Volleyball sweeps SDSU, falls to USD to end tournament

first_imgAnother series win lands TCU Baseball in the top 5, earns Sikes conference award Twitter Equestrian defeated in Big 12 Championship Dean Strakahttps://www.tcu360.com/author/dean-straka/ Facebook Dean Straka Linkedin Linkedin Dean Strakahttps://www.tcu360.com/author/dean-straka/ TCU rowing program strengthens after facing COVID-19 setbacks Equestrian upsets No. 1 Baylor, swept by Texas A&M at NCEA Championships Men’s tennis clinches consecutive Big 12 titles with win over No. 4 Baylor ReddItcenter_img ReddIt Dean Strakahttps://www.tcu360.com/author/dean-straka/ TCU baseball finds their biggest fan just by saying hello + posts Twitter printTCU Volleyball wrapped up its schedule at the SDSU/USD Invitational in San Diego, Calif. Saturday. The team swept the San Diego State University Aztecs before falling to the University of San Diego Toreros.The team’s victory over San Diego State Saturday afternoon marked the first time the team had ever swept its first five opponents of the season. The team had previously broken the record on Friday when the Frogs swept Dartmouth College for four straight sweeps to begin the year.The Frogs recorded 42 kills in the match against the Aztecs. They were led by junior Jillian Bergeson who totaled 12 kills.“In the first set at the end, Jillian just absolutely put the team on her back and just ran with it,” TCU Director of Volleyball Jill Kramer said. “She did a good job there.”Senior Blaire Pickens also had a strong outing with eight kills in the match.Kramer praised her team for being able to execute necessary adjustments throughout the match.“We had to mix up what we were doing and move the ball around really well to score,” Kramer said. “I think their outside hitters really started to pick apart our defense, so this match for us was the first time that we had to make true adjustments this season during the match, which I thought the team did a really good job of that.”The Frogs’ winning streak would came to a halt when they were swept by the No. 23 University of San Diego Toreros just hours after defeating San Diego State.The Frogs’ offense struggled, recording only 26 kills during the match.Junior Ashley Smith had the strongest performance among TCU players in the loss, tallying eight kills, five blocks, and six digs against the Toreros.“I think tonight we played a very good San Diego team at home and I think they came out really strong, served tough, blocked and defended well and our passing game broke down really early which affected us offensively,” Kramer said.Kramer added that the team could use improvement handling adversity.We struggled rebounding from that and we need to get better at that,” Kramer said. “We need to get better at dealing with some adversity. We have really been taking it to teams and putting pressure on them and tonight, San Diego did a really good job of serving the ball to the same players all night long.”The Frogs exit the weekend sitting at 5-1 on the season and will return to action next weekend when they compete in the Allstate Sugar Bowl Collegiate Classic in New Orleans from Sept. 11-12. Dean Strakahttps://www.tcu360.com/author/dean-straka/ Facebook Dean Straka is a senior journalism major from Lake Forest, California. He currently serves as Sports Line Editor for TCU 360. His passions include golf, God, traveling, and sitting down to watch the big game of the day. Follow him on Twitter at @dwstraka49 Previous articleTCU experiences lower crime rate in AugustNext articleMan posing as Uber Driver picks up female students Dean Straka RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Norrie climbs to No. 1 in national rankingslast_img read more

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Pasadena Restaurant Indoor Dining, Theaters, Gyms Cleared to Reopen Once County Enters ‘Red’ Tier

first_img Make a comment EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS <span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span><span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>Indoor restaurant service, movie theaters and gyms will be among the long-shuttered businesses allowed to reopen at limited capacity in Pasadena once the region ascends from the “purple” tier to the “red” tier under the state’s pandemic reopening guidelines, which authorities now say is expected to occur sometime between Monday and Wednesday.Gov. Gavin Newsom announced on Wednesday that the state was on the verge of meeting its goal of vaccinating 2 million people statewide in at-risk communities, which would allow Los Angeles County and others to accelerate their move into the less-restrictive category.State policy allows for increased activity including limited indoor dining, movie theater screenings, gym operation and museum tours, as well as the reopening of schools through 12th grade. Health officials at both the city and county level announced Thursday that they would adjust local public health policies to allow activities permitted under state guidelines.But while Newsom previously said the shift may occur as early as Friday, Pasadena and L.A. County public health officials said Thursday that the move to the “red” tier would likely occur sometime between Monday and Wednesday.Under the new guidelines, which will take effect once the state confirms the county has entered “red” tier status, indoor dining is permitted at a capacity of up to 25%, along with museums, aquariums and zoos. Masks and other requirements, including that dining tables being spaces 8 feet apart or more, are also mandated.Movie theaters will be permitted to host showings with audiences limited to 25% capacity and only with reserved seating to ensure social distancing.Gyms, dance studios, fitness centers and similar businesses will be permitted to operate indoors at 10% capacity.Retail stores, malls and personal care services will be permitted to expand capacity to 50%. with masking required at all times and for all services.Schools, which are currently only permitted to resume in-person instruction for grades 6 and below, will be permitted to reopen in-person classes through high school.But as restrictions lift, the city’s efforts to enforce remaining COVID-19 protocols will only increase, Derderian said.While it was hoped the new activity would give a much-needed boost to the local economy, officials did not want to see the virus take hold again.“We still will adhere to strict COVID protocols, both for customers and employees,” according to Derderian. “We need everybody to still follow the regulations, otherwise, it’s one step forward and two steps back.”Pasadena reported eight new COVID-19 infections and five additional deaths on Thursday, according to city spokeswoman Lisa Derderian.Several of the deaths were believed to have resulted from infections contracted during holiday gatherings, she said.All but one of the eight new infected patients detected Thursday were under 50 years old, Derderian added.In total, Pasadena health officials had recorded 11,011 confirmed COVID-19 infections and 327 fatalities Over the prior week, an average of seven new infections per day were reported.Huntington Hospital reported treating 30 COVID-19 patients on Thursday, with eight of them in intensive care units.At the county level, authorities announced 1,378 new infections and 101 additional deaths, bringing the totals in L.A. County to 1,208,024 known cases of the virus and 22,304 fatalities.The L.A. County Department of Public Health reported 1,056 COVID-19 patients hospitalized across the county on Thursday, with 30% of them being treated in ICUs.There are 1,056 people with COVID-19 currently hospitalized and 30% of these people are in the ICU. Testing results are available for nearly 5,927,000 individuals with 19% of people testing positive. Today’s daily test positivity rate is 2.1%.L.A. County Director of Public Health Barbara Ferrer again expressed condolences to those mourning a family member or loved one lost to COVID-19.“To the families and friends mourning the loss of a loved one to COVID-19, we wish you healing and peace,” she said.“We plan to move into the red tier very soon, and that allows for more re-openings and permitted activities in L.A. County. This milestone is the result of businesses and individuals working together and doing their part to prevent COVID-19 from spreading,” Ferrer said.“It will be up to everyone, businesses and residents, to continue driving down transmission and to follow safety directives closely to keep everyone as safe as possible by preventing increases in cases,” she added. “When even relatively small numbers of businesses and individuals fail to adhere to the safety precautions, many others experience tragic consequences.”The California Department of Public Health reported 3,184 new infections and 270 additional deaths on Thursday, raising the statewide tallies to 3,516,862 COVID-19 cases and 54,891 fatalities.The statewide average positivity rate over the prior week was recorded at 2.4%, while the 14-day average stood at 2.3%.As of Thursday, L.A. County represented 34% of California COVID-19 infections and 41% of the state’s deaths. Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Community News Community News Pasadena Restaurant Indoor Dining, Theaters, Gyms Cleared to Reopen Once County Enters ‘Red’ Tier Restrictions now expected to be lifted early next week By BRIAN DAY Published on Thursday, March 11, 2021 | 4:36 pm Community News CITY NEWS SERVICE/STAFF REPORT Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Business News Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Subscribecenter_img faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Donald CommunityPCC- COMMUNITYVirtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes HerbeautyYou Can’t Go Past Our Healthy Quick RecipesHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyJennifer Lopez And Alex Rodriguez’s Wedding DelayedHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWant To Seriously Cut On Sugar? You Need To Know A Few TricksHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyNow She’s 19 – Look At Her Transformation! Incredible!HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThe Most Heartwarming Moments Between Father And DaughterHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyIs It Normal To Date Your BFF’s Ex?HerbeautyHerbeauty STAFF REPORT First Heatwave Expected Next Week Top of the News 24 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Your email address will not be published. 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Unequal access

first_img Read Full Story Conducting research projects among mothers and infants in Brazil in the mid-2000s, Paola Gilsanz got to see firsthand the effects of health inequalities. She saw that, all too often, good health was elusive if you were poor, lacking education, or didn’t have access to adequate care.Gilsanz is now on track to graduate with a Ph.D. in social epidemiology—which focuses on societal factors that affect health—from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) in May 2014. “The reward is great,” she said. “I can use the tools of public health I’ve learned at HSPH to help others.”Gilsanz is currently at work on her dissertation, which is focused on the association between depressive symptoms and risk of stroke. She hopes her research will provide clues to if and how depressive symptoms physiologically impact health. “A lot of research has been done on stroke before depression,” she said, “but I’m looking at it in the other way. I hope to improve our understanding of how emotions like stress or depressive symptoms can also have physical health repercussions.”last_img read more

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Strategic Hispanic growth plans begin with readiness assessment

first_imgThe Hispanic market is the largest, fastest-growing segment in this country, but that’s only one reason U.S. credit unions are working hard to learn more about this demographic.Smart credit union executives understand the Hispanic population is very young compared to other U.S. ethnic groups. This presents an opportunity to lower the average age of membership by bringing Hispanics into the fold. Hispanics are also disproportionately underserved, and credit union leaders view helping Hispanics navigate the U.S. financial system as an important part of the overall credit union mission. Lastly, the face of the American consumer is changing, and growing membership means adapting to consumers, rather than forcing them to adapt to the credit union.Seeing the benefit of serving the Hispanic population is one thing. Truly understanding what it takes to do so is another. To gain that understanding, credit unions must begin by examining their current outreach and potential for growth.One way credit unions have pursued this is through strategic planning designed specifically to meet a Hispanic membership growth objective. The most effective plans not only include a roadmap; they also supply a solid benchmark so that credit unions can effectively measure their success and prove the return on their investment.The first step to drafting a good strategic plan is uncovering a credit union’s readiness to reach a new market. Or for those credit unions that have already begun, understanding staff’s readiness to take their efforts to the next level.For its part, the roadmap portion of the strategic plan outlines how a credit union can implement tactics in the proper sequence. This allows the team leading the effort to achieve results much faster and much more cost-effectively than they may without a charted course.A few key questions a credit union should ask and answer as they build out their strategic plan include:Is the credit union well positioned to target and serve the Hispanic market? How many Hispanic members is the credit union currently serving? How many Hispanic members could the credit union serve and what is the income potential? We refer to three stages in the quest to become a successful Hispanic-community credit union: Discovery, Emerging and Best Practice.Credit unions in the Discovery phase are considering Hispanic outreach but have not yet pulled the trigger on any tactical portions of a strategic plan. In fact, most do not yet have a fully formulated plan. They want to learn more; leaders just don’t quite know where to start.In the Emerging phase, credit union staff have recognized the benefits and importance of serving the Hispanic community. They have laid the foundation and taken steps to adapt their products and services to Hispanic members (rather than waiting for the Hispanic members to adapt to them).Best Practices credit unions have successfully served the market for years. They are preferred by Hispanics in their area, have strong financial educational programs and maintain an innovative growth culture.Hispanic growth plans represent an indispensable investment in the future. Yet having a plan on its own will not generate the kind of success a credit union needs. Readiness to executive must be achieved first. Only then can the integration of a Hispanic growth strategy with the credit union’s overall strategic future create sustainable success.To learn more, read the full white paper; “Asking the Right Questions.” 90SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Miriam De Dios Woodward Miriam De Dios Woodward is the CEO of PolicyWorks, LLC. She also serves as Senior Vice President of AMC, the holding company of the Iowa Credit Union League and parent … Web: https://www.policyworksllc.com Detailslast_img read more

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Saints added some grit to lineup of two-time defending BCIHL champs

first_imgThe Selkirk Saints added some grit to the lineup for the 2014/15 B.C. Intercollegiate Hockey League season.The Saints announced a playing commitment from forward Tyler Kerner of Taber, Alta., to attend Selkirk College.”Tyler is a hard-working, physical winger who plays the game with lots of energy and competes hard,” head coach Jeff Dubois of the two-time defending BCIHL Champion Saints said. “He really fits the profile of the type of player we were looking to add to what is shaping up as a very skilled group. We see Tyler being a guy who sets a physical tone for us and who makes himself and his line difficult to play against, particularly versus top players on other teams.”Kerner is a 5-foot-11, 205 pound winger who spent the last three seasons in the Alberta Junior Hockey League playing with the Lloydminster Bobcats, Drumheller Dragons and Olds Grizzlys.He split the 2013/14 campaign between Drumheller and Olds, where he scored once while adding nine assists and 85 penalty minutes in 36 regular season and playoff games.Over the course of his Junior A career, Kerner scored nine goals and totaled 32 points and 255 penalty minutes in 112 AJHL games. “I’m very excited to start my post-secondary career with the Saints and join a winning organization,” said Kerner, who describes himself as playing a physical, simple, role game while taking pride in taking care of his own zone first.”I think of myself as a leader who is willing to do whatever it takes to win. I work very well beneath the crease protecting the puck while trying to find players to set up in the offensive zone.” Kerner plans to enter Selkirk’s Business Administration program.”I’m looking forward to moving to the community of Castlegar, as it reminds me of the town I was raised in,” Kerner explains.”The small classes are also a huge benefit, knowing that there will be more attention to help me get the most out of my schooling. My academic goal this year will be to achieve a GPA of 3.5 or higher. On the ice, I want to develop my game while helping my team capture a third straight BCIHL championship.” Kerner is the Saints’ ninth commitment for the 2014/15 season, joining forwards Ryan Edwards (Beaver Valley, KIJHL), Jamie Vlanich (Nelson Leafs, KIJHL), Alex Milligan (Peninsula Panthers, VIJHL), Matt Martin (Ontario Avalanche, WSHL) and Connor Beauchemin (Castlegar Rebels, KIJHL), as well as defencemen Curtis Toneff (Campbell River Storm, VIJHL) and Danny Vlanich (Surrey Eagles, BCHL), and goaltender Steven Glass (Nipawin Hawks, SJHL).last_img read more

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Greenwood hosts second successful rugby bash

first_imgGreenwood was full of Rugby players again last weekend for the Boundary Bash Social 10s Rugby Tournament. This is the second year they have hosted this tournament and this year they were larger by just one team.Organizer and Jewel Lake resident Oliver Glaser said the tournament was a success, particularly in regards to the social aspect.Everyone had fun and the City of Greenwood opened up O’Hairi Park as a campsite for the rugby players, he said.This year’s teams included the East Vancouver Scribes, who technically hosted the event because Glaser still plays on their team, the Trail Colonials, the Grand Forks Wanderers, the Ridge Meadow Bruins (Maple Ridge) and the Nelson Grizzlies.The Grizzlies easily won the tournament because they won all their games and had the most ‘tries’ – goal attempts. There was only one woman’s team, which came from Ridge Meadows. The men’s teams played a few games with them and some of the woman joined the men’s teams and played along with them.“One woman player on the Grizzlies,” said Glaser, noting that she played exceptionally well. “She was fit and toned and ran hard. She ran really good lines.”The Trail Colonials were awarded the most social team and Bryan Louzon was awarded the most social player.Glaser said the games were all really good and that the level of play was strong this year. The players followed the rules and there was no kicking or fighting.Ingram Creek Saddlery donated a custom-made leather ball for the winning team again this year. Glaser said this makes them stand out from other tournaments.“It’s a really special thing,” he said.  New to the tournament this year was a kids touch game and a concession stand. They had about 100 people as spectators and everyone seemed to have a good time, said Glaser.The only real complaint was about the noise from the music at the campsite at night. Glaser said he hadn’t considered how much the noise would carry and that he would consider a noise curfew the next year.Glaser is hoping to host the event this year but says it depends on what the numbers look like after they have done their calculations. He is happy if they are just able to break even because it’s all about having fun, but if the host team has lost a lot of money they may not host it again next year.last_img read more

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L.A. still at risk of attack

first_img“We are not safe and we will not be safe for many years,” LAPD Deputy Chief Mark Leap said at the forum sponsored by the university’s School of Public Affairs. “There are many, many more people who consider themselves jihadists now. And criminal enterprises are being used to support terrorist activities.” Officials said the links between organized crime and terrorism are particularly troubling in light of a message posted on an al-Qaida Web site saying the group wants to kill 4 million Americans in retribution for the number of Muslims killed by the U.S. and its allies in recent years. “Al-Qaida recently announced on their Web site that they have two main targets – Los Angeles and Melbourne, Australia,” said Michael Intriligator, a terrorism expert and UCLA professor who moderated the forum. “I don’t know why they picked Melbourne, but Los Angeles was specifically mentioned as a target for their next terrorist attack.” Intriligator said Los Angeles has a number of potential targets, including LAX, its downtown skyscrapers and the nation’s largest port complex. He is especially concerned about the potential for an attack using a black-market nuclear device. “I think we are not at all prepared for this and we are living in what psychologists call a state of denial,” Intriligator said. “It’s such a horrendous thing to think about. We think it happened way back in 2001 and that it can’t happen again.” Gang involvement Sheriff’s Department Lt. John Sullivan, who helped found the county’s Terrorism Early Warning Group that has since been emulated by 26 cities nationwide, said organized crime groups in Los Angeles County are supporting international terrorists. “Al-Qaida has stated their intent to obtain nuclear weapons,” he said. “Whether they can do so is unknown. They have often in the past made good on their threats. So it’s reasonable to believe that it’s viable. “As far as attacking Los Angeles, they have attempted to attack Los Angeles in the past. It’s reasonable to believe they will again.” Sullivan also said officials are concerned about the notorious MS-13 street gang and its involvement in human smuggling and other activities on behalf of organized crime syndicates. “MS-13 has a lot of the characteristics that could facilitate terrorist activities,” Sullivan said. Brian Michael Jenkins, a terrorism expert at the Rand Corp., said officials are especially concerned about growing organized criminal activity and lawlessness in parts of Mexico and South America, the erosion of government authority and whether terrorist groups can exploit the situation to attack the U.S. “When we have criminal organizations becoming more powerful than the government then we will end up with increasing militarization along the southern border,” Jenkins said. Since the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, Jenkins said, the U.S. government has made undeniable progress in degrading the capabilities of al-Qaida, destroying its training camps, disrupting its flow of funding and thwarting a number of terrorist plots around the globe. “But we’ve had failures as well,” Jenkins said. “What we have not been able to do is dent their determination one bit. We have not been able to stop them from turning angry young men around the world into self-destructing terrorists.” [email protected] (213) 974-8985 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Are we safer today from terrorists than we were on 9-11? No, according to a panel of experts at a forum Monday at University of California, Los Angeles. America is just as vulnerable to attack as it was on 9-11, with street gangs funding terrorist groups and also draining resources from law enforcement agencies working to head off future attacks. The experts said the war on terrorism has been replaced by the war on gangs – a huge concern in Los Angeles, which has an estimated 40,000 gang members and is an attractive target for terrorists. last_img read more

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Next up for the Raiders: Unbeaten Miami and 5 reasons to remain hopeful

first_imgClick HERE if you’re having trouble viewing the gallery on your mobile device.The Raiders were embarrassed in their opener against the Rams. They (and their fans) were stunned Sunday by the Broncos.Don’t take my word for it:Raiders fans after starting 0-2 in this Gruden era. pic.twitter.com/h8QVNlfRFj — Bleacher Report (@BleacherReport) September 16, 2018There’s no sugar-coating it — the Raiders had the Broncos beat, and, just guessing here, the only noise on the flight home …last_img

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Growing Our Generation

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest  Leave a CommentStay connected to young Ohio farmers and ag professionals by subscribing to the Growing Our Generation e-newsletter. Discover insights and ideas directly from Ohio’s young farmers and food and agricultural professionals. Make ConnectionsGuest editors from across Ohio offer unique outlooks on current issues impacting young farmers.New OpportunitiesGet the latest on statewide events and learn how you can get involved in your community.Mobile FriendlyDelivered to your inbox every two weeks.SUBSCRIBEPAST FEATURED EDITORS State YAP CommitteeAnnie Lohstroh, Pickaway CountyJesse Whinnery, Coshocton CountyRyan Matthews, Highland CountyVictoria Popp, Clermont CountyNicole Steiner, Wayne CountyBrynn and Christian Hoffman, Fairfield CountyOhio State Fair editionExploreAg program internsCambell and Jessica Parrish, Champaign CountyHannah Schrader, Hocking CountyDoug and Lisa Kahlig, Mercer CountyMicaela Wright, Darke CountyEmily Krikke, Huron CountyMarissa Mulligan, Franklin CountyAdele Flynn, Lorain CountyAmanda Barndt, Wood CountyJD Bethel, Champaign County,Willie and Brooke Murphy, Clinton CountyBrady Campbell, Washington CountyMegan Lezzer, Wayne CountyErika Murray, Morrow CountyJ.L. and Jessica Draganic, Fayette CountyAnna Stroud, Brown CountySara Tallmadge, Ashland CountySam Cunningham, Muskingum CountyLeslie Cooksey, Pickaway CountyNick and Bailey Elchinger, Henry CountyDave and Elizabeth Petro, Ashtabula CountyMatt and Rachel Heimerl, Licking CountyKyle and Ashley Culp, Wood CountyLuke and Cassandra Dull, Montgomery CountyPeter and Sarah Motts, Stark CountyCharlie and Casey Ellington, Stark CountyWes and Brandi Montgomery, Fayette CountyDustin and Casey Converse, Union CountyAustin Heil, Hardin CountyKyle Smith, Clark CountyNick and Macy Staggs, Adams CountyJosh Henderson, Muskingum CountyJonathan and Shana Angel, Tuscarawas CountyJoe and Jennifer Osterholt, Licking CountySteve and Maggie Ruggles – Hancock CountyJake Bodimer, Gallia CountyAndy and Tera Wentling, Stark CountyDuayne and Monica Wetherell, Jefferson CountyKayla Weaver, Wyandot CountyAbby Snyder, Ross CountyTim and Sarah Terrill, Montgomery CountyNick and Becca Kocher, Crawford CountyTrish Levering, Knox CountyJennifer Wilson, Van Wert CountyGreg and Theresa Corcoran, Ross CountyChristen Clemson, Trumbull CountyDr. Emily Buck, Marion CountyElizabeth Long, Madison CountyAdam and Jess Campbell, Warren CountyLatham and Katie Farley, Montgomery CountyLyndsey Murphy, Champaign CountyEric and Shelly Prysi, Tuscarawas CountyDoug Toops, Clark CountyHannah Scott, Brown CountyMatt and Morgan Aultman, Darke CountyVictoria Shaw, Medina CountyRyan Conklin, Delaware CountyMarlene Eick, Delaware CountyTaysha Reitzel, Williams CountyKristin Reese, Fairfield CountyRon Burns, Union CountyRose Hartschuh, Crawford CountyDerek Schmitt, Fairfield CountyMichelle and Kelly Abfall, Athens CountyBrad Heimerl, Licking CountySarah and Aaron Heilers, Shelby CountyAndy and Danielle Burch, Columbiana CountyLiz and Matt Funderburgh, Union CountyGreg & Janet McGlinch, Darke CountyKarl Wedemeyer, Marion CountyDr. Terri Specht, Tuscarawas CountyAshton and Kyle Walls, Knox CountyNathan and Jennifer Brown, Highland County  Leave a Commentlast_img read more

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Joyent Relaunches Node.js Service, Announces Cloud Analytics

first_imgCloud hosting provider Joyent re-launched its Node.js hosting service no.de this week. Joyent, the sponsor company of Node.js, is now offering versions 0.4.0 and 0.4.1 to no.de users. It also announced Cloud Analytics, a new service for finding problems with Node.js applications. Related Posts According to a blog post by Joyent’s Dave Pacheco, Cloud Analytics is a ” tool for real-time performance analysis of production systems and applications deployed in the cloud.” So far it’s only available for Node.js and most of the metrics require version 0.4.0.Cloud Analytics can monitor:Node.js 0.4.x: HTTP server operations decomposed by method, URL, remote IP, remote port, and latency.Node.js 0.4.x: HTTP client operations decomposed by method, URL, server address, server port, and latency.Node.js 0.4.x: garbage collection operations decomposed by GC type and latency. Node.js 0.4.x: socket operations decomposed by type, remote host and port, size, and buffered data.Filesystem: logical filesystem operations decomposed by pid, application name, zone name (SmartMachine name), operation type, filesystem type, and latency.CPU: thread executions decomposed by pid, application name, zone name, runtime, and reason leaving CPU.The Node.js hosting space continues to heat up. We’ve covered other entrant to the field including Nodejitsu, NodeSocket and Nodester. To understand the interest in Node.js, you might want to read our interview with Guillermo Rauch.Also, Joyent’s chief evangelist Tom Hughs-Croucher released a full preview of his book on Node.js today. A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… klint finley Tags:#cloud#Cloud Providers Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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