Study: Ibuprofen cuts Parkinson’s risk

first_imgA new study by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers shows that adults who regularly take ibuprofen, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), reduce their risk of developing Parkinson’s disease by about one-third compared with nonusers.“There is no cure for Parkinson’s disease, so the possibility that ibuprofen, an existing and relatively nontoxic drug, could help protect against the disease is captivating,” said senior author Alberto Ascherio, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at HSPH.The study will be published online March 2 in Neurology and is scheduled to appear in the March 8 print issue.Parkinson’s disease, a progressive central nervous system disease occurring generally after age 50, affects at least half a million Americans, according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. About 50,000 new cases are reported each year, with the number expected to increase as the U.S. population ages. It is hypothesized that ibuprofen may reduce inflammation in the brain that may contribute to the disease. Prior studies showed a reduced Parkinson’s disease risk among NSAIDS users, but most did not differentiate between ibuprofen and other nonaspirin NSAIDs.In the new study, Ascherio, lead author Xiang Gao, research scientist at HSPH and associate epidemiologist in the Channing Laboratory at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and colleagues analyzed data from nearly 99,000 women enrolled in the Brigham and Women’s Hospital-based Nurses’ Health Study and more than 37,000 men in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study. The researchers identified 291 cases (156 men and 135 women) of Parkinson’s disease during their six-year follow-up study (1998-2004 in women; 2000-2006 in men). Based on questionnaires, the researchers analyzed the patients’ use of ibuprofen (e.g., Advil, Motrin, Nuprin), aspirin or aspirin-containing products, other anti-inflammatory pain relievers (e.g., Aleve, Naprosyn), and acetaminophen (e.g., Tylenol). (Although not an NSAID, acetaminophen was included because it’s similarly used to treat pain.) Age, smoking, diet, caffeine, and other variables also were considered.“We observed that men and women who used ibuprofen two or more times per week were about 38 percent less likely to develop Parkinson’s disease than those who regularly used aspirin, acetaminophen, or other NSAIDs,” Gao said. “Our findings suggest that ibuprofen could be a potential neuroprotective agent against Parkinson’s disease, however, the exact mechanism is unknown.”These findings raise hope that a readily available, inexpensive drug could help to treat Parkinson’s disease. “Because the loss of brain cells that leads to Parkinson’s disease occurs over a decade or more, a possible explanation of our findings is that use of ibuprofen protects these cells. If so, use of ibuprofen could help slow the disease’s progression,” Gao said.The findings do not mean that people who already have Parkinson’s disease should begin taking ibuprofen, Ascherio said. “Although generally perceived as safe, ibuprofen can have side effects, such as increased risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. Whether this risk is compensated by a slowing of the disease progression should be investigated under rigorous supervision in a randomized clinical trial,” he said.Support for the study was provided by the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and the Intramural Research Program of NIH’s National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.last_img read more

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Istria achieved a historically record June

first_imgThe Tourist Board of the Istrian County is especially proud to announce that Istria will realize more than 4 million overnight stays for the first time in June. Last year, Istria realized 3 million overnight stays in June, so that this year’s result in June will be almost 37 percent stronger, which in concrete figures means more than a million overnight stays for the month of June alone.With such figures before and after the season they look much better and after many years of systematic work, excellent cooperation between the private and public sector, joint work of all stakeholders in preparing the tourist season and constantly improving the living conditions of our guests, we obviously return the effort. – point out from the Tourist Board of the Istrian CountyIstria thus proves that it is a well-organized and organized tourist destination, and a large role in the whole story is played by the private sector which has designed a very high quality offer with the affected price and invested significantly in raising the quality of accommodation and organizing large TOP events such as: Swatch Beach Volleyball Major Series, Open Air Festival, Beach Polo in Rovinj, Sea Star Festival in Umag, Rise Up Festival in Porec and many others that in the pre- and post-season become a motive for the arrival of many guests and generate quality content in tourist destinations.last_img read more

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Neighbors look after one another to combat COVID-19 in Central Java

first_imgThe community has regularly received lettuce, eggplant and pepper seeds after communicating its plans to the province’s food agency and has also been breeding catfish.Read also: Regional leaders call on everyone to play role in overcoming pandemicThe residents also initiated a drawing and coloring program to keep their children entertained during the pandemic.”Kids put their drawing and coloring papers in front of their houses and judges [selected from among the adults in the neighborhood] tour the neighborhood,” Qunut said. “We also prepared snack hampers and asked parents to give them to their children.”RW 5 is only one example of how neighbors are helping each other using the Jogo Tonggo approach in Central Java, which has fluctuated between the fifth and fourth hardest-hit province.“We encourage communities to embody their local values. They does not have to be alike and share the same [program] name in each area, but one might inspire another,” Governor Ganjar Pranowo said in an exclusive interview on Friday.Ganjar said his administration did not have sufficient funds and resources to impose PSBB measures for a long period of time, and hence had decided to empower communities at the grassroots level to adapt to the current situation.”Let’s put our trust in society. There is potential social power that has yet to be utilized there,” Ganjar said, adding that the enforcement of strict measures by authorities would instead create unnecessary fear among the residents.Doubts over the efficacy of the Jogo Tonggo program, however, remain as the number of COVID-19 cases in Central Java continues to rise, reaching 3,482 cases with 150 deaths as of Saturday, the fourth highest tally in the country.Read also: Indonesia’s latest official COVID-19 figuresGanjar said only 30 percent of the province’s 7,809 villages were actively reporting their Jogo Tonggo activities.“We actually have so many shortcomings. This [Jogo Tonggo program] is only reaching about 30 percent [of communities]. But, I’d say even a single inspiration [from the movement] would be very meaningful,” he said, adding that he would continue promoting videos of Jogo Tonggo activities via his social media accounts “to inspire” others.The province saw three areas with relatively high rates of new cases compared to other regions of Central Java, namely Semarang city, Magelang regency and Temanggung regency, according to Ganjar.“In these areas, local administrations have intensified contact tracing, rapid [antibody] testing and swab [polymerase chain reaction] testing,” he said.Central Java had also recorded a higher death rate among confirmed cases and patients under surveillance (PDPs), at 7.87 percent and 13.66 percent, respectively, as of Saturday, compared to East Java and Jakarta – the two provinces with the most cases.Read also: Semarang wedding party contributes to COVID-19 spikeBut Ganjar said Central Java has sufficient hospital capacity, adding that many of the deaths occurred in patients with comorbidities.He said his administration was now working to cut the time it took to receive test results, from 10 days to two days, to allow hospitals to better manage their patients and prioritize treatment for COVID-19 patients.“Those most vulnerable will get priority, which we hope will lower the fatality rate,” Ganjar said.Epidemiologist Riris Andono Ahmad from Gadjah Mada University said the effectiveness of COVID-19 social interventions did not largely depend on the nature of the approaches – whether they be voluntary like Jogo Tonggo or more mandatory like the PSBB.He said the results would vary between regions depending on the characteristics of the society, meaning efforts in certain provinces might yield different outcomes than if the same measures were implemented in Central Java, and vice versa.”What is important is whether it can motivate people to maintain distance between each other,” he said. “As long as the efforts are adjusted to local contexts, they could be effective. But society is a very dynamic system and sometimes things work but, at different times, they don’t. A periodic evaluation is highly needed.”Topics : Central Java, home to more than 30 million people, has chosen a different approach to handle the COVID-19 outbreak rather than imposing large-scale social restrictions (PSBB) like many other regions across Indonesia.Instead, it has come up with its own strategy dubbed Jogo Tonggo (neighbors looking after each other), a community movement program in which people collaborate to ensure people maintain physical distance, manage food supplies and help others in response to the pandemic. Residents of community unit RW 5 of Jomblang subdistrict in Candisari, Semarang, are among the Central Java communities that have been implementing Jogo Tonggo in the past few months.More than three-quarters of RW 5’s residents work in the informal sector, mostly as day laborers and street vendors. Since the coronavirus pandemic hit the province, 393 of the 539 families in RW 5 have been financially impacted, according to Mohamad Qunut, a Jogo Tonggo facilitator in RW 5.To help these families, neighbors built a hydroponic garden and started a collective lumbung pangan (food barn) at the RW 5 office.“We had no idea a resident had been planting hydroponic crops for a while, not until another resident came to me saying that he could probably assist and encourage others to do the same,” Qunut told The Jakarta Post on Saturday.last_img read more

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Wolf Administration Cabinet Members Host Community Event in Tunkhannock

first_imgWolf Administration Cabinet Members Host Community Event in Tunkhannock Press Release Tunkhannock, PA – Today, Wolf Administration cabinet officials were joined by more than 100 community members for a Cabinet in Your Community event at the Dietrich Theater in Tunkhannock. This series of events gives community members the opportunity to talk with cabinet secretaries and discuss issues important to the region.“It is of utmost importance to ensure that constituents across the commonwealth have access to their government officials,” said Governor Tom Wolf. “By hosting these events, my administration can better serve Pennsylvanians by having valuable dialogue and giving community members an opportunity to feel connected to Harrisburg regardless of where they live.”This event featured Department of Aging Secretary Teresa Osborne, Department of Community and Economic Development Secretary Dennis Davin, Department of Human Services Secretary Teresa Miller, Acting State Police Commissioner Lt. Col. Evanchick, and Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency Director Rick Flinn. The department heads answered questions from the audience and provided information on ongoing and upcoming state projects in the region.The next Cabinet in Your Community event is currently scheduled for next Thursday, April 26, in the McFarland Student Union Building at Kutztown University. This event will be hosted by the cabinet secretaries of the departments of Community and Economic Development, Aging, Health, and Transportation. April 16, 2018center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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