Watch Holly Bowling Break Down Her Transcription Of Phish’s ‘It’s Ice’ For Piano

first_imgPianist Holly Bowling has taken the music of Phish to new heights, transcribing it for piano and performing these stripped-down versions for fans everywhere. Bowling turned heads with her performance of the full “Tahoe Tweezer,” and continues to impress with her unique interpretations of Phish’s improvisations.Of course, Phish’s music isn’t all improvised, and one of the more rigorous compositions by the band is their song “It’s Ice.” Bowling just released an intriguing video for Phish phans, where she talks about the transcription process and performs!Watch Bowling’s new video, streaming below.last_img

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Notre Dame students travel to Iowa for 3-day trip through Pete for America campaign

first_imgKelli Smith | The Observer A student hugs Pete Buttigieg after his rally in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, on Saturday.The rally took place in Cedar Rapids on Saturday and was one of Buttigieg’s “Get Out The Caucus” events in Iowa. A presidential candidate vying for the momentous Iowan vote, Buttigieg made his last pitch to those in the area in hopes of earning their support before Monday’s caucuses.The night before the rally, 11 Notre Dame students traveled from South Bend to Cedar Rapids through a trip funded by the Pete for America campaign. The self-organized group hoped to impact the political process, sophomore Matheo Vidal said. Buttigieg’s position as former mayor of South Bend made that possible.“We’ve been really lucky to have a presidential campaign in our backyards,” Vidal said.Iowa was the first state to participate in the 2020 election season and has been the stomping ground for most presidential hopefuls in recent months. Democratic candidates had the chance to earn 41 delegates of the 1,991 needed to win the party’s nomination.Students who participated in the trip took part in a range of political events in Iowa until Monday evening, including Saturday’s rally and canvassing across Cedar Rapids on Sunday. CEDAR RAPIDS, IA — Pete Buttigieg took the stage in front of a roaring crowd.  More than 600 women, men, children and voters cheered rambunctiously as the presidential hopeful launched into one of his last pleas for Iowan Democrats. As he spoke, a group of Notre Dame students huddled together, waving vibrant “Pete 2020” signs and clamoring for a closer look at one of Buttigieg’s last rallies before the Iowa caucuses.“The energy is crazy,” sophomore Hayleigh Rockenback said. “Everyone’s just so happy.” Kelli Smith | The Observer A group of 11 Notre Dame students attended one of Pete Buttigieg’s last rallies on Saturday before the Iowa Caucuses.“It [was] really exciting to be in Iowa and feel the democratic spirit,” sophomore Emma Dudrick said.Though they met Iowans with ideologies across the political spectrum, most residents remained civil and respectful as students canvassed door-to-door, Rockenback said.“We were real-life people there to answer questions, which I think just makes such a big impact, more so than like reading it online or watching the news,” she said.As a New York native, Dudrick said she was initially upset since her home state is “so important electorally” yet receives little attention compared to Iowa. After being in Cedar Rapids, however, she says her viewpoint changed.“Being here, the people here are so involved and they care so much,” Dudrick said. “I thought the caucus was kind of a weird thing, but it’s so amazing [how] the people here are so involved [and] I think it’s because of where they are.”After hearing about how most Iowans tend to attend rallies for each candidate ahead of the caucuses, Rockenback realized how immersed Iowans are in the election.“I didn’t even realize it was such a big deal until I got here,” Rockenback said. “People take it very seriously.”center_img Kelli Smith | The Observer Sophomores Hayleigh Rockenback and Emma Dudrick look at their list of Iowan houses they planned to visit on Sunday to canvass for Pete Buttigieg, the former South Bend mayor.Coming from Notre Dame, Dudrick asserted the “unique” political landscape on campus made her more considerate of issues prominent in the 2020 election cycle since she’s met people with both similar and opposing views on campus.“It’s just so interesting that we don’t go to a very, very liberal school, so we get to have those conversations with people,” she said.Rockenback said participating in the political process on the ground in Iowa made her aware of the tangible impact she could have on the election, no matter the caucus results.“I feel like I’m making a real impact,” she said.Tags: 2020 election season, Iowa caucuses, Pete Buttigieglast_img read more

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Pac-Man Game Turns 40

first_imgJAMESTOWN – Pac-Man turns 40 today.It debuted in a Tokyo arcade on May 22, 1980 and became a game-changer in the video game world.It went on to become the most successful arcade game of all time. It led to all kinds of merchandise and became an icon of 1980’s pop culture.Pac-Man’s official website says it’s one of the most recognized images on the planet, with 90 percent brand recognition around the world. It all started with a young game designer named Toru Iwatani, who created the game for the Japanese games firm Namco.He says he never thought it would be loved and played so widely throughout the world. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img

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Energy transition prompts Peabody to write down value of largest U.S. coal mine by $1.42 billion

first_imgEnergy transition prompts Peabody to write down value of largest U.S. coal mine by $1.42 billion FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):The largest coal mining company in the United States substantially lowered the value of one of its top-producing thermal coal assets based on low expectations for future coal demand.Peabody Energy Corp. impaired the value of its North Antelope Rochelle coal mine in Wyoming by $1.42 billion in the second quarter. Peabody said it was lowering the expected value of the coal mine, the largest in the United States, because of assumptions regarding lower long-term natural gas prices, the timing of coal plant retirements, and continued growth from renewable generation.“While we still believe coal is essential to a reliable energy grid and that our [Powder River Basin] assets are best positioned to serve that demand … we do expect coal’s long-term share of the U.S. generation mix to remain below prior-year levels,” Peabody CFO Mark Spurbeck said on the company’s Aug. 5 earnings call.Production from the North Antelope mine has dropped drastically in recent years. U.S. Mine Safety and Health Administration data shows the company produced about 30.7 million tons of coal in the fourth quarter of 2014, a near-term high for the mine. Quarterly production from North Antelope dropped below 20 million tons for the first time in recent history in the first quarter of 2020, and second-quarter production totaled just 14.0 million tons. Peabody delivered coal from North Antelope to 84 power plants across the U.S. in 2019, according to S&P Global Market Intelligence data.“This is a clear signal that Powder River Basin coal production isn’t coming back and the multi-year decline that was prevalent before the pandemic will continue long after the virus is gone,” Shannon Anderson, the staff attorney for the Powder River Basin Resource Council, said in an emailed statement about the impairment. “It’s time for Wyoming leaders to think about what comes next for our communities, coal miners, and our revenue streams.”Peabody Energy had $6.54 billion in total assets as of the end of 2019 but reported $4.95 billion in total assets on its balance sheet as of the end of June. Including the impairment, the company booked a $1.54 billion net loss, or $15.78 per share, in the quarter.[Taylor Kuykendall]More ($): Lower expectations drive Peabody’s $1.42B impairment of largest U.S. coal minelast_img read more

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FIFA serves notice it will defend itself against TTFA in local court

first_imgPORT OF SPAIN, Trinidad (CMC) — FIFA has signalled it will defend itself against a legal challenge filed by the former executive of the Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) by filing an entry of appearance in the High Court here on Tuesday.Football’s world governing body has retained the Port of Spain law firm of Dr Claude Denbow SC. The entry of appearance was filed by instructing attorney Donna Denbow, with Jerome Rajcoomar listed as junior counsel.Ousted TTFA President William Wallace and his team, represented by Dr Emir Crowne and Matthew Gayle, are challenging Fifa’s decision to remove them and appoint a normalisation committee to run the association’s affairs.The Wallace-led executive had initially taken their case to the Switzerland-based Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS), but withdrew the matter earlier this month saying they were not likely to be get a fair hearing, given some of the decisions CAS had taken in the early stages of the case.With FIFA having filed an appearance to claim, it has 28 days from the May 19 date when it was served with notice of the TTFA’s claim to file a defence.The local football association is seeking the court’s intervention by way of a declaration that Fifa’s removal of the TTFA executive, which was elected to office on November 24, 2019, is null, void and of no legal and/or binding effect; a permanent injunction preventing FIFA from interfering in, and/or seeking to override the fair and transparent democratic processes of the TTFA and/or from attempting removing the duly elected executive from office; and a permanent injunction preventing FIFA and/or its agents and/or assigns and/or servants from interfering in the day-to-day management of the TTFA, including the association’s bank accounts and real property.FIFA said it removed the executive because of mounting and potentially crippling debt, insisting that the local body faced “a very real risk of insolvency and illiquidity” and urgent action was required.The TTFA stands to be suspended as a result of taking Fifa to the local courts, as Article 64 of the Fifa statutes prohibits member associations from taking internal disputes, or disputes affecting Leagues, members of leagues, clubs, members of clubs, players, officials and other association officials to ordinary courts of law.last_img read more

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