Chester Bennington Of Linkin Park Has Died

first_imgIt is with heavy hearts that we report that Linkin Park lead singer Chester Bennington died today at the age of 41. Law enforcement officials stated that his death was ruled a suicide by hanging. His body was discovered in a private residence in Palos Verdes Estates, CA earlier this morning. Chester was currently married, and had 6 children from two marriages. The singer had spoken publicly about his personal demons, including years of struggling with drug and alcohol abuse.Earlier this year, when Chris Cornell committed suicide, Chester and the rest of Linkin Park paid tribute to their fallen friend with a heartfelt rendition of their track “One More Light” on Jimmy Kimmel Live. He also sang at Cornell’s funeral. Chris would have celebrated his 53rd birthday today. You can watch Chester’s haunting tribute to Cornell below:Linkin Park first achieved widespread success with their 2000 debut album Hybrid Theory, which was certified Diamond by the RIAA in 2005, selling more than 10 million copies largely thanks to the interplay between Bennington’s visceral, seething-yet-beautiful nu metal vocals and MC Mike Shinoda‘s hip hop verses. In a 2003 countdown special, MTV2 named Linkin Park the sixth-greatest band of the music video era. The band also made notable strides in crossing genres within popular music, famously collaborating with hip-hop superstar Jay Z for their 2004 mashup album Collision Course, as well as several other artists from various genres on subsequent remix albums Reanimation and Recharge.The band’s seventh original studio album, One More Light, was released this May, and they are currently in the midst of a 54-date world tour featuring opening acts like Sum 41, Snoop Dogg, Wu Tang Clan, and more. No announcement has been made yet regarding the upcoming scheduled shows, though it’s hard to imagine the band performing without Bennington’s distinctively entrancing vocals.You can watch the classic music videos for the two biggest hits from Linkin Park’s debut album, “Crawling” and “In The End,” both of which earned notably extended stints atop the TRL Top Ten video countdown, the most prestigious barometer for music videos throughout the late 90’s and early 00’s:“In The End”“Crawling”Our thought are with Bennington’s family and friends. Rest easy, Chester.[h/t – TMZ]last_img read more

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Imported foods

first_imgIf one of your New Year’s resolutions is to eat only American-grown food, mark apple juice, cauliflower, garlic and limes off your grocery list. A University of Georgia food scientist says the majority of these foods are imported from other countries.“In 2006, about 15 percent of the food consumed in the U.S. was imported,” said Faith Critzer, a researcher with the UGA Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Ga. “And almost 44 percent of the fruit and 16 percent of the vegetable supply were imported to the U.S. in 2005.”A variety are importedMost apple juice, frozen cauliflower, garlic and limes consumed in the U.S. are imported, Critzer said. The apple juice and garlic come from China. The cauliflower and limes are courtesy of Mexico. In 2008, 80 percent of fresh artichokes, 79.9 percent of fresh asparagus and 52.9 percent of fresh cucumbers in U.S. stores were imported. Population growth and consumer demand for fresh produce year-round are driving forces the increase in imports, Critzer said.Nuts and seafood, tooAlmost half of all shelled nuts consumed by Americans are imported, according to a 2005 report by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The major countries exporting nuts to the U.S. are Vietnam, India, Mexico, Brazil and China. And 80 percent of the seafood consumed in the U.S. is imported.Critzer says the safety of these imported foods will be a growing concern in the future. The problem isn’t where the food comes from, but how it’s grown or processed before it reaches American soil and, ultimately, American dinner tables.According to a 2009 Food Marketing Institute report, three-quarters of American shoppers surveyed are either “somewhat comfortable” or “not too comfortable” with foods grown outside the U.S.Supply chains stretch overseasThe influx of imported food didn’t happen over night, said Jim Daniels, an agricultural economist with the UGA Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development. “Over the 1900s, America’s food systems underwent dramatic changes and evolved into the very highly specialized and complex businesses that exist today,” Daniels said.These changes have resulted in longer supply chains that often stretch past the borders of the U.S., Daniels said.For example, a double-patty hamburger with cheese and sauce sold by a well-known national fast food chain has over 150 ingredients. Half of those ingredients could originate from outside the U.S., he said. “Our food now comes from all corners of the globe, passes through many more hands and reaches our tables in many more forms than ever before,” Daniel said. “Likewise, the products that we grow and manufacture in Georgia are distributed all over the country and world and may end up as ingredients in literally tens of thousands of other products.”Improved detection methods neededWhat can concerned Americans do?Michael Doyle, head of the UGA Center for Food Safety, says the solution lies in the hands of food producers, processors and regulatory agencies like the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.”Solutions to today’s food safety issues will not come easy,” Doyle said. “They will require a major research commitment to developing state-of-the-art science methods to detect, control and eliminate harmful substances in foods.”The food industry, whether it be growers, manufacturers or distributors, is responsible for providing safe foods,” he said. “And regulatory agencies need more rapid and robust sampling and detection methods to verify that foods, especially those that are imported, are safe from harmful microbes and chemicals.”For now, UGA experts encourage consumers to wash produce thoroughly, cook meats to appropriate temperatures and keep kitchen utensils and countertops clean. For more tips on keeping your family safe from foodborne illness, see the Web site www.fcs.uga.edu/fdn/. Or, call your local UGA Cooperative Extension office at 1-800-ASK-UGA1.last_img read more

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CARIFTA team’s training programme to get underway shortly

first_imgWITH Guyana’s team to next month’s Flow CARIFTA Games being named, the Athletics Association of Guyana (AAG) president Aubrey Hutson is awaiting a proposal from the coaching panel to put together a training programme for the 12 representing athletes.According to Hutson the coaches will give an exact outline of what the plan will include and submit it within the next few days.Daniel Williams“That decision is going to be made by the coaching panel that is going with the team, and the other coaches that we have certified.“They are scheduled for a meeting by the end of the week and they are going to put together a proposal on how we will handle the team between now and their departure.” Hutson said.Following the conclusion of the CARIFTA qualifying period last Sunday, 12 athletes have attained qualifying marks in various events at the international event, and all will be afforded the opportunity to go.The team consists of one athlete in each of the four categories at the Games. In the Youth (Under-18) category Linden’s Chantoba Bright will lead the Girls’ side which also includes sprinters Kenisha Phillips and Onasha Rogers, as well as distance runner Claudrice McKoy.The Boys’ youth category will see the return of Daniel Williams, while this year Christianburg’s Tremaine Browne and Tarique Boyle also made the cut.The Boys’ Junior (Under-20) category has Compton Caesar, Anfernee Headecker, Samuel Lynch, and Matthew McKenzie. Overseas-based Natricia Hooper is the only junior female athlete.Natricia HooperThe team is comprised of fairly seasoned athletes, including CARIFTA silver medallists Bright and Hooper, and Williams, who last year finished second in the Boys’ Under-18 400m but was later disqualified after stepping out of his lane. Over 60% of the team attended the Games last year.The team will be accompanied by Linden coaches Johnny Gravesande and Moses Pantlitz, and team manager Yvonne October. The athletes come from four clubs across Guyana, while Hooper is the only overseas-based athlete on the team. Just over 40% of the team’s athletes are from Linden, with the remainder coming exclusively from Georgetown clubs.Apart from Christianburg the clubs represented are Upper Demerara, the Guyana Defence Force, and Running Brave.Compton CaesarHutson said some amount of effort was made to have athletes from outside of Georgetown included at the meets over the past few weeks since the trials began in February.“We’ve been offering passage assistance to persons coming down. We did get a lot of Berbice athletes but for me I was more looking for the ones further up in the Skeldon, Albion areas.“We did not get people coming down from Corentyne. We were trying to find out what was going on with Delroy Leitch, but he subsequently joined the army and is currently involved in military training,” Hutson said.“Ricky Williams (from District Nine) did come; He came to two of the three trials. Just last weekend we had Joshua Williams from District One, where we gave some financial assistance for him to be here. The region would have taken care of his air fare; we did contributions to his meal and accommodation.”Chantoba BrightHutson, however, did admit that as it pertains to reaching out to athletes in the far-off areas more needs to be done by the AAG.“As it relates to far-flung areas, I don’t think we would have done enough work getting athletes constantly involved in athletics even after school nationals.“We utilised a lot of energies trying to get Corentyne active. We have no club existing in that area. We were asking the folks in New Amsterdam to reach out to them. (However) the AAG really needs to reach out further and do a little more work especially in that area.” Hutson concluded.last_img read more

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