News story: Academy Leeds workshop: Setting and Measuring Outcomes

first_img PDF, 194KB, 1 page 14 March, 2019featuringAndreea Anastasiu │ Policy and Engagement Officer│ Government Outcomes LabandNeil Stanworth │ Founding Director │ ATQ Consultants and GO Lab Fellow of PracticePlease see the attached fkyer for further information and how to register your interest in attending. If you use assistive technology (such as a screen reader) and need aversion of this document in a more accessible format, please email [email protected] tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use. Academy Leeds workshop: Setting and Measuring Outcomes (flyer)center_img Request an accessible format. This file may not be suitable for users of assistive technology.last_img

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Watch Holly Bowling Break Down Her Transcription Of Phish’s ‘It’s Ice’ For Piano

first_imgPianist Holly Bowling has taken the music of Phish to new heights, transcribing it for piano and performing these stripped-down versions for fans everywhere. Bowling turned heads with her performance of the full “Tahoe Tweezer,” and continues to impress with her unique interpretations of Phish’s improvisations.Of course, Phish’s music isn’t all improvised, and one of the more rigorous compositions by the band is their song “It’s Ice.” Bowling just released an intriguing video for Phish phans, where she talks about the transcription process and performs!Watch Bowling’s new video, streaming below.last_img

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Greensky Bluegrass Adds Nine New Dates To 2019 Summer Tour Schedule

first_imgPopular jamgrass outfit Greensky Bluegrass has announced a new batch of additions to their 2019 summer tour schedule.On Monday, the band added nine new shows to their growing summer tour, adding to last week’s announcement of scheduled shows in Portland, OR; Seattle, WA; and New York, NY. The new batch of dates include a pair of shows with support from Lil Smokies at the Red Butte Garden in Salt Lake City, UT on June 27th, and the KettleHouse Amphitheater in Missoula, MT the following evening on June 28th.The band will also make stops throughout the month of July and into August at venues including The Norva in Norfolk, VA (7/17); Greenfield Lake Amphitheatre in Wilmington, NC (7/18); Koka Booth Amphitheatre in Cary, NC (7/19); Charlotte Metro Credit Union Amphitheatre in Charlotte, NC (7/20); Salvage Station in Asheville, NC (7/21); MECU Pavilion in Baltimore, MD (8/1); and the Jay Peak Resort in Jay, VT (8/3).Related: Cathead Jam Announces 2019 Lineup: The Revivalists, Umphrey’s McGee, Greensky Bluegrass, MoreThe newly-added dates join previously-announced appearances at major festivals across the country including the band’s own Camp Greensky, Telluride Bluegrass Festival, High Sierra Music Festival, 4848 Festival, The Peach Music Festival, and more. Greensky Bluegrass is also scheduled to head to Red Rocks Amphitheatre just outside of Denver, CO for a three-night run of shows come September.Pre-sale tickets for the new dates are available now via the band’s tour page on their website. General on-sale for the added summer performances will begin this Friday, March 8th, with exception of the June 27th Salt Lake City concert, which begins on-sale on April 29th.Greensky Bluegrass Summer Tour DatesNewly added dates boldedJune 21 – Telluride Bluegrass Festival – Telluride, COJune 27 – Red Butte Garden – Salt Lake City, UT*June 28 – KettleHouse Amphitheater – Missoula, MT*June 29 – Oregon Zoo Amphitheater – Portland, ORJune 30 – Woodland Park Zoo Amphitheater – Seattle, WAJuly 7 – High Sierra Music Festival – Quincy, CAJuly 12–13 – 4848 Festival – Snowshoe, WVJuly 17 – The NorVA – Norfolk, VAJuly 18 – Greenfield Lake Amphitheater – Wilmington, NCJuly 19 – Koka Booth Amphitheatre – Cary, NCJuly 20 – Charlotte Metro Credit Union Amphitheatre – Charlotte, NCJuly 21 – Salvage Station – Asheville, NCJuly 27 – The Peach Music Festival – Scranton, PAAugust 1 – MECU Pavilion – Baltimore, MDAugust 2 – The Rooftop at Pier 17 – New York, NYAugust 3 – Jay Peak Resort – Jay, VT* w/ The Lil SmokiesView New 2019 Tour Dateslast_img read more

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The quantum of cruelty

first_imgFive years after the review was ordered, the U.S. Senate Intelligence Committee voted earlier this month to release the executive summary from a 6,300-page report that details for the first time the Central Intelligence Agency’s detention and interrogation programs and practices since the 9/11 terrorist attacks.The still-classified report is expected to cast a new and harsh light on the CIA’s use of brutal and inhumane techniques to elicit intelligence from suspected terrorist detainees. It also is expected to assert that the CIA misled the committee about the nature of its clandestine activities, according to recent public comments by some committee members. President Obama, who shut down the CIA’s detainee program and formally banned torture shortly after taking office in 2009, has pledged to declassify the report’s summary once the CIA has completed its review of the document, a process that could take months.Alberto Mora knows all too well how the United States took some actions that violated the Geneva Conventions in the name of fighting terrorism. As the senior civilian lawyer in the Department of the U.S. Navy during much of the George W. Bush administration, he saw firsthand the legal maneuvering that took place to justify the cruel and degrading treatment of detainees held in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, who were suspected of being members of al-Qaida and other terrorist groups.Mora was an early and vocal critic of the Bush administration’s support for aggressive interrogation by the military’s Joint Task Force. In a 22-page memo written in 2004 in response to an investigation into abuse at the Abu Ghraib prison, Mora strongly objected to Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld’s authorization of abusive physical and psychological tactics such as waterboarding, a practice long held to be illegal under U.S. and international law. Mora also helped lead an effort from within the Pentagon to put a stop to it. The improper legal basis for granting such authority is reported to be among the committee’s most explosive conclusions.Currently a fellow at the Advanced Leadership Initiative (ALI) at Harvard University, Mora, 62, says releasing the report is a vital first step in informing the public about actions undertaken by the U.S. government during the war on terror, an area that’s been largely shrouded in secrecy.“This really should clarify the actual practices used, the frequency, the severity, their impact on the subjects of the interrogation, and the use of that information in an intelligence context and a net assessment as to whether or not it helped make us safer,” he said. “All of this greater factual understanding is absolutely critical if we’re going to have the ability to truly assess the cost, consequences, benefits and negatives of all of this.”This inquiry “is something I tried to get the Pentagon to do, the joint staff to do. It was one of the last things I did before I left the Pentagon,” said Mora, who retired from the government in 2006. “But I was told they were ordered not to pursue this line of inquiry” because “it would have been embarrassing to the president, embarrassing to the administration.”Legalizing what had been criminalMora, the son of a Harvard-trained physician from Cuba and a Hungarian mother, spent time as a child in pre-Castro Cuba. A conservative who served as a political appointee during the presidencies of both Bushes, he said understanding what went on is important not as a partisan critique of an administration’s policy decisions, but as “an issue of first principles.”“It’s about values, laws, the character of our country, the foreign policy we’ll pursue, the kind of world we’re seeking to create and support, how we conduct military operations and their effectiveness. All these things are tied into how we treat detainees and what the values are that we live up to or don’t live up to,” he said.Critics of the report, which was assembled by the committee’s Democratic members, say it paints an inaccurate and incomplete picture of the CIA’s actions. Former Vice President Dick Cheney, widely viewed as the driver behind the use of so-called “enhanced interrogation,” last month denied that such tactics were war crimes and insisted that he would authorize their use again because they yielded valuable information.“The proponents of this have said it was legal, necessary, and effective,” said Mora, who rejects the term “enhanced interrogation.” “But we know they redefined the whole law on torture; they sought to legalize what had been criminal acts before. The argument continues to be made that waterboarding, as applied by us, was not torture. Yet, for centuries, it’s been regarded as torture. Every country regards it as torture.“I say ‘torture’ because it’s clear that some of it was torture. If we apply the standard legal criteria for this, we know that, at a minimum, all of it was cruel and inhuman and degrading treatment, and some of it crossed the threshold into torture. So part of it is calling things by their proper names, which is so important …”Under the direction of Gen. Michael Hayden, who led the National Security Agency from 1999 to 2005 and the CIA from 2006 to 2008, officials pushed ahead with tough interrogations even after the military had abandoned the practice.“He wanted people to have ‘chalk on their cleats,’” Mora said. “He wanted them to go to the very boundary of what was lawful in applying interrogation. The danger with that is if you go out of bounds, you by definition cross into the realm of criminal activity.”Not coming to gripsMora will spend his fellowship year, with support from the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at Harvard Kennedy School, studying and measuring the costs and consequences of such U.S.-sanctioned tactics.Some costs are already known: The Joint Chiefs of Staff concluded that images of detainee cruelty in Abu Ghraib and Guantanamo Bay gave jihadists and other anti-American groups their most effective recruiting tool and constitute the top two identifiable causes of U.S. combat deaths, said Mora.“It gives them the moral high ground. And combat, like a lot of political activity, is fought using the language of justice and of rights,” he said. “When we engage in waterboarding, when we engage in brutality, when we dismantle the human right of freedom from cruelty, then we lose the advantage, we lose the clarity of contrast between ourselves and al-Qaida. And we certainly damaged relationships with our traditional allies.“The fact that almost half the American public believes that torture is permissible if it could make us safer, that’s an indication of the country not coming to grips with this kind of issue,” he added.Despite his now-public break with the Bush administration, Mora says he hasn’t paid a price for his outspokenness or efforts.“If anything, I think my reputation has been enhanced, and I’ve benefited from doing what I did and from my involvement in this activity,” he said. “I was never a sole actor in this matter. I always took comfort in every single moment from the fact that every military lawyer, every [judge advocate general] I spoke with … always believed about these things exactly as I did … [that] this was contrary to Geneva, contrary to American ethics and values, counterproductive in the battlefield, an abomination.”After Rumsfeld halted abusive interrogation in Guantanamo following intervention by Mora and others, there was a feeling of triumph, albeit fleeting.“What I didn’t realize at the time, didn’t realize it until after Abu Ghraib, was the fact that the same authority and even worse had been given to the CIA and a lot of the interrogation activity shifted to CIA,” away from the military, said Mora. “What we had done at the Pentagon clearly did not affect CIA authorities, clearly did not affect White House thinking on the issue, Department of Justice thinking on these matters. So it was a partial victory.”While the problem of prisoner abuse is “much better” now than it was in 2002, he says, there is a connection between the government’s relaxed stance on torture and the unchecked surveillance of civilians by the National Security Agency, one rooted in the emotions stirred by 9/11.“We weighed the defensive effort too much toward protecting the homeland,” he said, “not understanding that we have to … protect lives at the same time that we protect values.”Mora believes that while those who used or authorized the use of torture could face prosecution outside the United States for war crimes, the political fallout from such an undertaking here renders that scenario virtually “unthinkable” because of the stature of those involved.At the very least, he says, publicly airing the report’s findings will provide some small measure of accountability, if not of the actors themselves, then for the nation moving forward.“We can’t create a precedent such that in the future, we weaken the prohibitions against torture … and then we eliminate the degree of accountability for having committed these crimes. That’s not a good result for the country” or for our desire to lead the world on this issue, Mora said.“We don’t want to make the world safe or safer for torture, we don’t want to increase the quantum of cruelty, we don’t want to decrease the accountability of those who apply cruelty to individuals around the world. That’s what our example has done and would continue to do unless we correct it.”last_img read more

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Michael Rupert & More Complete the Cast for On The Town

first_imgTony winner Michael Rupert (Legally Blonde: The Musical, Ragtime, Falsettos, Sweet Charity) and Allison Guinn (Hair) will join Tony Yazbeck, Jay Armstrong Johnson and Clyde Alves in the new Broadway revival of On the Town. Directed by John Rando, previews will start at the Lyric Theatre (formerly the Foxwoods) on September 20, with opening night set for October 16. Related Shows View Comments Rupert will play Judge Pitkin and Guinn will play Lucy Schmeeler. Phillip Boykin (The Gershwins’ Porgy and Bess) and Stephen DeRosa (Hairspray, The Nance, Into The Woods) also join the cast. The ensemble will feature Chip Abbott, Tanya Birl, Angela Brydon, Holly Ann Butler, Julius Carter, Kristine Covillo, Lori Ann Ferreri, Paloma Garcia-Lee, Stephen Hanna, Eloise Kropp, Brandon Leffler, Jess Leprotto, Cory Lingner, Skye Mattox, Michael Rosen, Samantha Sturm, Christopher Vo, Cody Williams and Mikey Winslow. Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 6, 2015center_img On the Town The cast will also include the previously reported Megan Fairchild, Alysha Umphress, Elizabeth Stanley and Jackie Hoffman. First seen on Broadway in 1944, On the Town follows the adventures of three sailors on leave in New York City. Based on the ballet Fancy Free by Jerome Robbins, the musical features music by Leonard Bernstein and book and lyrics by Betty Comden and Adolph Green. Toe-tapping hits from the show include “New York, New York,” “I Can Cook Too,” “Lonely Town” and “Some Other Time.” Yazbeck, Johnson and Alves will be reprising their roles from the 2013 Barrington Stage Company production of the tuner.last_img read more

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Brazil’s Rousseff, Mulling Jet Deal, Touts Defense

first_img Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff, who is deliberating a multi-billion dollar jet fighter deal, defended the need to spend money on defense at a time when she is making big budget cuts in other areas. Rousseff’s comments at a military ceremony in Brasilia are one of the clearest signs to date that she could move forward soon on a deal to buy at least 36 fighter jets from either U.S.-based Boeing, France’s Dassault Aviation or Sweden’s Saab. “A totally developed Brazil will need equipped, trained, modern Armed Forces,” Rousseff said. “Defense cannot be considered a lesser element on the national agenda.” Some critics have suggested that Rousseff should postpone the purchase of the warplanes until 2012 or later given that she just announced $30 billion in cuts in other areas to cool Brazil’s booming economy. Yet Rousseff told the audience it would be a “big mistake” to consider spending on upgrading military technology to be an “idle effort.” Rousseff said that Brazil needs a strong military to defend its new offshore oil reserves, as well as guarantee the security of the vast Amazon region. The aircraft deal has become one of the most hotly disputed trade and diplomatic issues under Rousseff’s administration, which took office on 1 January. She has cast the deal as a way to modernize Brazil’s Air Force as well as consolidate strategic partnerships over the coming decades. Rousseff’s recent actions and declarations have indicated she is leaning toward purchasing Boeing’s F-18, and U.S. President Barack Obama pushed the deal on a visit to Brasilia last month. However, Dassault and Saab have also expressed confidence that their bids are stronger, especially on transfers of proprietary technology that Rousseff has said are crucial to her decision. To defuse criticism of her budget priorities, Rousseff could announce the winner of the tender in coming months but defer any expenditures until 2012, or seek financing that would lessen the short-term blow of the purchase to government accounts. By Dialogo April 08, 2011last_img read more

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US Hands Over Donation to Guatemala to Fight COVID-19

first_imgBy Guatemalan Ministry of Public Health and Social Assistance/Edited by Diálogo Staff October 30, 2020 Guatemala’s Ministry of Public Health and Social Assistance and the Migration Institute received a donation from the U.S. government of 12 military field medical tents with a 16-people capacity, 142 folding cots, and two 30-kilowatt diesel generators.The donation totals $243,402.48, and was carried out by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the U.S. Department of Defense through U.S. Southern Command. These tents will help national hospitals and centers for returnees to create safe areas for COVID-19 testing, detection, treatment, and quarantine.The handover took place at the National Coordinator for Disaster Reduction (CONRED, in Spanish) facilities, with the participation of U.S. Ambassador to Guatemala Luis Arreaga, who stressed that “during a global health crisis, the United States collaborates with its friends, as we have done with Guatemala from the beginning of this worlwide crisis.” He added that the government he represents is working on delivering additional assistance in the coming weeks.Guatemalan Health Minister Amelia Flores, Foreign Minister Pedro Brolo, and CONRED Executive Secretary Oscar Cossío took part in the handover ceremony.The Guatemalan government thanks the United States for this donation.last_img read more

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Gov. Bush makes more JNC appointments

first_img Gov. Bush makes more JNC appointments September 1, 2001 Regular News Gov. Jeb Bush has named members to all but two of the state’s judicial nominating commissions under a new state law that gives him great control over the panels that screen applicants for judgeships. Under the new law, the governor must fill six vacancies on each of the state’s 26 JNCs. Five of those people, two of whom must be lawyers, are directly appointed by Bush, while the sixth must be from a list of three applicants forwarded by The Florida Bar. The governor, however, can reject a Bar list as many times as he wants, although he has not done so under the new law. In late July, Bush named members to the Second District Court of Appeal and 11 th, 13 th, and 15 th c ircuit JNCs (see the August 1 Bar News ), each of which had several vacancies pending. Early last month, his office announced the members of 20 more commissions. Still to be chosen at Bar News press time were members of the Supreme Court and 16 th C ircuit JNCs. The governor’s office also set up an August 14 training program for the new JNC members (see story, page 1). The following is a list of people appointed by Bush to the 20 JNCs. In each case, the first person appointed is from the list submitted by the Bar and the remainder are direct gubernatorial appointees: • First District Court of Appeal JNC – Robert P. Gaines of Pensacola, Edward P. Fleming of Pensacola, Jeanne M. Miller of Jacksonville, Maggie A. Moody of Tallahassee, Kevin Neal of Tallahassee, and Barbara H. Wright of Tallahassee. • Third District Court of Appeal JNC – Gerald B. Wald of Miami, Hector J. Lombana of Coral Gables, Norma S. Lindsey of Miami Beach, Matias R. Dorta of Miami, Mariaelena Villamil of Coral Gables, and Thomas R. Spencer of Miami. • Fourth District Court of Appeal JNC – Charles B. Morton, Jr., of Lauderhill, Thomas E. Sliney of Boca Raton, Paul O. Lopez of Ft. Lauderdale, Fernando L. Roig of Boca Raton, Richard L. Handley of Ft. Lauderdale, and Vernon D. Smith of Ft. Pierce. • Fifth District Court of Appeal JNC – Morgan L. Reinman of Merritt Island, C. Richard Newsome of Orlando, James A. “Skip” Fowler of Orlando, Edward L. Jasper of Port Orange, Jerry Buchanan of Orlando, and Lewis C. Webb of Rockledge. • First Circuit JNC – Linda H. Wade of Pensacola, Jackie L. Bytell of DeFuniak Springs, Eric J. Nickelsen of Pensacola, Stanley K. Luke of Crestview, Frederick J. McFaul of Milton, and Patricia H. Tolbert of Ft. Walton Beach. • Second Circuit JNC – Elaine N. Duggar of Tallahassee, Lynette G. Brown of Tallahassee, Jessica E. Varn of Tallahassee, Jason B. Gonzalez of Tallahassee, William W. Mahaffey of Quincy, and Kim E. McDowell of Tallahassee. • Third Circuit JNC – David A. Phelps of Perry, Almyra J. “Princess” Akerman of Madison, William W. Blue of Perry, William T. Nelson of Wellborn, Guy W. Norris, of Lake City, and Elizabeth W. Porter of Lake City. • Fourth Circuit JNC – Mary Bland Love of Jacksonville, Michael H. Stokes of Maxville, Cleve E. Warren of Jacksonville, Peter D. Sleiman of Jacksonville, Angela B. Corey of Jacksonville and Terrence James of Jacksonville. • Fifth Circuit JNC – Eric H. Faddis of Leesburg, Anne W. Corcoran of Crystal River, Michael A. Graves of Leesburg, Lisa Herndon of Williston, Thomas S. Hogan of Brooksville, and H. Randolph Klein of Ocala. • Sixth Circuit JNC – Sally D. Skipper of New Port Richey, Susan P. Bedinghaus of St. Petersburg, Nicole A. Kerr of New Port Richey, George M. Jirotka of Belleair Shore, Gary N. Strohauer of Seminole, and Darryl C. Wilson of St. Petersburg. • Seventh Circuit JNC – Rebecca R. Wall of Daytona Beach, Catheryn S. Martin of Daytona Beach, James D. Clark of Ponte Vedra Beach, Michael E. Glenn of Palatka, Maureen S. Christine of St. Augustine, and Sean Daley of Daytona Beach. • Eighth Circuit JNC – Zelda J. Hawk of Gainesville, Allen W. Clark of Raiford, Marjorie P. Hazouri of Gainesville, Rose Mary T. Oelrich of Gainesville, Caridad S. Gonzalez of Gainesville, and Robert L. Woody of Gainesville. • Ninth Circuit JNC – R. Lee Bennett of Orlando, LaVon W. Bracy of Orlando, R. David de Armas of Belle Isle, Valerie W. Evans of Orlando, Mario Romero of Orlando, and John T. Stemberger of Orlando. • 10 th C ircuit JNC – Deborah Lee Oates of Bartow, Judy Lee Brown of Sebring, Sylvia Blackmon-Roberts of Lakeland, John K. Stargel of Lakeland, G. Gregory King of Winter Haven, and Billy R. Ready of Auburndale. • 12 th C ircuit JNC – Gary L. Larsen of Sarasota, John L. “Jay” Crouse of Sarasota, J. Michael Hartenstine of Sarasota, Connie Mederos-Jacobs of Bradenton, Patrick K. Neal of Bradenton, and Marsha Nippert of Sarasota. • 14 th C ircuit JNC – John L. Fishel II, Julie A. Sombathy, William E. Miller, Marsha H. Lewis, Dixon R. McCloy, and Martha B. Blackmon-Milligan, all of Panama City. • 17th Circuit JNC – Walter R. Blake of Coral Springs, O’Neal Dozier of Pompano Beach, Davis W. “Bill” Duke of Ft. Lauderdale, Walter L. Morgan of Ft. Lauderdale, Georgina R. Pozzuoli of Weston, and William R. Scherer of Ft. Lauderdale. • 18 th C ircuit JNC – John R. McDonough of Orlando, Dixie N. Sansom of Cape Canaveral, Larry A. Dale of Sanford, Fernando M. Palacios of Melboune, Tiffany C. Loris of Palm Bay, and David W. Jackson of Cocoa. • 19 th C ircuit JNC – James L.S. Bowdish of Stuart, Nita G. Denton of Stuart, Linda B. Braswell of Stuart, Arlene V. Newson of Ft. Pierce, Thomas W. Lockwood of Wabasso, and Renee C. Marquis of Ft. Pierce. • 20th Circuit JNC – Darol H. M. Carr of Punta Gorda, Basil L. Bain of Naples, Stephany S. Carr of Naples, Harvey R. Elliott of Port Charlotte, Victoria M. Ho of Naples, and Mitchell T. “Ted” Randell of Ft. Myers. Under the old system, the Bar named three JNC members, the governor named three, and those six picked three public members. Under the new system, the governor directly appoints five JNC members, two of whom must be lawyers. He appoints the remaining four members from a list of three nominees for each vacancy submitted by The Florida Bar. The three previous Bar appointees on each JNC were allowed to continue serving under the new bill, but all other JNC members were dismissed, giving Bush six appointments to each panel. JNC members will continue to serve staggered terms.center_img Gov. Bush makes more JNC appointmentslast_img read more

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What’s a credit union to do in order to compete with those “B-words”?

first_imgThe question at the top of every CEOs mind: How can we ensure our survival into the future?  As we pore through every blog, article, and piece of research that we can get our hands on, we’re all looking for the same answer.  We’re directed to offer the best suite of financial services, have an online presence, “speak” to millennials, and offer the best rates.  We work diligently to be the best while our competitors – those 4-letter-word financial institutions – are doing the exact same.  To beat them, we need to do what credit unions do best: be our cooperative selves!  Thus my idea for the Financial Fun Fair was born.  To learn more about this innovative idea, check out my initial application and watch my application video therein.  This project will increase our membership by embracing the Cooperative Principles at a community level, bringing increased awareness of the Credit Union Difference!Cooperation: Among Cooperatives While many of the projects and ideas suggested to us are aimed at singular credit unions or internally at our employees, I am launching my project at a chapter level.  I don’t just want my credit union to survive; I want the Credit Union Movement as a whole to thrive. Henry Ford phrases it best when he says, “If everyone is moving forward together, then success takes care of itself.” While the “b-words” may do community service, you’d never see two or more of them partner up. This cooperation is our competitive edge. We need to embrace the cooperative mindset in order to bring the most value to the credit union industry as a whole, and that is exactly what my project does.Community: People Helping People continue reading » 11SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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FDA issues warning on raw-milk soft cheeses

first_img See also: Editor’s note: Based on a Food and Drug Administration news release, the original version of this story incorrectly listed Ranchero as one type of soft cheese that may be made from raw milk The FDA later issued a clarification saying that Ranchero is a trademark of the Cacique Co. of Industry, Calif., for a cheese made with pasteurized milk. Listeriosis, brucellosis, salmonellosis, and tuberculosis are among the illnesses the cheeses can spread, the agency said in a news release. Especially at risk are pregnant women, newborns, the elderly, and people with weakened immune systems. Mar 14 FDA news releasehttp://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/2005/ucm108420.htm Particularly hazardous are raw-milk soft cheeses from Mexico and Central American countries, the agency said. It recommended that consumers not eat any unripened, raw-milk soft cheeses from Mexico, Nicaragua, or Honduras. “Data show that they are often contaminated with pathogens,” the statement said. Mar 16, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – Soft cheeses made with raw milk can cause several serious infectious diseases, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned this week. “Recently, cases of tuberculosis in New York City have been linked to consumption of queso fresco style cheeses, either imported from Mexico or consumed in Mexico, contaminated with Mycobacterium bovis,” the statement said. The agency also warned against eating raw-milk soft cheeses bought at flea markets or from door-to-door sellers or carried in luggage from Mexico, Nicaragua, or Honduras. Raw-milk soft cheese from any source carries some risk, officials added. Queso fresco–style cheeses, popular among Hispanics, include Queso Panela, Asadero, and Blanco, among other types, according to the FDA. They may be imported or produced in the United States.last_img read more

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