Austrian platform law: Government should avoid errors made with NetzDG

first_imgAvoid repeating errors with NetzDG and its updatesReporters Without Borders takes a positive view of the introduction of new transparency obligations for companies with regard to their handling of user reports. Science, politics and civil society are dependent on comparable and meaningful data from companies. The growing influence of AI-controlled content moderation must also be transparently traceable. Facebook and YouTube in particular are increasingly relying on the automated detection of illegal content and are accepting a possible increase in error rates. RSF calls for a fully transparent investigation after mine kills two journalists in Azerbaijan June 7, 2021 Find out more AustriaFranceGermanyEurope – Central Asia Online freedoms InternetFreedom of expression News RSF_en “We’ll hold Ilham Aliyev personally responsible if anything happens to this blogger in France” RSF says News Organisation September 4, 2020 Austrian platform law: Government should avoid errors made with NetzDG The package also includes a new platform responsibility for large online forums (excluding encyclopedias such as Wikipedia, trade portals and national media forums). In a fast-track procedure, those affected can obtain the deletion of insulting and reputation-damaging forum contributions. In future, platforms with more than 100,000 users and an annual turnover of more than 500,000 euros will have to provide a registration form to report criminal hate speech. The operators of the sites are then obliged to check reported violations within 24 hours (or seven days in ambiguous cases) and, if the law applies, to block them if necessary. June 8, 2021 Find out more News Receive email alerts AustriaFranceGermanyEurope – Central Asia Online freedoms InternetFreedom of expression Worry about “Overblocking”Reporters Without Borders welcomes the fact that the Austrian government has anticipated central points of criticism of the German NetzDG with regard to the protection of freedom of opinion and freedom of the press. To protect against possible “over-blocking”, i.e. platforms carrying out too many and intransparent deletions due to inadequate specifications, the users concerned have a right to appeal. This is still being negotiated in Germany. In addition, those affected should be able to contact an independent complaints office. RSF has been emphasizing for some time now the necessity of not leaving the decision-making authority over the legality of content to companies alone. Users must be able to turn to independent bodies and, in the final instance, to appeal to the courts, so that fundamental freedoms are preserved in the digital public sphere. Denis Charlet / AFP “It is crucial that platforms will no longer be able to delete contributions without explanation. The right to freedom of information must be safeguarded,” said Rubina Möhring. The existing Austrian Communications Platforms Act (KoPl-G) ultimately creates one-sided financial incentives for companies to delete contributions once too often in cases of doubt, because only systematic misconduct in removing illegal content leads to substantial fines, but not the deletion of contributions covered by the freedom of opinion. Austria is now ranked 18th in the World Press Freedom Index. Reporters Without Borders warns against a repetition of the mistakes made by the German federal government in the new Austrian bill to combat hate speech in social media and online platforms, which was presented yesterday in Vienna. No waiting for BrusselsThe European Commission published the draft already on Wednesday 2 September after the obligatory notification by the Austrian government. Work is also currently underway at European level on a fundamental reform of Internet regulation in the form of the Digital Services Act, which is intended to create a uniform set of rules for online platforms. However, it could take years before it is adopted and implemented in the member states. It remains to be seen how the European Commission will react to the renewed national solo effort. In the case of the French law, the Commission had sharply criticized the fragmentation of the digital single market. It now has up to three months to evaluate the national draft that has been presented. Respect judicial independence in cases of two leading journalists in Serbia and Montenegro, RSF says Follow the news on Europe – Central Asia Following the controversial German Network Enforcement Act (NetzDG) and the “Loi Avia” in France, which was declared unconstitutional in June, it is the next attempt by an EU member state to force especially powerful platforms such as Facebook and Twitter to quickly delete illegal content. The key point of the package is that hate speech will be easier to punish in the future and affected users will be able to defend themselves quickly and with low thresholds. June 4, 2021 Find out more Help by sharing this information to go further News “We welcome the initiative’s objective of better protecting people in the digital space from hate speech. Media professionals are particularly exposed to this phenomenon. At the same time, despite some positive adjustments, the law pursues similarly problematic approaches as those already adopted in France and Germany and could also lead to restrictions on freedom of expression and freedom of the press in these countries,” says Rubina Möhring, President of Reporters without Borders (RSF) Austria.  International solution neededIn the view of Reporters Without Borders, an international set of rules that promotes democratic debate and diversity on the internet, while emphasizing the protection of information and press freedom, would be urgently needed to counteract the increasing censorship efforts in the digital space, as RSF is currently observing in Russia and Turkey, among other countries. In the last two years, numerous states issued extensive Internet laws with reference to the German NetzDG, partly with devastating consequences for the liberty of the press. In July, for example, the Turkish government used the German law as an excuse to increase pressure on international platforms, to grant state removal orders and to store user data locally to facilitate state access to it. Significant data protection issues remain, however, with regard to the obligation to store user data for better prosecution of illegal contributions. Corresponding proposals within the framework of the drafting of the German law to combat right-wing extremism and hate crime went in some cases much further than necessary and earned criticism from data protection activists and Reporters Without Borders. The Austrian government should therefore draw conclusions from the German debate and take up constructive suggestions, for example from the Commissioner for Data Protection and Freedom of Information.last_img read more

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Army cadets compete for German badge in military proficiency

first_imgNotre Dame’s Army ROTC program prepares cadets for American military life, but this weekend members of the Fightin’ Irish Battalion will compete for German recognition. Four cadets will compete for the German Armed Forces Badge for Military Proficiency, awarded by the German Army, known as the Bundeswehr. Senior Josh Sandler, will compete for the award along with Holy Cross sophomore triplets Randy Jozwiak, Matt Jozwiak and Allen Jozwiak. The group will participate this weekend in Indianapolis, with Sandler serving as the team leader. Each will vie for his own badge individually. Sandler said though the German army gives the award, it is for American participants. “The German Armed Forces Badge is an award for military proficiency from the German army, authorized to be awarded to and worn by Americans,” he said. The competition takes place over two and a half days and is comprised of eight separate individual events ­— a 200-meter swim, a 100-meter sprint, a five-kilometer run, a long jump, a shot put competition, a first aid test, a 9 mm pistol shoot and a march carrying a 33-pound pack called a “ruck march.” Competitors have to meet or exceed a standard of performance in each event. These standards vary for different age brackets and are based on gender. Further, some events are referred to as “go, no go” contests, and others determine whether a competitor receives a gold, silver or bronze badge, Matt Jozwiak said. “Go, no go” means a competitor will no longer continue in the competition if they fail to meet an event’s standards. Jozwiak said an example of a “go, no go” event is the long jump, where competitors are disqualified if they do not jump at least 4.5 meters. Other events in this category are the 200-meter swim, the 100-meter sprint, the five-kilometer run and the shot put. Jozwiak said the first-aid test is similar to the “go, no go” physical event, as competitors must pass in order to receive a badge. The shooting competition and the “ruck march” determine the type of badge a competitor is eligible to receive, Jozwiak said. “There is a shooting competition with a 9 mm pistol. You have five chances to hit a target 25 meters away,” he said. “Three out of five is the minimum to still be eligible for a badge. If you hit the target five times you are eligible for gold, four times you are eligible for silver, and three times you are eligible for bronze.” The “ruck march” is the final competition and determines what type of badge an individual earns, Jozwiak said. Different distances and time standards for the march are required for different types of badges. Sandler said he wanted to compete for the German Armed Forces badge for the prestige. “In the Army, you wear your resume on your chest,” he said. “This is a shiny new bullet point.” Jozwiak said he is competing for the badge because he has never participated in a similar experience. “I really just wanted to do it because I’ve never done anything like the track-and-field events before,” he said. “The experience itself is what I’m looking forward to. I also want to better myself physically.” Sandler said all of the Notre Dame ROTC cadets have a chance at a badge this weekend. “It’s not a participation ribbon, but if we continue to put the work in every one of us is capable of coming home with some hardware,” he said. Jozwiak said he is confident at least one of the four teammates will come home victorious. “Personally, I don’t know how I will do,” he said. “I think as a team we’ll come back with some badges, at least one gold.”last_img read more

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Four AI applications credit unions must implement now

first_img 10SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr While a few industry leaders do get it, many discussions around artificial intelligence (AI) in banking shows that the industry at large still views AI in very abstract terms. While banks seem to be thinking about AI more and more, there still seems to be a consistent struggle in understanding when or where to apply this analytic tool. This struggle often leads to hesitation to actually testing and implementing the benefits of AI at financial institutions.Theory and speculation have surrounded AI for decades, from the idea that machines will eventually “take over the world,” to now seeing early applications via self-driving vehicles and virtual personal assistants. Contrary to what many people believe, AI replacing professionals in the banking industry anytime soon is unlikely. Its real value is in augmentation – to replicate human-like behaviors or tasks, not people at a more rapid rate, leading to new advancements and discoveries.Developments around AI could not have come at a better time. Advanced analytics is growing rapidly, which inherently benefits AI, though business intelligence doesn’t go far enough. Banks have had data for a while, and have reported on that data for years, but with today’s data being so significant in size, much of it is going unused. Additionally, if financial institutions have made the substantial investment to normalize the data so it can be used, it’s often cumbersome to even get it into a format that’s valuable to the business. continue reading »last_img read more

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Hotel Marjan is finally ready for sale or official takeover of Adris

first_imgAfter 11 long years, the light is finally visible at the end of the tunnel around the future of the Marjan Hotel in Split. Namely, the bankruptcy proceedings at the Commercial Court in Split against the bankruptcy debtor “Adriatic” dd in bankruptcy were completed by issuing a conclusion on the sale, reports Free Dalmatia. By 2021, an additional two billion kuna will be invested in the tourist part of the Group, which will bring 95 percent of hotel capacities to the highest level of supply, announced Adris at the end of last year. After the opening of the luxury hotel Park in Rovinj, investments will follow in Split, of course if everything goes according to plan around the hotel Marjan, and in Zagreb and Dubrovnik in hotels HUP Zagreb, which Adris bought from Andjelko Leka last year. Thus, Fina will sell an electronic public auction of a hotel of 5679 square meters, a substation, a parking lot, three yards and stairs, all together almost 12 square meters. According to the accepted estimate, the price was set at HRK 432 million including VAT. ADRIS WILL INVEST TWO BILLION HRK IN THE TOURIST PART OF THE GROUP BY 2021 Željko Kerum bought the Marjan Hotel in 2005 through a tender. He paid 170 million kuna, three times more than the requested 57 million kuna. Less than four years later, a contract was signed with the Hilton, and Kerum became mayor a few months later. The works on “Marjan” were soon interrupted, and in 2015 everything ended with the bankruptcy of the company “Adriatic.center_img RELATED NEWS: It would be a real “miracle” if Adris did not buy Hotel Marjan and thus not become a 100% owner of this extremely valuable property. Namely, in December 2017, Adria resort, a company within the Adris group, concluded an Agreement on the purchase and sale of all receivables with associated mortgages on real estate owned by the bankrupt company Adriatic dd from Split. If another investor interested in the Marjan hotel appears, then he should additionally buy receivables from Adris, which is very unlikely. THE MOST LUXURIOUS HOTEL ON THE ADRIATIC OPENED, GRAND PARK HOTEL last_img read more

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