USC student shot near campus: ‘I miss my baby,’ says his mom, an Oakland councilwoman

first_imgLynette Gibson McElhaney(LOS ANGELES) — A 21-year-old student at the University of Southern California was shot dead near the Los Angeles campus this weekend, the university said, leaving his mother, an Oakland councilwoman, heartbroken.Victor McElhaney was a senior at USC’s Thornton School of Music “where he was pursuing his lifelong love of music with some of the greats,” his mother, Oakland Councilwoman Lynette Gibson McElhaney, wrote in a statement Sunday.Councilwoman McElhaney called her son’s death a “senseless act of violence.”The Los Angeles Police Department said a 21-year-old man was shot during a robbery shortly after midnight Sunday. The gunman and two or three other suspects fled the scene, which was east of campus, by Adams Boulevard and Maple Avenue, police said.The victim was taken to a hospital in critical condition. Police did not release the victim’s name or confirm that he died.“Victor was a son of Oakland,” his mother said. “He was a musician who drew his inspiration from the beat, soul, and sound of the Town and he belonged in every nook and cranny of Oakland.”“I miss my baby,” she said. “Please keep me, my family, and all of my son’s friends in your thoughts and prayers.”Victor McElhaney was a jazz studies student who “believed in the power of music to touch lives, to heal, and to bring hope,” Robert Cutietta, Dean of the USC Thornton School of Music, said in a statement Sunday. “We honor Victor’s life and send our thoughts and prayers to his family and friends in this time of grief and tragedy.”USC Thornton faculty member Peter Erskine, who taught the 21-year-old privately for a year, said in a statement, “I just saw Victor a week or two ago walking across campus. His smile, even on that sunny day, lit up the whole place.”“I had the pleasure of getting to speak with his mother Lynette at a student orientation meeting,” Erskine said. “I asked, ‘What does Victor want?’ She replied, ‘He wants to change the world.’ And that’s what he was doing with his music, trying to change the world. He made it a better place.”“Victor was already playing at a professional level when he came to USC,” Erskine said. “Speaking on behalf of the entire USC community, we are devastated by this loss, and we extend heartfelt and heartbroken condolences to all of his family, friends and colleagues.”University officials added, “We appreciate the diligent and ongoing efforts of the Los Angeles Police Department to quickly identify and arrest those responsible for this senseless crime and extend our greatest sympathies to Victor’s family and friends.”Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Evansville City Council January 27, 2020 Meeting Agenda

first_imgVI.COMMITTEE REPORTS B.2019 INVESTMENT REPORT; Russ Lloyd, Jr., City Controller City Council Meeting January 27, 2020 AgendaAGENDA C.ORDINANCE R-2019-33 An Ordinance to Rezone Certain Real Estate in the City of Evansville, State of Indiana, More Commonly Known as 601 W. Tennessee Street Petitioner: Phillip R. Hooper Owner: KR Properties LLC Requested Change: M2 to R2 Ward: 6 Brinkmeyer Representative: Phillip R. Hooper FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare C.UPDATE ON THE DIAGNOSIS MEMO (Unified Development Ordinance);    Cynthia Bowen, Rundell Ernstberger F-2020-01 Attachment: III.REPORTS AND COMMUNICATIONS IV.SPECIAL ORDERS OF THE DAY I.INTRODUCTION C-2020-03 Attachment: R-2020-33 Attachment: A.ORDINANCE F-2020-01 An Ordinance of the Common Council of the City of Evansville Authorizing Transfers of Appropriations, Additional Appropriations and Repeal and Re-Appropriation of Funds for Various City Funds Sponsor(s): Weaver Discussion Led By: Finance Chair Discussion Date: 2/10/2020 Notify: Russ Lloyd, Controller VII.REGULAR AGENDA:  SECOND READING OF ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS A.ORDINANCE G-2020-01 An Ordinance Amending Chapter 18.135 (Off-Street Parking and Loading) of the Evansville Municipal Code Sponsor(s): Weaver Discussion Led By: ASD Chair Discussion Date: 1/27/2020 IX.MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS B.Department Liaisons G-2020-01 Attachment: X.COMMITTEE REPORTS V.CONSENT AGENDA:  FIRST READING OF ORDINANCES AND RESOLUTIONS D.ADDITIONAL MISCELLANEOUS BUSINESS Memo Attachment: A.Committee Chair Appointments G-2020-02 Attachment: A.RESOLUTION C-2020-03 A Resolution of the Common Council of the City of Evansville, Indiana, Authorizing a Conflict of Interest for Zac Heronemus, Executive Director of Aurora, Inc., and 3rd Ward City Councilman Sponsor(s): Weaver Discussion Led By: Council President Discussion Date: 1/27/2020 Notify: Kelley Coures, DMD VIII.RESOLUTION DOCKET Agenda Attachment: XI.ADJOURNMENT II.APPROVAL OF MEETING MEMORANDUM B.ORDINANCE G-2020-02 An Ordinance Amending Section 18.130.020 (Minimum Floor Area) of the Evansville Municipal Code Sponsor(s): Weaver Discussion Led By: ASD Chair Discussion Date: 1/27/2020 A.THE NEXT MEETING of the Common Council will be Monday, February 10, 2020 at 5:30 p.m.last_img read more

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A boost for school principals

first_imgWhen a new online training program launched in July to help school principals become better leaders and managers, the instructors expected to get maybe 100 participants.Instead, they were swamped.Six hundred registered for the Certificate in School Management and Leadership, which attests to the need that school principals feel to become better equipped to lead schools. There are nearly 114,000 school principals across the nation, and surveys say that superintendents are often unhappy with the preparation that principals receive.The four-course program is a partnership between the Harvard Graduate School of Education  (HGSE) and the Harvard Business School (HBS). The program’s instructors are Mary Grassa O’Neill, former school principal and superintendent, senior lecturer on education, and faculty director of the School Leadership Program at HGSE, and Allen Grossman, senior fellow and retired professor of management practice at HBS.The Gazette sat down with O’Neill and Grossman to talk about the changing demands on school principals, and the preparation they could use to lead their schools. (The first course, called “Leading Change,” will be offered again in October.)Q&AMary Grassa O’Neill & Allen GrossmanGAZETTE: How has the role of school principals evolved over the years?O’NEILL: Once upon a time, a school principal ran his or her school the way she or he saw fit. There wasn’t a whole lot of accountability. We weren’t measuring everything. We were not using high-stakes testing. Now we’re comparing schools based on test scores. We’re issuing report cards for schools. We’re failing schools. We’re also in an era where parents think the school should take care of everything and prepare their children to get into competitive colleges. Once upon a time, we didn’t feed kids at school, but now we do. We provide counseling; we provide care before and after school. These are all relatively new requirements for schools. Add to that managing social media and technology, focusing on instructional leadership, teacher evaluation, and violence prevention.GROSSMAN: Everything that happens in schools is now more complex. We need more sophisticated leaders — people who not only understand what the needs are, but know how to attract, motivate, and retain good people to deliver on higher expectations. The trend in American education today is very much toward decentralization, which means that each school has its own unique characteristics, and therefore must have a leader who can adapt what’s happening in his or her building to the school’s environment.GAZETTE: What do principals need to learn to deal with all these challenges?O’NEILL: School principals need to be better prepared. Surveys of superintendents indicate that they are unhappy with the preparation school principals are getting. The research points out that you can’t have a great school without a great principal. You can have a great classroom if you have a great teacher, but the school can’t be great. It’s very much like business. In business, great leadership really matters. We’re focusing on effective leadership and management because they go hand in hand. We chose to focus on the principals because they get to make a lot of decisions. They decide who gets to work at the school and what the school culture will be. They decide what kind of equity is offered, what the children are learning, and how to inspire and motivate students.GROSSMAN: It doesn’t matter what sector you’re in — business, nonprofit, government, or education — you’re hard-pressed to find any outstanding, high-performing organization unless it has outstanding leadership. School principals need to be innovative, creative, and disciplined in terms of how and what we teach to our children. Schools need to create an environment where teachers can excel, where parents feel engaged, where students feel people care about them. And at the end of the day, that’s dependent upon the quality of the leader in the building.GAZETTE: Some people may question that schools cannot be run as corporations and principals are not CEOs. What’s your take on this?GROSSMAN: Principals have many of the same functions as CEOs, but they often bristle at the notion of being called CEOs, and there is no need to call them that. Schools can’t be run like a business. But can they adapt knowledge from the business world to the specific needs of schools? Yes. We’re not saying, “Here is what we do in business; now you go and do it in your schools.” In the year 2000, the Business School and the Ed School formed a program for urban school districts called the Public Education Leadership Project, which brought superintendents and their leadership teams to campus for a week. Many school districts that have improved their performance are members of this program.O’NEILL: Everybody knows that you can turn a school around if you have the right person at the helm who has high expectations and knows how to build a team that rows in the same direction. We think that the principal is really the single most important person in the building. We think we can make a difference and help principals turn around their schools, take them from good to great, and from excellent to outstanding.GAZETTE: Can you describe how the program can help principals improve their schools’ performance?GROSSMAN: There are many programs around leadership and management, but there aren’t a lot in the field of education. We tried to create content that is relevant, whether you’re a beginning principal or you’ve been in the seat for a long time. You can always improve. We’ve identified problems that are common to virtually all schools, and then adapted managerial and leadership ideas for the participants to apply. We use the case study method. This is not a course on theory that you then have to translate into practice. It does provide theory, but it also provides the way you can implement this theory in a school.O’NEILL: The program is very interactive, and the big focus is on practice. Everything is research-based and action-oriented. The idea is to help principals make things better. Principals will be able to work with other principals and create new social networks. The first course is “Leading Change,” and it has four parts, which deal with problem-solving strategies and building coalitions to work together, with how to develop a strong, positive school culture that supports teaching, learning, and the people within the building, and how to lead a diverse school community to make sure equity is at its core.GAZETTE: Would the program deal with the other challenges that principals face, such as teachers’ salaries, contracts, health insurance, pensions, etc.?O’NEILL: No one course can do everything. We’re working with the things you can change. One of the misconceptions is that often people don’t think they can change. They don’t think they have power and authority, but principals can change things, and they do have power and authority.GROSSMAN: Every single organization has external factors that limit its ability or interfere with its ability to perform. Within those constraints, every single organization can perform either at a lower level or optimize its results. What we observed in the Public Education Leadership Project is that the quality of the leadership and management plays a big role in performance improvement, regardless of constraints. We won’t be able to solve some issues, but we want to help people close the gap between their current performance and what is possible.O’NEILL: And ultimately, it’s for the benefit of students and their families. That’s what it’s all about. Our expectation is that an individual principal can take the course, and we welcome them, and whole districts can take the course too. A superintendent can transform a district by working with principals to implement the lessons taught in this course. The power and potential for change are enormous.This interview has been edited and condensed for length and clarity.last_img read more

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Adventure and Beer: Where to Unwind After a Day on the Trails in Southwest Virginia

first_imgA craft beer on a warm summer day tastes great. But after a day spent slaying singletrack with buddies, swapping out leads with a climbing partner, or hiking with the family, that beer tastes even better. Long ago, some brilliant outdoor enthusiasts paired beer with outdoor adventure and ever since it’s been a marriage made in heaven. In fact, the same thing could be said about food. Towns like Abingdon, VA have capitalized on this après-adventure market, growing their microbrewery and restaurant profile dramatically. Here is your guide to the best trail-to-tavern pairings in the region.Jay YoungVirginia Creeper Trail, Wolf Hills Brewery  Established in 2009 and named after Daniel Boone’s original name for the surrounding area that became Abingdon, Wolf Hills Brewery has turned into the place to visit for craft beers and live music after a long day pedaling the Virginia Creeper Trail, the renowned 34-mile bike trail with its western terminus in Abingdon. Wolf Hills’ Creeper Trail Pale Ale is a perfect post-ride brew that will have you reliving the highlights of the day and sharing stories and laughs with fellow adventurers in the region.Appalachian Trail, Damascus BreweryDamascus is known as Trail Town USA thanks to its proximity to the Appalachian Trail, the Virginia Creeper Trail, the Iron Mountain Trail, and the Trans American National Bicycle Trail. It’s also the gateway town for the Mount Rogers National Recreation Area, which features the highest peak in the state. Hikers and cyclists in the know head to Damascus Brewery to sample the small-batch craft beers after a long day in the woods. Damascus Brewery’s, D-town Brown Ale, and Backbone Bock have helped to soothe many sore legs and ignited future adventures in the region.Hidden Valley Climbing, Heartwood Artisan CenterJoe DeGaetanoHeartwood, Southwest Virginia’s artisan center located in Abingdon, makes the perfect stop after trashing yourself climbing on the newly opened sandstone crag, Hidden Valley. Hidden Valley Lake, located about halfway between Abingdon and Bristol, hosts more than 200 routes on bullet sandstone. The climbing runs the gamut from overhanging thuggery to thin delicate crimp work. Regardless of what and how much you climb, a local craft beer is sure to soothe those worked tendons and back muscles. Heartwood offers an unparalleled collection of #SWVA craft brews, with happy hour specials every Saturday. You’ll soon be hatching future plans to send that one route that shut you down.Hiking the Channels Trail, Harvest TableHarvest Table RestaurantWhile hiking and navigating through the rock corridors and labyrinth-like maze of boulders on the 6.6-mile, out-and- back Channels Trail, one will build up a hearty appetite. Luckily for you, the neo-Appalachian inspired, farm-to-table Harvest Table in nearby in Meadowview, Virginia, can help you refuel after your backcountry adventure. Harvest Table sources its food by working with local farmers, breweries and wineries. It tries to keep its carbon footprint as low as possible and chooses seasonal foods to highlight in the ever-changing menu. For more information, go to visitabingdonvirginia.comlast_img read more

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4 ways to dodge cybercrime when banking, shopping on mobile phones

first_img 14SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr The nature of identity fraud is changing. With the rollout of smart chips in credit and debit cards making it more difficult to steal using cards themselves, thieves have their eyes on your data instead.If you don’t protect yourself, you could join the 13.1 million Americans Javelin Strategy & Research  reported got hit by identity thieves in 2015.While mobile banking and payments are certainly making it easier and more convenient to handle one’s finances and conduct business, the same ease and convenience make them a ripe target for criminals, says Madeline Aufseeser, CEO of fraud-prevention company Tender Armor.“Because merchants are trying to make it easier for consumers to shop online and on their phones, all your credentials are stored online, including payment information, and you don’t even need a basket — just click a button and boom, you get charged. Because they have gone down this path of making things easier to purchase online, it makes it easier for the fraudsters to get to the data,” said Aufseeser. continue reading »last_img read more

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Police activity on Route 12 in Norwich

first_imgChenango County Sheriff’s dispatch has confirmed that the road is closed. No word on what led up to the closure or when the road will reopen. 12 News has reached out to State Police and are waiting to hear back from them. Stay with 12 News as this a developing story.center_img NORWICH (WBNG) – State Police and the Chenango County’s Sheriff’s office have closed Route 12 from Upper Ravine Road in Norwich at the Wal-mart to County Road 32B in Oxford Monday night.last_img

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Papuk Nature Park has retained the status of a UNESCO World Geopark

first_imgAs part of the regular revaluation process in July 2019, a two-member commission of UNESCO Geoparks visited. During the four-day visit to the Papuk Geopark, they were introduced to the progress made in the past two years, from infrastructure innovations, new projects, and they also met with stakeholders and representatives of local government. The UNESCO World Geoparks Council, based on the revalidator’s report, decided to extend the status of the UNESCO World Geoparks for four years, citing recommendations for work in the coming period. “We base the entire future of the Park on the signature of UNESCO. And our biggest Geopriče project is named after him. Therefore, the entire progress of the tourist offer of the Park, which is carried out for the benefit of the local community, is happening largely due to the status of the UNESCO geopark. We are extremely happy and proud that our membership in the world community of geoparks has been extended for another four years. ” – said on this occasion Alen Jurenac, director of the Park. In the Papuk Nature Park, near Voćin, there is the first geological monument of nature in the Republic of Croatia, protected back in 1948 due to a unique morphological phenomenon in Croatia – the columnar eruption of volcanic rocks. Papuk was protected in the category of nature park in 1999 due to its exceptional natural value, which includes a great diversity of habitats and species of plants and animals, but also geological diversity represented in numerous geological formations formed in different periods of the Earth’s past. Photo: PP Papuk Papuk Nature Park, otherwise the first UNESCO geopark in the Republic of Croatia, has retained the status of a world geopark. Of particular value are the numerous fossil finds of organisms that lived in the “Pannonian Sea” 16 million years ago.last_img read more

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Indonesia taxes tech companies through new regulation

first_imgRead also: Indonesia’s COVID-19 stimulus playbook, explainedThe significant economic presence will be determined through the companies’ gross circulated product, sales and/or active users in Indonesia, the Perppu reads. Those with a significant economic presence will be declared permanent establishments and, thus, are subject to domestic tax regulations.“Indonesia’s tax base will move toward digital taxation as online transactions have been growing significantly, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic,” Finance Minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati said during a teleconferenced press briefing on Wednesday.She said companies like streaming service Netflix and online meeting app Zoom are a few examples of foreign businesses with a significant economic presence in the country. A recent report by Statqo Analytics revealed that active Zoom users increased by 183 percent last month, especially since most businesses in the country implemented work-from-home on March 16.The government has struggled to tax digital companies that have limited or no physical presence in Indonesia but pocket a significant amount of revenues from the country. It previously incorporated regulations about digital tax in the omnibus bill on taxation submitted to the House of Representatives in February for deliberation.The government and the House have yet to start the deliberations.Read also: Indonesia’s economy may contract 0.4% in worst case scenario: Sri MulyaniThe Perppu also states that if the government cannot declare a digital company a permanent establishment because of the existence of a tax treaty with a certain country, it will then charge an electronic transaction tax on the company’s sales in Indonesia.Further provisions on the rates, object and calculation of the income tax and the electronic transactions tax will be regulated in a government regulation (PP).Article 7 regulates that digital companies that fail to comply with the rules would face an administrative sanction and even have their internet access cut by the telecommunication minister.Previously, a Netflix spokesperson told The Jakarta Post that the company supported the introduction of a digital tax in Indonesia when asked about the content of the omnibus bill on taxation.Topics : The Indonesian government has officially assumed the authority to tax digital companies operating in the country following the issuance of a new government regulation in lieu of law (Perppu) on Tuesday.The Perppu, which takes effect on Tuesday and aims to support the government’s efforts to fight the adverse economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, states that the companies will be charged value added tax (VAT) on taxable intangible goods and/or services sold through electronic platforms.The government also charges income tax or electronic transaction tax on e-commerce activities carried out by foreign individuals or digital companies with a significant economic presence, according to Article 6.last_img read more

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Michael Parsons, 58, Oxford: Feb. 4, 1955 – April 30, 2013

first_imgMichael Parsons, 58, of Oxford died Tuesday, April 30, 2013 at his home in Oxford.Following cremation, no services will be held.  A Memorial has been established with the Humane Society and may be left with Oxford Funeral Service. For further information or to send a condolence please visit www.oxfordfuneralservice.com.Michael D. Parsons was born on February 4, 1955 the son of Darl C. and Jo Ann (Paton) Parsons in Winfield. He was a 1973 graduate of the Oxford High School in Oxford. Michael was an Auto Mechanic as well as an Oil Field Pumper for many years. He enjoyed fishing and hunting and also liked to garden.Survivors include his parents, Darl and Jo Ann Parsons of Oxford, brother, Scott Parsons of Wichita, Kans., sisters, Barbara Dietz and husband Steven of Merriam, Kans. and Judith Parsons of Independence, MO, and nephews, Joshua and Brian Parsons of Overland Park.Preceding him in death are his grandparents.last_img read more

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