RWB publishes profiles of “100 information heroes”

first_imgNot all are professional journalists. The Vietnamese citizen-journalist Le Ngoc Thanh, for example, is also a Catholic priest. Many, such as Lirio Abbate, a specialist in the Sicilian mafia, have focused on covering corruption and organized crime. This is the case with Peter John Jaban, a Malaysian radio programme host who spent years in self-exile on London, Serhiy Lechtchenko, an investigative journalist from Ukraine, and Assen Yordanov, a Bulgarian journalist who has been repeatedly threatened. Some work in democracies. They include Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras, US citizens who were responsible for revealing the mass electronic surveillance methods used by the US and British intelligence agencies. Others, such as the Iranian journalist Jila Bani Yaghoob, work under the most authoritarian regimes. The profiles also include activists like María Pía Matta, who has worked for nearly ten years for the World Association of Community Radio Broadcasters (AMARC), defending the freedom of community radio stations in Latin America. This obviously non-exhaustive list pays homage not only to the 100 famous and less well known people on it, but also to all the professional and non-professional journalists who constantly help to shed light on the world and cover every aspect of its reality. This initiative aims to show that the fight for freedom of information requires not only active support for the victims of abuses but also the promotion of those who can serve as models. =http://heroes.rsf.org/en/ RSF_en May 9, 2014 – Updated on January 25, 2016 RWB publishes profiles of “100 information heroes” “These ‘information heroes’ are a source of inspiration to all men and women who aspire to freedom. Without their determination and the determination of all those like them, it would be simply impossible to extend the domain of freedom.” Through their courageous work or activism, these “100 heroes” help to promote the freedom enshrined in article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the freedom to “to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers.” They put their ideals in the service of the common good. They serve as examples. Newscenter_img Organisation Courage is the common denominator. In Uzbekistan, the authorities had no compunction about torturing Muhammad Bekzhanov to extract a confession. In Eritrea, ranked last in the 2014 Reporters Without Borders press freedom index for the seventh year running, Dawit Isaac has languished in the dictator Issayas Afeworki’s jails for the past 13 years. Mazen Darwish, founder of the Syrian Centre for Media and Freedom of Expression and winner of the RWB press freedom prize in 2012, has been held for more than two years by the Assad regime. The list of “100 information heroes” comprises women and men of almost all ages (25 to 75) and 65 nations. The youngest, Oudom Tat, is Cambodian and the oldest, Muhammed Ziauddin, is Pakistani. Twenty-five of the heroes are from the Asia-Pacific region, 20 from the Middle East and North Africa, and eight from Europe. Iran, Russia, China, Eritrea, Azerbaijan, Mexico and Vietnam are each represented by at least three heroes. The lists includes such varied figures as Anabel Hernandez, the author of a bestseller on the collusion between Mexican politicians and organized crime, Ismail Saymaz, a Turkish journalist who has been prosecuted a score of times for his reporting, Hassan Ruvakuki, who was jailed for 15 months in Burundi for interviewing members of a rebel movement, and Gerard Ryle, the head of International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, who has contributed to the emergence of global investigative journalism. “World Press Freedom Day, which Reporters Without Borders helped to create, should be an occasion for paying tribute to the courage of the journalists and bloggers who constantly sacrifice their safety and sometimes their lives to their vocation,” said Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Christophe Deloire. Related documents 100 information heroesPDF – 2.83 MB List of profiles of “100 information heroes” Help by sharing this informationlast_img read more

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AN ALASKAN CHRISTMAS STORY

first_imgBy Susan Stamper BrownAmericans need a good dose of Christmas.As a nation, we are desperately lost, emotionally broken, spiritually deprived and headed for the same fate our “unadoptable” Alaskan husky dog was before my husband and I welcomed her into our home.It’s been four years since we adopted Kenai, a skeletal ball of nerves wrapped in cinnamon colored fur with spotty white “socks.”Obviously abused, she had zero trust in humans and no confidence in herself. Animal control officers almost deemed her unadoptable.She was literally scared of her shadow, fearing door entryways and basically everything inside our home, including us. She parked herself on our new chair in the living room corner. For three months she ate, drank and napped when she wasn’t staring at us and only left her perch when we’d take her outside to walk and potty.One cold and snowy winter night with near zero visibility, we feared this one-sided love affair had come to an end when she got away and bolted up and around our mountain. The more we called, chased and searched, the deeper into the woods and higher she climbed. Though we were forced to give up our search for the night, we refused to give up hope.Miraculously, she found her way back to our yard in the wee hours of an Alaska winter morning’s deep darkness. Despite our loving calls, she was afraid to come inside until we came up with a far-fetched idea to coax her inside walking our tiny terrier nicknamed “the rabbit killer” (for reasons not worthy of this column) on a leash nearby in hopes that she would follow.She did.Although we loved Kenai deeply and wanted desperately for her to come inside, we were at a complete loss on how to effectively communicate that message. Kenai needed an intermediary. A conciliator. A go-between. In our terrier, Kenai found a canine compatriot to communicate “There’s nothing to fear, come near, welcome home” in a way she could understand.Four years later, Kenai’s doing great. She’ll always be a little quirky, and full-blown crazy sometimes if something snaps in her head and sets her off. She’s slowly learning to do normal things like eat her food on the floor and play with toys if no one is watching.She loves to go for rides, begs for us to pet her, and even dares to bark now, with the cutest, most feminine and sweet bark you’ve ever heard.We added another sled dog to our pack, a well-balanced rescue that came with an amazing story all his own that I’ll share one day when the time is right. He’s rubbing off on Kenai in all the right ways. As for our terrier, well, she’s moved on from rabbits to shrews. I guess we should be grateful.With happy ears and a look of contentment on her face, Kenai’s resting in her now-worn out leather chair as I write.I think back to that winter morning years ago and the extremely loved shell of a dog curled up in that chair. I realize I learned something big about God’s love that day. An Alaskan Christmas story all my own.God sought us before we knew Him, reached out to us before we trusted Him and loved us before we knew how to love him back. He sent someone like us… an intermediary… Jesus, to communicate his message in a way we could understand. Through Jesus’ birth, eventual death, and resurrection, we come to understand (as much as is humanly possible) that God’s love for us is so deep and wide and high that we cannot escape his notice ‒ even when we try.“For unto us a child is born, unto us a son is given: and the government shall be on his shoulder: and his name shall be called Wonderful, Counselor, The mighty God, The everlasting Father, The Prince of Peace.” (Isaiah 9:6)FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Dubrovnik is finally reducing the arrival of cruisers. From next year, a maximum of two cruisers a day in Dubrovnik

first_imgDubrovnik has finally taken the right step in the context of reducing the excessive influx of tourists into the city from cruise ships, and in agreement with cruise companies has agreed that a maximum of two cruisers will sail into the most desirable cruise destination in the Mediterranean, bringing a maximum of 5000 visitors.Namely, after Dubrovnik Mayor Mato Franković started talks with the world’s largest cruise companies last year, gathered in the CLIA association, the problem of large crowds due to the simultaneous entry of up to seven cruisers from which 10 passengers would go on a tour of the city at once began. to be addressed. With a better schedule for the arrival of passenger ships, a maximum of two cruisers a day will come to Dubrovnik from next year.”Contracts with cruise companies have been signed for next year so we will have a maximum of two cruisers a day throughout the week, Monday through Sunday. Sometimes there will be only one, sometimes two will arrive at the same time or one in the morning and the other in the afternoon. We strived for that, and now we have achieved it ” Dubrovnik Mayor Mato Frankovic told Jutarnji list, and stressed that there is still a solution to traffic jams, which, he is convinced, is due to the liberalization of the taxi market, due to which more than a thousand taxi drivers worked in Dubrovnik this season.In addition to the agreement on the schedule of cruise arrivals, Dubrovnik also uses a system of cameras that count visitors when entering the historical ensemble, in order to avoid excessive crowds. In addition, through the project “Respect the City” is developing an application for direct communication with guests through which they will be advised the best time to visit the historic center, and by the end of next month will be presented a calendar through which you can see the estimated number of guests inside the ancient walls.”The key to the success of any destination is management, and we have done this by making contact with the world’s leading CLIA group, which brings together all the world’s key cruise operators. We have agreed on a better schedule for the arrival and departure of ships from cruises, which has significantly relieved the historic core and there are no more negative images in the media with congested entrances and blocked Stradun. The excellent coordination of the competent services was the most deserving in solving this problem ”Added Franković and pointed out that there are still days of the week when they do not have a single cruiser.By the end of this year, Dubrovnik will have 440 passenger ships with about 740 thousand passengers, or 3 percent fewer ships than last year, but 5 percent more passengers. And this year, the people of Dubrovnik welcomed the millionth passenger in the port of Gruž two days before last year.last_img read more

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ISP seeking help in solving tractor theft

first_imgGreensburg, IN—On Tuesday, September 17, troopers from the Indiana State Police-Versailles Post began investigating the theft of a large tractor and farm implements from southwest Decatur County.  The stolen items were recovered but the investigators are asking for the public’s help in locating the people responsible for the theft.Troopers were called to the location of County Road 600 South and County Road 1000 West in Decatur County at approximately 9:00 am on Tuesday after a Case 435 Quadtrac tractor was stolen from a field in that area that morning.  The tractor was connected to two farm implements at the time of the theft and those implements were also stolen.On Wednesday, September 18, after receiving a tip from the public, troopers located the tractor on County Road 420 West near Downeyville in rural Decatur County.  The two farm implements were located on Thursday, September 19, near Zenas in rural Jennings County with the assistance of an Indiana State Police helicopter.The Indiana State Police continues to investigate the theft and is asking the public’s help in locating the person or persons responsible for the theft.  Due to the size of the tractor, investigators believe the suspect may have had prior experience in operating similar equipment.Anyone with information about the theft is urged to call Master Trooper Rob Ewing, Indiana State Police-Versailles Post at (812)689-5000.last_img read more

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Bayern missing Mueller, Lewandowski for potential title-clincher

first_imgOne to watch: Emre CanThe Germany international scored the winner in last weekend’s tense 1-0 win over Hertha Berlin despite playing as part of a back three.The 26-year-old, who usually plays in midfield, has been a reliable figure for Dortmund since joining from Juventus in January.He has shown his versatility by adding steel to a sometimes vulnerable side while still providing an attacking threat, having also marked his debut in February with a stunning long-range strike against Bayer Leverkusen.Key stats39: Successive seasons in the Bundesliga for Werder Bremen.90: Bundesliga goals scored by Bayern this season. The club record is 101.12: Number of times Bayern have won the league and cup double.Fixtures (all times 1330 GMT unless stated)FridayHoffenheim v RB Leipzig (1830)SaturdayWolfsburg v Freiburg, Fortuna Duesseldorf v Borussia Dortmund, Hertha Berlin v Eintracht Frankfurt, Cologne v Union Berlin, Paderborn v Werder Bremen, Bayern Munich v Borussia Moenchengladbach (1630)SundayMainz v Augsburg, Schalke v Bayer Leverkusen (1600) Bayern Munich will be without Thomas Mueller (R) and Robert Lewandowski, who have contributed to 60 of Bayern’s 90 league goals this seasonBerlin, Germany | AFP |  Bayern Munich could secure an eighth straight Bundesliga title this weekend, but host Borussia Moenchengladbach on Saturday without suspended duo Thomas Mueller and Robert Lewandowski.Bayern will be confirmed champions with a win on Saturday if second-placed Borussia Dortmund lose at relegation-threatened Fortuna Duesseldorf earlier in the day.That scenario would give Hansi Flick’s side an unassailable 10-point lead with three games remaining.But Bayern are without Lewandowski, the league’s top scorer this season with 30 goals, and Mueller, who is one short of the Bundesliga record of 21 assists in a single campaign.“It’s annoying, but we can’t do anything about it,” said Bayern coach Flick.Thiago Alcantara is likely to replace Mueller, while winger Serge Gnabry could take Lewandowski’s place up front if he is fit after a back injury.Bayern proved they can score goals without Lewandowski by thumping Hoffenheim 6-0 in late February when the Polish striker was injured.They had a scare in Wednesday’s German Cup semi-final win over Eintracht Frankfurt, when Danny da Costa equalised for the visitors before Lewandowski sealed a 2-1 win with his 45th goal this season.Mueller admitted Bayern were “tired”, “worn out” and scrapped their way to victory in the first of three games in six days.But they are still in the running to repeat their 2013 treble having beaten Chelsea 3-0 away in their Champions League last-16 first leg before the competition was suspended in mid-March due to the coronavirus pandemic.Fourth-placed Gladbach pulled off a shock 2-1 victory at Borussia Park when the sides met last December.But Marco Rose’s side have been erratic of late, crushing Union Berlin 4-1 at home at the end of May before stumbling to defeat at Freiburg last weekend.Rose hopes to include Swiss forward Breel Embolo, with the 23-year-old fit after an ankle knock.– Bremen’s basement battle –At the foot of the table, fallen giants Werder Bremen face a crucial game at Paderborn in a battle of the bottom two.Florian Kohfeldt’s Bremen are six points from safety in 17th and three off the relegation play-off place following back-to-back home defeats.Bremen, who were in the Champions League a decade ago, have spent more seasons in the top flight than any other club, but are running out of time.“We know how much is riding on this game,” said American forward Josh Sargent. “This club has such a long history, and no one wants to let the team or the city down.” Share on: WhatsApplast_img read more

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Food Stamp Applications Up By 83 Percent in Monmouth County

first_img“SALLY” IS A single mother who had been working as a caseworker for a mental health counseling facility for adults, until she became a victim of downsizing and has spent the last two years unemployed. Things were tough for her while collecting unemployment insurance, but that has ended and Sally has had to do what she could to provide food for herself and her 6-year-old daughter. And that meant getting what has traditionally been called food stamps, public assistance to help her stretch her exceedingly meager budget.Sally is not the real name of the 40-year-old Neptune resident and college graduate, but she asked that her name be withheld. Sally’s story has become more common here in Monmouth County.“You just feel so helpless; sometimes it feels so hopeless,” she said recently.Kathleen Weir, the deputy director of the Monmouth County Division of Social Services, shared the startling news that her offices has seen an 83 percent increase since Oct. 2009 in active case loads for the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program, or SNAP, previously known as food stamps, a federally funded public assistance program. According to Weir the current number of active cases as of last month stands at 16,585. By active case, Weir explained that the number of those applying has remained fairly consistent since 2009, but this indicates more are meeting the eligibility requirements.On the state level, enrollment has increased by more than 24 percent, by about 150,000 individuals, from March 2010 to March 2011, according to information provided by Nicole Brossoie, assistant commissioner of public affairs for the New Jersey Department of Human Services.During that same time period, according to Brossoie, the number of households on the program grew by a little more than 25 percent or about 80,000 additional homes.When money gets tight, when people try to live on less as they lose their jobs or find themselves in difficult straits, they will make changes, cut expenses. But “Food is not a discretionary expense. You need it to live,” this week said Arti Sinha, a Monmouth County human services specialist.Sinha said the makeup of the clients has been changing in these last few economically difficult years. “I’ve seen more retirees then I did in the past,” as those on fixed incomes try to address the rising cost of groceries. “I’m seeing younger families who in the past were able to make it,” but now can’t, she said.“I had people in the past say, ‘There are people who need it more than me. I’m not going to apply. But now I need it,’” Sinha said of her experiences. “That is the phrase I keep hearing over and over, that people are coming because they must, it’s imperative.”“It’s very said.”There has also been a change in some of the geography. There are traditional pockets within the county, most of them in the eastern portion, where clients would live. Now, though, “We’ve seen a lot of clients that we would never have seen in the past,” from some of the western and affluent communities, such as Manalapan and Marlboro, Allentown, Millstone, she said.“We’ve definitely seen quite an influx,” she said.A family of four would qualify for SNAP if their gross income level doesn’t exceed $3,447 per month. And families can include children up to age 22. “If you live together and eat together you are considered part of the same household,” according to Sinha. There are other deductions available for housing, utilities and medical expenses. At that income level a family would be eligible for $668 a month from the program for food. And “the bigger the household size, the higher the income threshold,” she said.But for some that allowance isn’t enough to carry them through the month, forcing them to go to food pantries.One woman told Sinha how she buys mac and cheese and frozen hot dogs for her three young children. “’I buy things based on how long I can make them last,’” she told Sinha.“You’re buying based on that it’s filling, rather than maybe nutritional, and you look for what’s on sale,” Sinha said, relating her clients’ experience.Sinha and her colleagues have seen their caseloads triple, which has its impact on them as well. “Everyone’s story is so compelling,” and she and her co-workers worry about suffering from compassion fatigue. “You wake up at 3 o’clock [a.m.] thinking about finishing a case,” she said.“I truly feel for families with children and the elderly,” Sinha said. “They are the most vulnerable of our population.”Sally in her work sometimes would have to assist other vulnerable populations, those emotionally and mentally challenged, to maneuver the system to get them benefits, never thinking she would be in a similar situation she said.“I’ve heard a lot of complaints,” from those that had been her clients. Some lived in single room occupancy hotels, under housing vouchers. But those facilities usually don’t allow hot plates or refrigerators, and the food program doesn’t allow clients to purchase prepared foods, making it difficult for them, she said.SNAP also doesn’t cover paper products, which can be another problem for people, Sally said.Sally has been surviving on intermittent work in her field and some help from her family. But looking for work has been “horrible” and she and her daughter will have to move in with her parents.For now the food stamps provide a necessary lifeline, but “It’s limited, it’s once a month and it’s never enough,” she said.last_img read more

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