BottleRock Presents Announces Lineup For Lavish New Sonoma Harvest Music Festival

first_imgSonoma Harvest Music Festival has announced the artist lineup for their 2018 event, set to take place on Saturday, September 22nd, and Sunday, September 23rd at the B.R. Cohn Winery. The Saturday lineup will be led by The Avett Brothers, in addition to performances from Lake Street Dive, Shovels & Rope, The Suffers, and Royal Jelly Jive. The Sunday lineup features sets by The Head & The Heart, Rodrigo y Gabriela, ZZ Ward, Rayland Baxter, and Con Brio.As Dave Graham, a partner in BottleRock Presents, said in a statement about the festival, “We are very happy to announce the return of music to B.R. Cohn Winery with the Sonoma Harvest Music Festival. … This intimate festival has a storied history in Sonoma wine country. No other music festival allows attendees to enjoy this level of musical talent in such an intimate venue, paired with Sonoma’s laid-back hospitality, great wine, and food. We essentially created this music festival for people who don’t like larger sized music festivals.”According to the festival website, the intimate event will be capped at 3,000 tickets, ensuring a “close-up, premium experience” for all festival attendees. Dedicated to hospitality, the Sonoma Harvest Music Festival pairs great music with the best of what Sonoma Valley has to offer, including artisanal foods from the area’s many acclaimed chefs plus as well as B.R. Cohn’s selection of premium wines and Northern California craft beer.B.R. Cohn Winery is a 70-acre multifaceted estate nestled between the Mayacamas range and Sonoma Mountain in the heart of Sonoma Valley. With a winemaking history dating to the 1860s, the vineyard is planted primarily to cabernet sauvignon and benefits from a unique confluence of geological and climatic factors that keep its soils warm, its vines frost-free, and its grapes ripe and flavor-packed. These advantages explain why B.R. Cohn is among Sonoma Valley’s few producers of world-class, single-vineyard cabernet sauvignon. Olive Hill Estate is named after B.R. Cohn’s grove of over 450 Picholine Olive Trees dating back to the mid-1800’s.Passes for the upscale event go on sale this Wednesday, March 28th at 10 a.m. PT. You can grab your tickets here when they become available. For more information about the Sonoma Harvest Music Festival website.[H/T Jambase]last_img read more

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Blueberry Pest Field Day

first_imgWith spring approaching, blueberry farmers focus on maximizing their 2018 yields, which means finding new ways to deal with pests like gall midge and spotted wing drosophila.To help these growers stay on top of potential pest problems, University of Georgia integrated pest management (IPM) researchers hosted a spring field day in Alma, Georgia, on Feb 21. Over 70 regional farmers from several southwestern Georgia counties, such as Bacon, Clinch, Appling and Pierce, attended the half-day event.Attendees ranged from experienced growers to new farmers.“We’ve only been in business for five years, and I feel like I have to take advantage of any opportunity to learn,” said Elizabeth McQuaig McIntyre, a farm manager in Abbeville, Georgia.The field day included presentations about pest risks and management strategies by UGA IPM coordinator Ash Sial and his blueberry research team. Following the presentations, attendees rotated through three stations: a sponsored lecture by AirScout, a pest identification station and a sprayer calibration demonstration.UGA entomology professor Glen Rains demonstrated sprayer calibration on various types of equipment.“Properly calibrated, maintained and adjusted sprayers are important to efficient pest management,” said Rains. “Calibration can be overwhelming if you are a novice or even a seasoned veteran. These field days equip farmers with the knowledge to better care for their crops.”The pest identification station included a microscopic viewing of pest specimens and damage, and management strategies by Sial and his team. Andy Wilkes, a novice blueberry farmer, found this station particularly beneficial.“All the information is extremely helpful, but there is something to be said about walking in the fields, learning what and how to identify, and seeing everything that is against us,” said Wilkes. “Every field day event we attend, we learn something new.”All attendees received Pesticide Applicator license credits.For more information on IPM, including upcoming field days, please visit the UGA Extension IPM website at www.ipm.uga.edu. For more information about the UGA Extension Blueberry Team, visit https://site.caes.uga.edu/blueberry/.last_img read more

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Cotton Boll and Consumer Judging

first_imgThirty youth participated in the 2020 Georgia 4-H State Cotton Boll and Consumer Judging Competition sponsored by the Georgia Cotton Commission on Dec. 12. In previous years, this contest was held in person at the Rock Eagle 4-H Center in Eatonton, Georgia. This year, the contest was held in a virtual format.The Cotton Boll and Consumer Judging Competition is part of the Georgia 4-H Healthy Living Program. This competitive judging contest teaches 4-H’ers to make wise consumer decisions and educates participants on cotton as an agricultural commodity in Georgia. The competition offers youth the chance to build critical thinking, public speaking and life skills in consumer economics.“Consumer Judging teaches youth how to think critically and make smart consumer decisions,” said Courtney Brown, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension 4-H specialist. “The skills learned in preparation for this competitive event are real-life skills that youth will continue to use throughout their lives when making purchases.” The state contest consists of two competition areas: judging classes and advertisements. In the judging class portion of the competition, 4-H’ers are required to judge four classes of consumer items or services and rank items based on provided details, factors and scenarios, as well as provide oral reasoning for their selections. The advertisements portion requires 4-H’ers to promote cotton and its use through a presentation.Prior to the state competition, 4-H’ers from ninth through 12th grades competed in virtual district-level contests. The first and second place senior teams at each district area contest continued on to compete at the State Cotton Boll and Consumer Judging Competition. Although the contest was held online, all contest elements were maintained. Cotton presentations were prerecorded and judged virtually. Participants examined the classes and scenarios using a timed platform, Qualtrics, and presented their reasoning to the judges live via Zoom.The first place Senior Team winners and High Overall Individual will receive Georgia Master 4-H’er status, be honored at Georgia State 4-H Congress in July in Atlanta, and represent Georgia in the Consumer Decision Making contest at Western National Roundup in January 2021 in Denver, Colorado. The second place team will also travel to Denver to represent Georgia 4-H in the Western National Roundup Family and Consumer Science Skill-A-Thon or Family and Consumer Sciences Knowledge Bowl.The winners of the 2020 Georgia 4-H Cotton Boll and Consumer Judging Competition are:TeamsFirst place: Ashley Braddy, Liam Jay, Timothy Lord and Lauren Wixson – Ben Hill CountySecond place: Liz Pridgon, Sydney Pridgon, Dana Wells and Amare Woods – Tift CountyThird place: Sierra Arnold, Lydia Belflower, Veronica Lee and Lucy Weigert – Bleckley CountyIndividualsHigh Overall Individual: Liam Jay – Ben Hill CountyHigh Presentation: Liam Jay – Ben Hill CountyHigh Placing and Reasons: Ashley Braddy – Ben Hill CountyGeorgia 4-H empowers youth to become true leaders by developing necessary life skills, positive relationships and community awareness. As the largest youth leadership organization in the state, 4-H reaches more than 190,000 people annually through UGA Extension offices and 4-H facilities. For more information, visit georgia4h.org or contact your local Extension office.last_img read more

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Path to a perfect policy

first_imgby: Suzie HigbeeOne of the first places a regulator will start during any given examination is by looking at a financial institution’s policies, which is one good reason you should keep yours in tip-top shape. How exactly do you build that perfect policy? Sometimes the best way to figure out how to make the perfect policy is by hearing what elements contribute to a bad one. The following four mistakes are the most commonly made, yet the most important to avoid:No policy at allWhile rare, we do occasionally see institutions that are missing one or more key policies. Not only does this burden the auditor or examiner—who must now interview personnel to obtain information about processes and procedures—but it creates operational risks for the institution as well. In the absence of written guidance, personnel are far more likely to make mistakes (and possibly costly ones at that). How will your staff know how to handle uncommon or unusual situations without guidance from a policy?An overly generic policySometimes institutions borrow their policies from the Internet or from another financial institution, or use a generic policy provided by a vendor. While this may not be a bad place to start, a truly effective policy needs to be customized. For example, a BSA policy should contain member identification policies specific to the institution. This leads to the third issue, which is…. continue reading » 1SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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