SiriusXM Announces New “Ask Trey” Segment, Encourages Fans To Submit Questions

first_imgEarlier this summer, SiriusXM radio launched a limited-run Phish Radio station including a special program dubbed “Ask Trey”, the channel’s centerpiece segment in which guitarist Trey Anastasio responded to questions from fans in a conversation with program host Ari Fink.Today, SiriusXM‘s Jam_ON channel has announced another round of “Ask Trey”, and is once again encouraging fans to submit their burning questions for Big Red. Fans have the chance to ask the Phish guitarist absolutely anything by submitting questions via email to [email protected] between now and Tuesday, November 13th. The answers will be broadcast live at a later date.In August, SiriusXM shared a video clip from their “Ask Trey” session about the origins of quintessential Phish composition “You Enjoy Myself”, often referred to by its initials, YEM.As Trey explained, “We went to Europe to play street music, we were nineteen… The whole summer we were buskers, me and [Jon Fishman] when he still had that crazy long hair.” When asked what the setlist for their street performances was like, Trey responded: “It was parts, bits and pieces of what became ‘You Enjoy Myself’ and ‘Harry Hood’.” The story unfolded as Trey recalled crafting the various musical segments which eventually became the composed sections of YEM.He also shed some light on the inspiration for the song’s light-hearted title. “There was this guy we were hanging with, we just met him on the street and would just hang out for hours. He was Italian and barely spoke English at all, but we were laughing. One day we were walking around right near the Uffizi Museum, and he had one arm around me and one around Fishman, and he says, [in a thick Italian accent], “You know, when I am with you, you enjoy myself!” Watch Trey discuss the origins of “You Enjoy Myself” below:Trey Anastasio on the Origins of “You Enjoy Myself”[Video: SiriusXM]last_img read more

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Eric Petersen Will Lead Broadway’s School of Rock

first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 20, 2019 A new class has enrolled for the second year of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s latest Main Stem hit School of Rock—The Musical. From November 7, comedic actor Eric Petersen will assume the role of wannabe rock star, Dewey Finn, taking over for Tony nominee Alex Brightman, who is scheduled to play his final performance on November 6.Petersen has been seen on Broadway, off-Broadway, and in national tours, most notably as Shrek in Shrek: The Musical, Peter and the Starcatcher and The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee. On TV, Petersen played Arlo Barth on TVLand’s Kristie and has been seen on Disney Channel’s Jessie, Pair of Kings and Kirby Buckets.The Kid Band, who perform Lloyd Webber’s score live at every performance, will include new cast members Rachel Katzke as Katie the bass player and Walden Sullivan as Lawrence the keyboardist, along with returning cast members, Brandon Niederauer as Zack the guitarist and Raghav Mehrotra as Freddy on drums. Additionally, Olivia Chun will assume the role of super serious band manager Summer, Steven Booth will take on the role of Ned, Annabelle Wachtel will play Marcy, Terrance Bell, Jr. will play Mason, Chloe Bryan will play Madison, and Ellie Kim will join the cast as a swing.The new class of School of Rock also features Will Blum as the Dewey alternate, Jenn Gambatese as Rosalie Mullins, Becky Gulsvig as Patty, Bobbi MacKenzie as Tomika, and Luca Padovan as Billy. The adult ensemble includes Emily Cramer, Natalie Charle Ellis, John Arthur Greene, Michael Hartney, Merritt David Janes, Nehal Joshi, Lulu Lloyd, Jaygee Macapugay, Cassie Okenka, Patrick O’Neill, Morgan Rose, Jesse Swimm, Josh Tower, and J. Michael Zygo. The kid’s ensemble features Paul Luke Bonenfant, Ava Della Pietra, Gabby Gutierrez, Gianna Harris, Jason Kisare and Jersey Sullivan.Currently in performances at the Winter Garden Theatre, School of Rock is based on the 2003 film of the same name, featuring music from the movie, as well as an original score by Lloyd Webber, lyrics by Glenn Slater, a book by Julian Fellowes and direction by Laurence Connor. The show follows Dewey Finn, a failed, wannabe rock star who decides to earn a few extra bucks by posing as a substitute teacher at a prestigious prep school. There he turns a class of straight-A students into a guitar-shredding, bass-slapping, mind-blowing rock band. While teaching these pint-sized prodigies what it means to truly rock, Dewey falls for the school’s beautiful, but uptight headmistress, helping her rediscover the wild child within. New Class of ‘School of Rock(Photo: Jenny Anderson) View Commentscenter_img Related Shows School of Rock – The Musicallast_img read more

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4 ways to dodge cybercrime when banking, shopping on mobile phones

first_img 14SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr The nature of identity fraud is changing. With the rollout of smart chips in credit and debit cards making it more difficult to steal using cards themselves, thieves have their eyes on your data instead.If you don’t protect yourself, you could join the 13.1 million Americans Javelin Strategy & Research  reported got hit by identity thieves in 2015.While mobile banking and payments are certainly making it easier and more convenient to handle one’s finances and conduct business, the same ease and convenience make them a ripe target for criminals, says Madeline Aufseeser, CEO of fraud-prevention company Tender Armor.“Because merchants are trying to make it easier for consumers to shop online and on their phones, all your credentials are stored online, including payment information, and you don’t even need a basket — just click a button and boom, you get charged. Because they have gone down this path of making things easier to purchase online, it makes it easier for the fraudsters to get to the data,” said Aufseeser. continue reading »last_img read more

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Cairns rental rate tight, political changes to impact sector

first_imgVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 1:53Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -1:53 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD540p540p360p360p216p216pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenAustralia’s regional real estate hot spots01:54THE state’s peak real estate body is concerned changes to renting laws which could erode landlords’ rights would put pressure on rental availability, especially in markets such as Cairns which has maintained a rental vacancy rate below 2 per cent for years.Real Estate Institute of Queensland chief executive Antonia Mercorella said while the Queensland property market was poised for a solid performance in 2019, investors faced uncertainty.The State Government is set to finalise its ongoing review of the Residential Tenancies and Rooming Accommodation Act in the first half of this year, with a range of potential measures that are concerning to landlords.“The public rhetoric around this review seems to focus on eroding landlord rights and creating severe imbalance with disproportionate levels of power weighted in favour of tenants,” Ms Mercorella said.“The legislation must serve both parties equally, rather than give all the rights to one party and disadvantage the other. Distorted laws serve no one and will only create dysfunction in the rental sector,” Ms Mercorella said.“This concerns us because more than 34 per cent of Queenslanders rent and that number is rising, and if we lose investors we may face a rental accommodation shortage.”More from newsCairns home ticks popular internet search terms2 days agoTen auction results from ‘active’ weekend in Cairns2 days agoEqually concerning to investors are the flagged changes to the negative gearing provisions from federal Labor.“The negative gearing policy was first announced in 2015 when Sydney and Melbourne house prices were growing at double-digit rates. It was seen as a way to limit investor activity in the market and make way for owner occupiers, creating less competition for stock and, as a result, soften price growth.“However, prices in Sydney and Melbourne are now falling. This raises the question — does the nation really need a policy that is designed to push house prices down? What purpose do these changes serve now?” Ms Mercorella said.last_img read more

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Low birthweight ‘linked to autism’, says US study

first_img Share HealthInternationalLifestylePrint Low birthweight ‘linked to autism’, says US study by: – October 17, 2011 Babies born underweight are known to be prone to a variety of cognitive problems.Babies born weighing less than 4lb (1.8kg) could be more prone to developing autism than children born at normal weight, a study suggests.Writing in Pediatrics journal, US researchers followed 862 New Jersey children born at a low birthweight from birth to the age of 21.Some 5% were diagnosed with autism, compared to 1% of the general population.But experts say more research is needed to confirm and understand the link.Links between low birthweight and a range of motor and cognitive problems have been well established by previous research.But the researchers say this is the first study to establish that these children may also have a greater risk of developing autism spectrum disorders.The babies in the study were born between September 1984 and July 1987 in three counties in New Jersey.They all weighed between 0.5kg and 2kg or a maximum of about 4.4lb.At the age of 16, 623 children were screened for risk of an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Of the 117 who were found to be positive in that screening, 70 were assessed again at age 21.Eleven of that group were found to have an autism spectrum disorder.From these results, the researchers calculated an estimated prevalence rate of ASD of 31 out of 623 children, which is equal to 5%.Jennifer Pinto-Martin, professor at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing and director of the autism centre where this research was conducted, said: “Cognitive problems in these children may mask underlying autism.“If there is suspicion of autism or a positive screening test for ASD, parents should seek an evaluation for an ASD. Early intervention improves long-term outcome and can help these children both at school and at home.”Dig deeperBut Dorothy Bishop, professor of developmental neuropsychology at the University of Oxford, said it was important to put the findings in perspective.“The association looks real, but nevertheless, most low birthweight children don’t have autism, and most children with autism don’t have low birthweight.”Georgina Gomez, action research leader for The National Autistic Society, said more research is needed to confirm the link between low birthweight and autism and better understand why babies born underweight may be more prone to developing autism. “Low birthweight has been linked to a range of motor and cognitive problems and often goes hand-in-hand with premature birth and birthing complications.“It is important to dig down further to try to understand the biological processes and events that could explain this proposed connection.”BBC News Share Tweetcenter_img Sharing is caring! Share 20 Views   no discussionslast_img read more

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