Dave Matthews Band Announces 2019 Summer Tour

first_imgDave Matthews Band has announced their plans for a 2019 North American summer tour.Dave Matthews Band’s headlining summer tour will kick off on April 30th in Pensacola, FL and includes two-night stands in Camden, NJ; Noblesville, IN; Elkhorn, WI; Saratoga Springs, NY; West Palm Beach, FL; and Denver, CO. The band will return to the Gorge Amphitheatre for its traditional three-night Labor Day run August 30th through September 1st, pushing its total number of performances at the scenic venue above 60. Dave Matthews Band will also perform at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival on May 4th as part of the festival’50th-anniversary celebration. The band will conclude its North American tour on September 22nd at the 2nd annual Sea Hear Now Festival in Asbury Park, NJ.An online ticket presale for members of the DMB Warehouse Fan Association will begin Thursday, January 24, 10am ET here. Citi card members will have access to purchase pre-sale tickets February 19th at 10am ET through February 21 at 10pm ET. For complete presale details, click here.Tickets will go on sale to the general public on Friday, February 22 at 10am local time. Every Ticket Purchase can be redeemed for an Unreleased Live Recording from DMB’s 2018 tour. For the complete list of tour dates, visit the band’s website.Dave Matthews 2019 Summer Tour4/30 Pensacola, FL Pensacola Bay Center5/01 Jacksonville, FL Veterans Memorial Arena5/04 New Orleans, LA New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival5/07 Pelham, AL Oak Mountain Amphitheatre5/11 Nashville, TN Bridgestone Arena5/14 Des Moines, IA Wells Fargo Center5/15 Maryland Heights, MO Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre5/17 The Woodlands, TX Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavilion5/18 Dallas, TX Dos Equis Pavilion6/14 Camden, NJ BB&T Pavilion6/15 Camden, NJ BB&T Pavilion6/19 Bethel, NY Bethel Woods Center for the Arts6/21 Mansfield, MA Xfinity Center6/22 Hartford, CT Xfinity Theatre6/28 Noblesville, IN Ruoff Home Mortgage Music Center6/29 Noblesville, IN Ruoff Home Mortgage Music Center7/02 Cincinnati, OH Riverbend Music Center7/03 Tinley Park, IL Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre7/05 Elkhorn, WI Alpine Valley Music Theatre7/06 Elkhorn, WI Alpine Valley Music Theatre7/09 Clarkston, MI DTE Energy Center7/10 Toronto, ON Budweiser Stage7/12 Saratoga Springs, NY Saratoga Performing Arts Center7/13 Saratoga Springs, NY Saratoga Performing Arts Center7/17 Wantagh, NY Northwell Health at Jones Beach Theater7/19 Charlotte, NC PNC Music Pavilion7/20 Bristow, VA Jiffy Lube Live7/23 Alpharetta, GA Ameris Bank Amphitheatre7/24 Tampa, FL MIDFLORIDA Credit Union Amphitheatre7/26 West Palm Beach, FL Coral Sky Amphitheatre7/27 West Palm Beach, FL Coral Sky Amphitheatre8/23 Greenwood Village, CO Fiddler’s Green Amphitheatre8/24 Greenwood Village, CO Fiddler’s Green Amphitheatre8/27 West Valley City, UT USANA Amphitheatre8/30 Quincy, WA Gorge Amphitheatre8/31 Quincy, WA Gorge Amphitheatre9/01 Quincy, WA Gorge Amphitheatre9/04 Ridgefield, WA Sunlight Supply Amphitheater9/06 Stateline, NV Lake Tahoe Outdoor Arena at Harveys9/07 Sacramento, CA Golden 1 Center9/13 Phoenix, AZ Ak-Chin Pavilion9/22 Asbury Park, NJ Sea.Hear.Now FestivalView All Tour Dateslast_img read more

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Rewarding innovation in inclusion

first_imgAn open-access online portal of anti-racism policy research publications.A pilot project to replace the prevalent anatomical representation of the human body (young, lean, white, and male) by collecting and generating anatomical images of all human forms.A map of inclusive symbols and spaces on campus.Those are just three of the proposals that will receive 2020‒21 grants from the Harvard Culture Lab Innovation Fund (HCLIF), which awards up to $15,000 to projects that expand welcome and support to all at Harvard. The fund is part of the Office for Diversity, Inclusion & Belonging, led by John Silvanus Wilson, senior adviser and strategist to President Larry Bacow.In a statement, Wilson called the wining projects “exceptional solutions to advance diversity and a culture of belonging on our campus.”“During these difficult times our hope is that these projects will contribute to creating a brighter future,” said Wilson. “These innovative solutions address the needs of some of our most vulnerable community members, including undocumented students, students with disabilities, LGBTQ community members, first generation/low-income students, racial minorities, and marginalized genders.”“During these difficult times our hope is that these projects will contribute to creating a brighter future,” said John Silvanus Wilson, senior adviser and strategist to President Larry Bacow. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard file photoWilson’s office works to foster a culture of inclusion and belonging to help the University become “a much better community.” The lab innovation fund is designed to invite and invest in creative ideas from the entire campus community. Students, faculty, staff, postdoctoral researchers and academic personnel are eligible to apply.“Harvard University recently made a choice to steadily and deliberately evolve our campus culture toward one that will help to ensure that everyone in our community thrives,” said Wilson. “We are pursuing what we call ‘sustainable inclusive excellence.’”Wilson said that the winning projects showed a “strong alignment with the goals from the 2018 report of the Presidential Task Force on Inclusion and Belonging” and “add recognizable value to our pursuit of sustainable inclusive excellence.The fund received 98 applications from Harvard Community members, and held two rounds of judging by review committees that included students, staff, and faculty.This year’s grant recipientsA Walk in My Shoes: Fostering Empathy for Gender Diversity Across Harvard. A project designed to disarm unconscious bias surrounding gender identity. Nicolas Freeman, Harvard Medical SchoolAddressing Bias in Medical Education through Inclusive Anatomical Representation. A pioneering pilot to replace the predominant anatomical representation of the human body by collecting and generating anatomical images of all human forms. Dana A Stearns, Director of Anatomy Education, Pathways Curriculum, HMSHarvard H.U.B. A plan to harness the power of technology and storytelling to connect undergraduate students to a myriad of campus resources. Nidhi Patel, Harvard CollegeMap of Inclusive Symbols and Spaces (MISS). An interactive web app that visualizes spaces around campus and gives information about their symbols (e.g., public art honoring social justice leaders) and names. Anisha Asundi, Research Fellow: Gender Specialist, Harvard Kennedy School (HKS)NextGen Initiative. A multiplatform initiative that aims to enhance the experience of all students who are the first in their families to pursue an undergraduate or graduate degree in the U.S. Amanda Sharick, Senior Program Manager, Graduate Commons Program, Central Administration (CADM)Race Research and Policy Portal. An online portal of evidence-based research and publications on policy, practice, and organizational change as they relate to racism, racial equity, and anti- racism. Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Professor of History, Race and Public Policy, HKSSySTEMatic: Expanding the Reach of Diversity in STEM Programming through Enhanced Mentorship Tech. A collaborative effort to implement mentoring software to aggregate opportunities and streamline efforts to strengthen the impact and expand the reach of STEM mentorship programs at Harvard. Deidre Schreiber, Senior IT Academy Training Program Manager, Central Administration/Harvard University Information Technology. The Women+ of Color Project @ Harvard. WOC+ aims to improve the pipeline of under-represented racial minority women who pursue graduate school in the physical sciences at Harvard. Lanell Williams, Ph.D. Candidate in Physics at Harvard University, NSF Graduate Research Fellow, Graduate School of Arts and SciencesUndocuVeritas. A support hub for undocumented/DACAmented students across all Harvard Schools and campuses. Denisse Rojas Marquez, Graduate Student, HKSUniversal Design for Inclusive Research Labs. This pilot aims to increase the number of undergraduate students with disabilities in research labs and increase the implementation of Universal Design principles in existing and new research environments. Shelby Acteson, Associate Director University Disability Resources, Central Administration/Harvard Human Resources In addition to the 2020‒21 grant recipients, three past winners received scaling grants (for high-impact social ventures) to expand and sustain their efforts: the Harvard Votes Challenge, a nonpartisan initiative to increase student voter registration and participation; the [Diversity, Equity, Inclusion and Belonging]  DEIB Personalized Learning Project, which provides resources for members of the University community to develop their DEIB skills; and Teachly, a web app that provides teachers with data-driven insights on their students’ classroom participation.Check dib.harvard.edu/hclif to view video pitches from the winning teams.last_img read more

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They’re inexpensive and they grow quickly.

first_imgWax myrtles (Myrica cerifera) grow rapidly in full sun.Tea olive (Osmanthus fragrantisima) or lusterleaf holly (Ilexlatifolia) are good choices for shaded hedgerows.“In general, these plants don’t suffer from the problems afflicting Leyland cypress as much,” Daly said. “But they still need to be given proper cultural conditions such as applying the correct amount of water.” Ten years ago, I planted Leyland cypress trees as a property border. A Christmas present from my parents, they were $3 a piece and stood all of six inches tall. When my University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agent told me to plant them 10 to 15 feet apart, I followed his advice even though I thought that was a lot of elbow room per plant.Today, my Leyland cypresses are more than 20 feet tall and are definitely doing their job buffering my view of the subdivision entrance across the street. I planted them 10 feet apart. I now wish I had opted for 15 feet.Inexpensive, fast-growing and tall“Leyland cypress trees are one of the most commonly planted trees in the landscape,” said Tim Daly, a UGA Extension agent in Gwinnett County. “They are popular because of their fast growth and their ability to provide a screen against traffic areas or neighbors.”Leyland cypress (X Cupressocyparis leylandii) is a hybridspecies that resulted from a cross between the Nootka false cypress (Chamaecyparis nootkantensis) and the Monterey cypress, (Cupressocyparis macrocarpa). It was discovered on a British estate in the late 1800s, Daly said.Poor site selection can create problems with Leyland cypress trees. “They grow into large trees, and in some parts of the world they can reach 100 feet tall and nearly 50 feet wide,” Daly said. “Think of the damage a tree that size could do to your house, fence or driveway only a few feet away.”Four feet taller each yearIt may be hard to imagine a small Leyland cypress growing into a 100-foot tall tree, but with proper care, it can and will happen, he said. Leyland cypresses grow about 4 feet per year in height and 2 to 3 feet in width.They require full sun, all day. “Shade will reduce their vigor, causing them to thin out and be more susceptible to diseases,” Daly said. “They also need plenty of air circulation inside the canopy to dry out the branches and leaves.”Planting too close to a fence, building or each other will prevent the interiors of the trees from drying out, he said, and could lead to fungal diseases.Well-drained soil a mustThe tree is best suited for fertile, well-drained soils. “The amount of soil water is one of the most critical factors in the growth of Leyland cypress,” Daly said. “Excess water will increase root-rotting fungal diseases, and too little water leads to stress and ultimately stem and leaf diseases.”To monitor the soil moisture, use a shovel to open a 4-inch-deep gap in the soil near the base of the trees. Feel the soil and test it for moisture. If it feels dry, water. If it feels wet, avoid watering.Diseases can take their toll on Leyland cypress trees. “Using chemical control is not feasible since the application of them is ineffective and will not have effect on control” he said. “Severely infected trees may have to be removed.”May be headed out, popularity wise,Disease pressure, improper planting and overuse may send Leyland cypress the way of plants like the Red Tip Photinia and Bradford pears, he said.Red tip photinias are small trees that were used extensively in the 1980s as a hedge. Most of the plants succumbed to Entomosporium fungal leaf spot disease. Bradford pears, although not afflicted with any serious diseases, have quick growing soft wood and crotches at an angle. This causes the branches to split off easily. Hollies are among the replacement candidatesSeveral alternatives to Leyland cypress are available. Here are Daly’s recommendations:Hollies like “Nellie R. Stevens” and “Emily Bruner.” These are best for borders in full sun.Arbovitaes (Thuja occidentalis), particularly the “GreenGiant” cultivar, which was selected as a 2007 Georgia Gold MedalPlant.last_img read more

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