Glenhope House / JOH Architects

first_img Australia ArchDaily ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/194393/glenhope-house-joh-architects Clipboard 2009 Save this picture!© Dianna Snape + 16 Share Projects Glenhope House / JOH Architects Year:  ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/194393/glenhope-house-joh-architects Clipboard “COPY” Architects: JOH Architects Area Area of this architecture project Glenhope House / JOH ArchitectsSave this projectSaveGlenhope House / JOH Architects CopyHouses•Melbourne, Australia Photographs:  Dianna Snape Text description provided by the architects. The house is a family weekender located on approximately 100 acres in the granite belt roughly one hours drive north of Melbourne. Our brief “in simple” is summarized in the points below:Save this picture!© Dianna Snape Recommended ProductsDoorsC.R. LaurenceCRL-U.S. Aluminum Entice Series Entrance SystemWindowsVitrocsaMinimalist Window – SlidingDoorsSaliceSliding Door System – Slider S20DoorsdormakabaEntrance Doors – Revolving Door 4000 Series1. A contemporary dwelling to comfortably house the entire family, but with the opportunity to “zone” when there are only two residing 2. Strong focus to all four elevations – not just a façade 3. Low maintenance natural materials 4. To capture the views in all directions 5. Extensive outdoor areas with shelter from both east or west 6. Respect for the local climate (extreme heat & cold)Save this picture!© Dianna Snape The obvious site for the house has panoramic views of the surrounding hills with the existing site access road approaching from the south. We created a circular driveway at the head of this road leading to covered car spaces, which radiate off the driveway, and provide sheltered access directly through the boots room or laundry on either side of the main entry door. The dwelling has three wings built around this central circular drive, bedroom / study wings along the east & west sides, with the main living, kitchen, dining and decks along the north. A gallery connects the three wings and main entry. The bedroom wings are mirrored geometric compressed cement sheet boxes with deep reveal windows providing shade and weather shelter.Save this picture!© Dianna Snape The main living, kitchen, dining and decks facing due north are under one long blade corrugated roof structure supported by high rustic timber trusses which are supported of a rammed earth blade wall. The rammed earth wall also separates these areas from the gallery walkway, which links all three wings and the building entries.Save this picture!© Dianna Snape Materials are: Natural timber cladding, decking, trusses and windows have been used along the northern wing with zincalume finish corrugated roofing. The blade rammed earth wall has the same natural finish both inside and outside the building.Save this picture!© Dianna Snape The only painted external surface is the compressed cement sheet cladding to the bedroom / study wings. The paint colour was selected to best match the distance eucalypt hillsides (earthy olive / brown), which blends with all the selected natural building materials as well as the surrounding landscape in both summer (dry barren brown) and winter (Lush green hillsides)Save this picture!© Dianna Snape Project gallerySee allShow lessOpen Call for Ideas: ‘How Much Does Your Building Weigh?’ArticlesAugmented Structures v1.1: Acoustic Formations / Salon2Articles Share “COPY” Photographs Houses Area:  355 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project CopyAbout this officeJOH ArchitectsOfficeFollowProductsWoodGlass#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesMelbourneWoodHousesAustraliaPublished on January 02, 2012Cite: “Glenhope House / JOH Architects” 02 Jan 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogSinkshansgroheBathroom Mixers – Metropol ClassicVinyl Walls3MVinyl Finish – DI-NOC™ StonePartitionsSkyfoldVertically Folding Operable Walls – Zenith® SeriesPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesProdemaProdEx Wood Facade in the Aspen Art MuseumSealantsSikaRenovation of Zeitz MuseumSinksBradley Corporation USAVerge Coordinated Soap Dispenser and Faucet SetsWoodLunawoodThermo Timber and Industrial ThermowoodAcousticFabriTRAK®FabriFELT™ for Walls and CeilingsGlassDip-TechDigital Ceramic Etch PrintingWindowspanoramah!®ah! Ultra MinimalistEngineered Wood FlooringAustralian Sustainable Hardwoods (ASH)Australian Oak Engineered FlooringLouvers / ShuttersConstruction SpecialtiesSunshades – Airfoil LuxMore products »Read commentsSave想阅读文章的中文版本吗?Glenhope House / JOH Architects是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

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Tiny Alaskan village tries to manage influx of commercial fishermen amid COVID-19

first_imgKatherine Carscallen’s livelihood depends on seasonal sockeye salmon fishing in Bristol Bay, Alaska, but she fears COVID-19 may cause history to repeat itself. – (Courtesy Katherine Carscallen)By KAYNA WHITWORTH, CONNOR BURTON and JENNA HARRISON, ABC News(BRISTOL BAY, Alaska) — “It’s just how the earth is supposed to be,” says third-generation commercial fishing boat captain Katherine Carscallen. She’s talking about her homeland, Bristol Bay, Alaska. Every June and July, more than half of the world’s supply of sockeye salmon are pulled from these waters.It sounds excessive, but it’s not; in a highly regulated practice, thousands of fish are left to return home and spawn, allowing the industry to support the region for generations.The yearly salmon fishery brings in an estimated $200 million in direct revenue to the community of Bristol Bay, says Norm Van Vactor, president and CEO of Bristol Bay Economic Development Corporation.“Overall, it’s a multi-billion dollar fishery,” he says of the thousands of fisherman who come from all over the world to fish for salmon. On average, 10,000 fishermen come each year — but oftentimes that number is upwards of 15,000. In addition, 6,000 fish processing workers also descend on the tiny community.Fishing has dangers of its own, but this year the peril is invisible. The isolated community of Bristol Bay has only recorded three cases of COVID-19 as of June 20, and now many of those arriving could be carrying the deadly virus. As a result, some local fishermen wanted this year’s fishery to be canceled.“There’s no doubt that this is putting the region at risk. And if it was our choice, it likely wouldn’t be happening,” says Carscallen.The commercial fishery hasn’t even begun and it’s already seeing an outbreak at a fish processing plant. On June 22, 12 of the 52 workers screened tested positive. They were immediately isolated.Bristol Bay is home to only 6,500 people, and most are Alaskan natives who feel their safety is at risk if the fishery were to commence.“The vast majority of our economy is the heart of the commercial fishery,” said Alannah Hurley, executive director of United Tribes of Bristol Bay. “It was a hard decision to make but it was a necessary one.”For the locals, it’s their land — but not their call.In an official COVID-19 Health Mandate sent out by his office in April, Gov. Mike Dunleavy laid out guidelines for independent commercial fishing vessels to follow while the industry begins its fishing season.“The State of Alaska acknowledges the importance of our commercial fishing fleet to our economy and lifestyle as Alaskans,” the statement said. “In order to ensure a safe, productive fishing season this year, while still protecting Alaskan communities to the maximum extent possible from the spread of the virus, the State is establishing standardized protective measures to be followed by all independent commercial fishing vessels operating in Alaskan waters and ports.”Dr. Catherine Hyndman, clinical director of Bristol Bay Area Health Corporation, says, “testing should be mandatory, and people should get tested on a number of occasions.”The first planeloads of fisherman began arriving June 1. Carscallen picked up her uncle who comes every year. Wearing a mask, he hopped into the bed of her pickup truck. She dropped him off at a converted shipping container, where he plans to disappear, ready his nets in solitude, and then hit the water with a small crew.A 14-day quarantine is mandated by the state but not enforced, and testing is available. Hurley tells ABC News that they are seeing people “completely disregard quarantine and safety measures.”“It’s all based on the honor system,” said Van Vactor. “There’s no follow-up, there are no real penalties in place if you don’t comply. There’s no way they’re even checking to see if you’re complying.”Vactor said he and others have been “banging their heads against the wall for months,” asking the state for mandated pre-quarantine testing, post-quarantine testing and help enforcing the rules.“To date, the state has virtually done none of that,” he said.For those who decide to get tested, Hyndman says she has seen a few cases where fishermen initially test negative “and then 10 or 12 days into their quarantine they test positive after a second test.”One of the largest fishing companies in the United States, Trident Seafoods, told ABC News in a statement that they have implemented their own stringent protocols throughout all operations. A representative tells ABC News they “require 14-day, monitored quarantines in hotels with security guards that we provide for all of our Alaska shore plant and large vessel workforce, with PCR testing before safe secure transfer to the destination work site.” They also offer daily health screenings.Once the fish are caught, they are sent directly to fish processing plants in Bristol Bay. Here workers prepare the fish, freeze them and then send them all over the world. A former processing plant manager himself, Vactor says in a typical year the common cold is a huge problem. “Now you interject this? It’s definitely very, very concerning,” he said.In a processing plant, thousands of workers stand shoulder-to-shoulder working 16- to 20-hour shifts, eating together in mess halls and then bunking together — in some cases, six to eight people to a room. Vactor wonders how a virus like COVID-19 can possibly be kept from spreading.“There were a lot of other things that used to keep me up at night, Vactor said, “but boy, this one is a pretty daunting task.”If the concern among locals is high, it may be because many of the village elders were raised by orphans of the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918. A food processing worker brought the flu into the community, and “It decimated the population,” says Hurley.Many of the people who are asking that this year’s fishery be canceled are direct descendants.Hurley also fears that the local community is extremely susceptible and that the virus would quickly spread out of control. The largest hospital in the region has just 12 beds, and anyone who gets sick is transported by Medevac to Anchorage for care. As a result, arriving fishermen are being encouraged to get Medevac insurance.Carscallen has been on a boat since the day after she was born, and began running her own crew at age 13. For her, the fishery is all she knows and she now fears her way of life could be threatened; it’s not a question of whether the coronavirus will hit her region, but how bad it will be.“I really just hope we’re not forgotten about once the spread happens,” she said.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Joe Biden’s popular vote lead is now larger than the populations of these 22 states

first_img– Advertisement – Connecticut, Utah, Iowa, Nevada, Arkansas, Mississippi, Kansas, New Mexico, Nebraska, Idaho, West Virginia, Hawaii, New Hampshire, Maine, Montana, Rhode Island, Delaware, South Dakota, North Dakota, Alaska, Vermont, and Wyoming. Connecticut’s population is around 3,563,080 and Wyoming’s is around 567,025. In fact, you could take the populations of South Dakota, North Dakota, Alaska, Vermont, and Wyoming, add them up and still not reach the difference in people who have preferred Joe Biden to Donald Trump.If (and when) Joe Biden becomes the 46th president of the United States of America, the Republican Party will predictably do what they have always done for the last 40-odd years or so, and pretend that new rules of compromise exist and, most importantly, that the Democratic Party and Joe Biden does not have a mandate. However, this lie, while repeated often by GOP operatives, is still a lie. The numbers and the facts are in. The majority of the country wants new leadership and it is the Republican Party that needs to find compromises it can live with or we will be forced to go it alone.  As of right now, the list includes in descending or from largest population to smallest:Campaign Action- Advertisement –last_img read more

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Labor of love: ‘The Capital of Basketball’ is wife’s lasting tribute to sportswriter John McNamara

first_imgMcNamara was close to finishing that project when he was murdered — one of five victims in the June 2018 mass shooting at the offices of the Capital Gazette newspaper in Annapolis, Md.“I guess for the two months after he died I couldn’t bring myself to go into his den,” Chamblee told Sporting News. “I kept the door closed. I shuddered when I walked past it. He should have been in there working on this book. He was every night when we were home and he wasn’t at a game.“But after about two months I opened the door and tried to remember what it was like when he was there. And the boxes of the files were so conspicuous to see in the middle of the floor — just boxes and boxes of microfiche that he had printed out and telephone numbers he had called. And there was a list of people that he wanted to call back pasted above his desk.“And I decided to take a look to see how far along he had gotten.”McNamara was a staff writer at the Annapolis paper at the time of his death, but his enthusiasm for sports was addressed most nights by wrapping himself in the history of D.C.-area high school basketball. The region long has been extraordinarily rich in basketball talent: Dave Bing, Austin Carr, Adrian Dantley, Victor Oladipo, Danny Ferry, Adrian Branch, Sidney Lowe, Sherman Douglas and Len Bias all were products of its high school teams. There is a listing of all-area teams near the back of “The Capital of Basketball,” starting in the 1920s and carrying forward to 2000, that is loaded with eventual All-Americans, NBA All-Stars and Naismith Hall of Famers.He expressed in the introduction to this book how, already an enormous fan of the NBA and colleges, he came to fall in love with the high school game by attending with his father a matchup of Archbishop Carroll and the private school he had entered, St. John’s. He was “hooked” for life.“In terms of value for your entertainment dollar,” McNamara wrote, “I still believe you can’t beat a good high school basketball game.”McNamara wrote a couple of books about the athletic program at Maryland, his alma mater, one each about football and basketball. Like many writers, he had in his mind a project or two he wanted to address when he found the time. He wanted to write about the history of D.C. high school hoops, but when he learned about the death of legendary coach Bob Dwyer, who had led Archbishop Carroll to 55 consecutive victories in the 1950s, McNamara told his wife he’d missed his chance. She knew better.Chamblee reminded McNamara that Hall-of-Famer Morgan Wootten of DeMatha Catholic and Joe Gallagher of St. John’s were among the elite coaches still around then, with lifetimes of stories to tell. She urged McNamara to contact them and collect their memories and, when the time came, to put it all on paper.“He had been working on it, and I had helped him back up those files, so I knew where they were,” Chamblee said. “He didn’t like me to read his works in progress, but I had put them on a thumb drive and on the cloud and then a few places, so that if we lost one we’d have other backups. I decided to search them out and download them and open them up.“He was so close to finishing. I thought I had to be able to do this for him and finish it.”With help from D.C. area sportswriter David Elfin, who had collaborated with McNamara on “Cole Classics! Maryland Basketball’s Leading Men and Moments,” Chamblee was able to complete the book in time for it to be published as the 2019-20 basketball season commenced.The idea of the book was to cover the 20th century, ending with Wootten’s induction into the Naismith Memorial Hall of Fame in 2000. He’d covered all but the final two years of the 1990s, and Chamblee said Elfin was an enormous help in addressing those seasons and proofreading the entire work. The opening chapter covering 1900-1950 was not yet done, but McNamara had so thoroughly outlined what he had planned, Chamblee said, “Really, all I had to do was turn his outline into complete sentences and write it the way he would want it to be written.”The completed work is a tribute to McNamara’s encyclopedic knowledge of the basketball scene in the D.C. metro area. It is published by Georgetown University Press. Academic houses often prefer the work they produce to have been peer-reviewed before publication. But no one could find a “peer” in this arena; McNamara was the authority.Chamblee is a former newspaper reporter who became an attorney and now works as senior regulatory counsel for the Food and Drug Administration. She was out of work, temporarily, during the government shutdown earlier this year, but that provided her time to finish her husband’s book project.“If the government hadn’t shut down for those six weeks, I don’t think we’d be talking about this book today,” she said. “I couldn’t take on another job — that’s not allowed — so I just worked 12-hour days finishing the book.”Some of what was required was identifying the subjects of photographs; McNamara didn’t always write them down because he’d have known them at a glance. Chamblee got some help from other writers and credited Wootten and Maryland basketball voice Johnny Holliday for being generous with their time in helping to assure accuracy. Hall of Fame coach Gary Williams, who coached at Maryland from 1989-2011, agreed to write the foreword, explaining he got to know McNamara on a professional level, “and then as a friend.” There is a special feeling for an author when the first copy of a book arrives, usually in the mail or by courier service. So many years of labor can go into such a project, and to hold it all in one’s hands is an extraordinary experience. Few, though, have felt anything like what Chamblee did when “The Capital of Basketball” was delivered to her.“I was so conflicted when I held that book in my hand,” Chamblee said. “Of course, these days you email off the files, so even just hitting the send button on the files felt like I was letting it go. Maybe it feels a little like a parent dropping their child off at college.“And when it came back, part of me wanted to keep it like this was my secret between John and I, and I didn’t want to share it. But certainly, I knew I needed to share it. John wanted people to know these stories, so I have to let it go.” For about two months, the last words John McNamara had to share with his readers — words that represented over a decade’s worth of research, conversation, investigation and, above all, passion — sat untouched in his office.In 2007, he began the project that would become “The Capital of Basketball” at the urging of his wife, Andrea Chamblee. She knew was no one was more qualified to write the history of the incredible high school basketball competition that has flourished for over a century in the Washington D.C. metro area.last_img read more

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