills training for the SAMB, said: “We hope the industry will support a range of courses and that it will become a hub of learning, used by manufacturers and suppliers alike.”George Stevenson of Mathieson, who is the new vice president of the SAMB, and John Murray, past president who oversaw the development of the training centre, were thanked at conference for their efforts.Meanwhile, the SAMB 40 Group for bakers aged 40 and under will celebrate its 50th anniversary in September 2008.l See pg 14 for coverage of the SAMB technical sessions.last_img read more

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City North makes maiden purchase for £6m

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Kurzawa extends PSG deal until 2024

first_imgRelatedPosts Runarsson joins Arsenal on four-year deal Ighalo: My best moment as ‘Red Devil’ Arsenal, Wolves want Michael Olise Layvin Kurzawa has put pen to paper on a new deal with Paris Saint-Germain until the summer of 2024.Back in January, the left back had been heavily linked with a move to Arsenal in the Premier League and his future at the Parc des Princes appeared almost over. However, just as his contract was set to expire, Kurzawa has now signed a new four-year contract with the Ligue 1 giants – keeping him in Paris until 2024.Arsenal had been monitoring Kurzawa’s position at PSG with Mikel Arteta eyeing defensive reinforcements as he looks to rejuvenate his squad following an extremely turbulent season.But Kurzawa has ended any speculation over his future after committing to the French giants in the long-term.The 27-year-old has featured 123 times for PSG since joining the club back in 2015 from Ligue 1 counterparts Monaco.He has scored 13 goals, including a hat-trick against Anderlecht in the Champions League in 2017, while providing 21 assists during that time. After making the move to the French capital five years ago, Kurzawa has won four Ligue 1 titles, three French Cups and three League Cups.Tags: ArsenalLayvin KurzawaParis Saint-GermainPremier Leaguelast_img read more

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Syracuse benefitting from video review, wants system expanded to all games

first_img Published on November 7, 2017 at 9:45 pm Contact Anthony: [email protected] Up 20-19 in the second set against Georgia Tech on Oct. 8, Syracuse lost a point after an out call on a Santita Ebangwese kill attempt.Or so the Orange thought. Head coach Leonid Yelin immediately went up to the second referee, challenging the call. Because the game was televised, the call was reviewed, and Ebangwese’s ball was ruled in bounds.What would have been a tie game in a critical second set became a two-point Orange lead. SU ended up winning the set by two.Syracuse (17-10, 9-5 Atlantic Coast) has benefited from the challenge system this season, but Yelin is not satisfied. With the technology now frequently available, he wants to see the ACC expanding replay to every game, not just those that are televised. Often, a few key points can decide a match and millimeters make the difference between winning and losing a point.The challenge replay system was first introduced to volleyball at the Rio Olympics in 2016, after it was tested across international play in 2014 and 2015. In fall 2015, both the Big Ten and PAC-12 adopted the challenge system, and now it has expanded to other conferences.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textWhenever WatchESPN or the ACC Network televises games, coaches could review any point. For Yelin, this serves as a failsafe, protecting against referee mistakes that occur due to the fast-paced nature of the sport.“The level of the game got so much better, and unfortunately,” Yelin said, “a lot of referees are behind this game.”When replay is available, coaches can challenge four types of calls. The most common is on in-out decisions. Coaches can also challenge a touch off a player, a service-foot fault or an illegal net touch during a point.Coaches receive three challenges per match, and can use them as they please. Even if a coach gets the challenge right, they still sacrifice one of the challenges. Yelin prefers that the NCAA adapt to the overseas rule.“They have two challenges every set,” Yelin said, “and if you challenge and are right you don’t lose a challenge.”For senior Belle Sand, who played years without the challenge system, video replay has come as a huge relief for her and other players. When they are nervously standing around anticipating the call, it can kill the flow of the game. But, Sand said, getting the call right is more important than the time lost.“I love challenges, it’s a huge momentum shift,” Sand said. “I get pumped when we win the challenges because there are some bad calls that referees make and it would be really frustrating knowing it was wrong.”The system is not perfect because indisputable video evidence is required for the second referee to overturn the call. With only one official looking at the replay, there is no room for debate and discussion among the officials.Also, logistically, Syracuse would need additional staff on site, along with cameras, to make the challenge system accessible for all games. This would require additional funding from the conference, Yelin said. Despite the additional costs, Yelin believes in prioritizing video review for the quality of volleyball.“Coaches and players are putting so much time and effort and one mistake can cost the match and so many hours and days,” Yelin said. “In the end, we want the kids to win or lose because of the game, not because of a referee mistake.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Next up for the Raiders: Unbeaten Miami and 5 reasons to remain hopeful

first_imgClick HERE if you’re having trouble viewing the gallery on your mobile device.The Raiders were embarrassed in their opener against the Rams. They (and their fans) were stunned Sunday by the Broncos.Don’t take my word for it:Raiders fans after starting 0-2 in this Gruden era. pic.twitter.com/h8QVNlfRFj — Bleacher Report (@BleacherReport) September 16, 2018There’s no sugar-coating it — the Raiders had the Broncos beat, and, just guessing here, the only noise on the flight home …last_img

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Sharks edged by Hurricanes in shootout

first_imgRALEIGH, N.C. — The Sharks are no longer perfect in overtimes and shootouts this season.Andrei Svechnikov scored in the third round of the shootout and Logan Couture could not answer at the other end as the Sharks lost 3-2 to the Carolina Hurricanes on Thursday at PNC Arena.The Sharks entered Thursday with a 5-0 record when games entered overtime. But after both teams failed to score in the five-minute extra session, both Kevin Labanc and Erik Karlsson could not score in the first two rounds …last_img

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Yahoo! and Total Immersion Bring Augmented Reality to the Olympics

first_imgRelated Posts 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People… chris cameron Tags:#Augmented Reality#web 5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnoutcenter_img 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App 9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex… At the 2006 Winter Olympics in Torino, Italy, digital advertising development studio Inition brought augmented reality (AR) to the games with a promotion they produced for Samsung which gave users a unique look at a new device from the company. With thousands of people flocking to Vancouver for this year’s Olympics, the games have again taken to augmented reality for some unique and immersive marketing opportunities.Yahoo! and top AR development house Total Immersion have teamed up to provide an interactive information kiosk at the “Yahoo! Fancouver” exhibit. The experience involves a three paneled screen with sections for news, weather and medal counts, along with a camera pointed at the user. Depending on where the user is standing, the AR software will place various hats and accessories on their head; ie: a press hat for the news section, or hats with country logos on them for the medal count section. The weather section places various weather related accessories on the user, such as wool caps, visors, sunglasses, and goofy umbrella hats. Vancouver-based social media blogger, author and speaker Shane Gibson snapped the video below demonstrating the interactive AR display which is located in Yaletown, a borough within the Canadian city.The experience, which also supports some brochure tracking features, is an entertaining way to draw the attention of the event’s attendees while also providing them with useful information about the games. Facial tracking is nothing new for Total Immersion, who provided similar services for a Transformers promotion that placed a robotic helmet on users’ heads. Others AR developers have used facial tracking for applications as well, including metaio’s hockey mask promotion at the Xcel Energy Center in Minneapolis, and FittingBox’s “virtual mirror” for Ray Ban Sunglasses. The thing I like about this example of facial tracking AR is that – like the Ray Ban promotion – it provides a practical service along with the entertaining and interactive aspect. Users aren’t simply walking up to a screen an having a 2010 Olympics hat stuck on their head, much like the Transformers or hockey mask promotions. Yes, the hats and accessories are a bit silly, but the addition of news, weather and medal count information makes the use more practical. The AR draws the attention of passers-by with its fun and gimmicks, but rewards them with actual useful information to take with them. A user walks away knowing what countries lead the medal count and what the weather will be like based on the AR hats that were placed on them.I wouldn’t be surprised to see a hat manufacturer like NewEra take note of this promotion and provide an interactive way for potential customers to model their various hat styles with either an in-store kiosk or with an at-home web-based solution. Facial and body tracking is an excellent use of augmented reality for fashion retailers, as we have already seen applications for users to try on sun glasses, shoes, clothing, jewelry, make-up and hairstyles. Imagine the private dressing rooms at department stores being replaced by AR “virtual mirrors” for a faster, more social way to try on new outfits. The possibilities are endless, but what or who will be next? last_img read more

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One-Second Video Apps? What The Number Of Seconds In Your Videos Says About You

first_imgIn all of these attributes, the six seconds of Vine are meant to provide a window for other viewers to inhabit a fleeting instant behind another person’s pair of eyes, a very Being John Malkovich moment indeed. Six seconds is just enough time to create a compelling story, to pack enough information about an occurrence, to show viewers what had just happened. I’ve made the mistake of joking once about a one-second video app. To me, one-second videos just seemed so out of touch with reality, and yet so in the trend of ultra-short mobile video platforms that a one-second app would statistically, and satirically, be the next best thing to do.Only a week later, I would flip through a magazine to see that Drew Barrymore just loves using her one-second video app. What? It was like the bad moment in a horror movie when the punk kid who sneers at Freddy Krueger only ends up getting swiftly annihilated in a vengeance killing.I realized— oh. It’s here. It’s already here.1 Second Everyday is an app that lets users record one second of every day of their lives, effectively creating a lifetime supercut for the purpose of capturing and evoking memories. One second, the app stresses, is all it takes to bring back a whole day’s events. And it’s taking off. Creator Cesar Kuriyama states that his app’s downloads are in the hundreds of thousands.The reality of a one-second app shouldn’t have come as such a surprise. Every new video application attaches another seemingly arbitrary number of seconds to cap off the clip. Instagram Video’s is 15, and Vine’s is six. The new video record-and-edit app MixBit’s is 16.But what do these numbers actually mean, if anything? What do the seconds in a clip say about what and how much one can convey, about the process of creation, about the user themselves?Vine’s video technology itself is not new, but the format is revolutionized when the users are given limitations to what they can do. Like Instagram and Twitter before it, a confine to what can be created only fosters creativity. Uniform photos, 140 characters, six seconds—through constructing boundaries to work within, they’re giving users a challenge.Vine users have stepped up to the plate. The app is notorious for the culture that has thrived since its inception, a grassroots movement spurred by competition, creativity and early-adopting youth.But highly produced, artistic videos are not Vine’s mainstay. The essence of “The Now,” and the instant gratification of immediate share-ability is what users tend to explore in their videos, capturing raw, unedited, in-the-moment slices of life. The app has been used to record and share certain cultural moments as well, making Vine videos a tool for real-time and citizen journalism. Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement One second, it turns out, is just for you. 1 Second Everyday also provides a window, but only for the user to look back into the past. The app lets users take a one second video of every day of their lives, which the app then sutures together to create a supercut of the user’s month, year, generation.Of course, other people can view the compilation, but one second is just not long enough to convey an accurate story about that day for an outsider’s eyes. The app’s main purpose is to reveal a window for the user themselves to look in and shed light on the past, a tool to trigger memory.Kuriyama states, “I have seconds that look incredibly boring, but represent ridiculously meaningful events in my life, and I have seconds that look gorgeous, but may have been relatively insignificant days of my life. Each second is a secret code to myself that only I know the hidden meaning of.”According to Kuriyama, viewing one second of an event is just enough time to evoke a whole memory of an event, or an entire day. Recording just one second of an occasion also lets users spend their extra time not recording or not taking photos to be present and experience the moment as is.A five-second difference in video length between Vine and 1 Second Everyday might not seem to amount to a lot, and in the physical sense, it does not.But the truth is, it’s harder to film short. It’s more difficult to convey a story in six seconds or in one second. The basics have to stay in, and clarity is a must. The questions then become how and who? How does one creatively and intelligently fit enough information into a few-seconds clip? And who is watching?If you are seeking to share an experience, a few more seconds to unpack the moment will be necessary. If the viewer is just you, you might only need one second to convey all the message you need.Images and video courtesy of Geeks Hut, 1 Second Everyday, The Cupcake Dude What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech …center_img The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology Related Posts stephanie ellen chan Tags:#1 Second Everyday#video apps#Vine last_img read more

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Touchline – Issue 15

first_imgTouch Football Australia sponsor, Sportscover, is proud to release the 15th edition of Touchline, the journal of sport and risk with an international perspective. In this edition, Sportscover has introduced some new features, including:–       At Risk: A new feature which highlights recent news stories about some of the accidents and injuries that occur in the sport and leisure world. –       Extra content: The interview with Triathlon World Champion, Peter Robertson is available on YouTube and as a Podcast, along with additional YouTube content. To view this edition of Touchline, please click on the following link:http://www.sportscover.com/touchline.asp Related LinksTouchline Journallast_img

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