Club Passim plays to its Harvard audience

first_imgMarblehead native Hayley Reardon was just 11 years old when she picked up the guitar. A year later, she had written her own songs and wanted to perform onstage. Wary of having her play in a bar, her uncle suggested that she check out Club Passim, just steps away from Harvard’s campus.“As soon as I walked in, I realized that there was a whole, rich community that I hoped to become be part of, and a place where I could someday perform,” said Reardon, who has since opened for Don White and who released her first album, Where the Artists Go, in 2012. “They welcomed me and took me in.”Passim, she said, “is where I found my voice, and it was a lot bigger than I expected it to be as a 13-year-old kid. The people there really listened; they heard that voice.”Over the years, Passim and its Harvard audiences have heard many voices, some of them the biggest stars of folk and blues. Bonnie Raitt chose to attend Radcliffe College partly because of its proximity to Club 47, as Passim was known in the 1960s; Tom Rush began performing in 1961 while studying English at Harvard; and Joan Baez famously played the club when she was just 17 — and there introduced a young Bob Dylan, who performed between acts.Dan Hogan, director of Club Passim, called Reardon, who is now 16, “a young Joan Baez,” and said her experience reflects the club’s focus not just on exceptional musical experiences, but also on nurturing artists and building community.“Passim is really a listening room,” Hogan said. “It’s not like a bar, where music is in the background. Our patrons are well informed about music, and the performers know that. Cambridge, particularly right now, is a great music community, and our music now is much broader than folk music or singer-songwriter. It’s whatever music sounds good in a small listening room: bands, jazz, bluegrass, and solo musicians of all kinds.”Jack Megan, director of the Office for the Arts at Harvard and a former board member of Club Passim, has been listening since his undergraduate days at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester.“My initial affiliation was as a fan,” Megan said. “There’s a real intimacy between the club’s space and the stage, between the audience and the performer. It allows for being both in and around the music, which creates a powerful intimacy — a real feeling of belonging and oneness, for both the performer and the audience.”Kate Cameron was one of the Berklee students who provided music for the Thursday Passim-Berklee outdoor summer concert series on Palmer Street.While the club’s 55-year history is legendary, its new School of Music and close proximity to Harvard have created a strong bond among local musicians, faculty, staff, and students.Forrest O’Connor ’10, who plays the mandolin and served on Passim’s board while a Harvard undergraduate, approached the club about webcasting its shows. O’Connor is the co-founder of Concert Window, a company that webcasts concerts to viewers around the world. Passim was the first venue partner to sign up.“Passim has a legacy of finding and presenting really high-quality music every day,” O’Connor said. “They’re very open-minded and forward-thinking. The club has great connections with Harvard and Berklee College of Music, so it’s a cross-city relationship that’s a great resource for a lot of artists in the area.”Matt Glaser, a violinist and the artistic director of the American Roots Music Program at Berklee, has played at Passim since the late ’70s. Building a connection between Berklee and Passim, he said, was a natural fit. On the fourth Tuesday of every month, Berklee students travel to Harvard Square to perform at the club. In addition, Berklee students and alumni provided music each Thursday this summer for the Passim-Berklee outdoor summer concert series on Palmer Street.“They’re a wonderful group of people to work with, and they really know what they’re doing,” O’Connor said of Passim. “It’s definitely something that Harvard students should experience while they’re here. There’s just nothing else like it.”Harvard students should experience while they’re here. There’s just nothing else like it.”–>last_img read more

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Chinese report results for whole-virus H5N1 vaccine

first_imgSept 7, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – In a human trial in China, a whole-virus H5N1 avian influenza vaccine generated an immune response with a relatively low dose of antigen, suggesting that it could be used to immunize more people than may be possible with some other vaccines under development.The study, published online today in The Lancet, showed an adequate immune response in 78% of volunteers after two 10-microgram (mcg) doses of the vaccine plus an aluminum hydroxide (alum) adjuvant. That exceeds the European Union’s requirement of an acceptable response (a hemagglutinin-inhibition titer of 40 or more) in 70% of volunteers.The vaccine is made by Sinovac Biotech in Beijing, China, from an inactivated strain of H5N1 known as Vietnam/1194/2004. The report says that Sinovac was involved in designing and monitoring the study but played no role in collecting the data or writing the report.The randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study involved 120 adults (aged 18 to 60). They were divided into five groups of 24, with each group receiving either a placebo or 1.25, 2.5, 5, or 10 mcg of the vaccine.Each volunteer received the vaccine on the first day of the study and 28 days later. Serum samples were assessed for evidence of an immune response on days 0, 14, 28, 42, and 56.An antibody response was seen after the first injection at all dose levels. The highest response (78% seropositivity) was seen in the 10-mcg group after two doses.The investigators reported that all four doses were well tolerated, even though whole-virion vaccines are generally thought to cause more reactions than split-virion vaccines. No serious reactions were reported, and most local and systemic reactions were mild and brief. Three people dropped out of the study, and one person was excluded from the final analysis.The authors concluded that the dose required to reach an acceptable immune response was much lower than for vaccines reported in previous studies. Two reports published earlier this year described trials of a split-virus H5N1 vaccine developed by Sanofi Pasteur. The reports said two 90-mcg doses of nonadjuvanted vaccine or two 30-mcg doses of adjuvanted vaccine were required to produce the desired immune response.(In July, GlaxoSmithKline reported a good immune response in 80% of volunteers who received a dose of only 3.8 mcg of the company’s adjuvanted H5N1 vaccine. However, a full report of those findings has not yet been published.)”The manufacturing capacity for an H5N1 vaccine would increase if a whole-virion vaccine is used, because 20% to 30% of vaccine antigen is expected to be lost during the disruption process in the preparation of split-virion vaccines, according to our experience with seasonal influenza vaccine,” the Chinese researchers write.In an accompanying commentary, Iain Stephenson, MD, of the Infectious Diseases Unit at Leicester Royal Infirmary in Leicester, England, writes that the findings point up of “a potential dose-sparing approach that could be crucial for a global supply of pandemic vaccine.”He says that trial results for split-virion H5N1 vaccines have been disappointing, because within current manufacturing constraints, the two such vaccines under development would yield only enough to vaccinate 75 million to 225 million people.Though whole-virion vaccines generally produce a better immune response than split or subunit vaccines, development of whole-virion H5N1 vaccines has been delayed, Stephenson writes. He says it is difficult for manufacturers that produce split seasonal vaccines to switch production approaches and processing methods.Stephenson cautions that whole-virion vaccines have been associated with febrile reactions in children and emphasizes that careful investigation is needed before such vaccines can be widely used.It remains to be seen whether whole-virion vaccines can induce the broad cross-reactive response that would be needed to treat a variety of H5N1 viruses, Stephenson writes.Lin J, Zhang J, Dong X, et al. Safety and immunogenicity of an inactivated adjuvanted whole-virion influenza A (H5N1) vaccine: a phase 1 randomised controlled trial. Lancet 2006 (early online publication, Sep 7) [Abstract (registration required)]Stephenson I. H5N1 vaccines: how prepared are we for a pandemic? (Commentary). Lancet 2006 (early online publication, Sep 7)See also:May 12 CIDRAP News story “Sanofi reports results for H5N1 vaccine with adjuvant”Jul 26 CIDRAP News story “Glaxo says its H5N1 vaccine works at low dose”last_img read more

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UCL Round of 16: Werner penalty gives RB Leipzig 1st leg advantage

first_imgTottenham face an arduous task to keep their Champions League hopes alive after defeat at home by the highly impressive RB Leipzig in the first leg of their last-16 tie.Spurs, now stripped of long-term injury victim Son Heung-min with a broken arm as well as Harry Kane, were beaten more convincingly than the scoreline suggests as the side lying second in the Bundesliga demonstrated their growing stature.And it was only a masterclass from goalkeeper Hugo Lloris that gives Spurs hope for the second leg in Germany, keeping Leipzig at bay with a string of outstanding saves before he was beaten by Timo Werner’s 58th-minute penalty.Lloris turned Angelino’s shot on to the post and saved from Werner inside the first minute, later denying the striker once more from point-blank range.He was powerless to stop Werner’s drilled spot-kick after Ben Davies fouled Konrad Laimer but kept Spurs in it with a crucial block from Patrik Schick.Spurs finally forged chances of their own after the break, with Leipzig keeper Peter Gulacsi turning Giovani Lo Celso’s free-kick on to the post and Lucas Moura heading over from close range – but it is advantage to Julian Nagelsmann’s team.Spurs suffer from lack of threatThe big question for Spurs and manager Jose Mourinho was how they would lay a glove on RB Leipzig after the blow of losing Son to a broken arm exacerbated the long-term absence of main marksman Kane.And so it proved as, despite a much-improved second half, they could not apply consistent pressure to Leipzig, who will go into the second leg as firm favourites to reach the quarter-finals.Spurs should not be written off after the heroics of last season but without Kane and Son it would be an outstanding feat if they were to overturn this deficit.Mourinho at least had shining lights in goalkeeper Lloris and midfield man Lo Celso, the France keeper preventing Leipzig from reducing the second leg to little more than a formality.It was an ominous sign that he was in frantic action inside the first minute and he can take credit for Leipzig not being out of sight already.Lo Celso, meanwhile, showed his growing maturity as he drove Spurs forward, almost equalising with a fine 25-yard free-kick that was turned on to the post by the stretching Gulacsi.It was, however, a night of frustration for Spurs – summed up by the sight of a stony-faced Dele Alli hurling a water bottle and a boot in the dugout after he was substituted.Spurs must call on the Champions League spirit of last season to turn this last-16 tie around. Source: BBClast_img read more

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Zachary Winston, brother of Michigan State’s Cassius Winston, struck and killed by train

first_imgSophomore guard Zachary Winston of Albion College in Michigan — the brother of Michigan State All-American Cassius Winston — was struck by a train and killed on Saturday night.The Detroit Free Press reported that an Amtrak passenger train with 65 passengers aboard struck a pedestrian running on the tracks through Albion at 8:41 p.m. An Amtrak spokesperson told the Free Press the family of the victim had been notified. Police said ge purposefully stepped in front of the train, per the Free Press. Albion president Dr. Mauri Ditzler acknowledged the loss of Zachary Winston, although chose not to identify him so soon after the accident. Along with a promise to offer grief counseling to the college community and more details later Sunday, he issued a statement.“Last night, our family lost a student. And as families do in difficult times, we must come together to mourn and to embrace one another,” he said. “We have been in close contact with the student’s family and are doing everything we can to support them.“In accordance with the family’s wishes, we are not sharing a name or details at this time. Please keep the family close in your heart.” Zachary Winston, 19, was a product of Detroit Jesuit High (Detroit). He played 15 minutes off the bench and scored three points in Albion‘s season-opening loss to Mount Union on Friday.His brother, Cassius, is a senior for the top-ranked Spartans, a member of the 2019 Sporting News All-America team and the 2019 Big Ten Conference Player of the Year. He led Michigan State to the Final Four last April, its eighth appearance under coach Tom Izzo.MSU is scheduled to play Sunday night against Binghamton in East Lansing.last_img read more

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