Top News of the Week May 13 – 18, 2013

first_img Top News of the Week May 13 – 18, 2013 May 19, 2013 Authorities Back to overview,Home naval-today Top News of the Week May 13 – 18, 2013 center_img USS Kearsarge Anchors in Eilat, IsraelThe multi-purpose amphibious assault ship USS Kearsarge (LHD 3), along with embarked Marines from the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (26th MEU) arrived in Eilat, Israel for a regularly scheduled port visit, May 14.US Navy: First Mobile Landing Platform DeliveredThe Navy accepted delivery of the first Mobile Landing Platform, USNS Montford Point (MLP 1), from General Dynamics-NASSCO, May 14, in San Diego, Calif.INS Vikramaditya Undergoes Cosmetic Repairs before Delivery to Indian NavyThe aircraft carrier INS Vikramaditya has been put in a dry dock at Russia’s Sevmash shipyard for “cosmetic” repairs ahead of final sea trials and delivery to the Indian navy later this year, the company said.Russian Navy to Receive Newest Baltic Fleet WarshipRussia’s newest Baltic Fleet warship, the Project 20380 Boiky corvette, will be handed over to the Navy on May 16, St. Petersburg’s Severnaya Verf shipyard said on Monday. The Boiky has completed sea trials and undergone a series of final tests at the shipyard.British HMS Astute Submarine Wraps Up Final TrialsBritain’s first new hunter-killer submarine in a generation is preparing to take her place on the front line as her final trials come to an end in the USA.Russia Could Include Nuclear Sub in Its Mediterranean Task ForceRussia’s Mediterranean task force will comprise 5-6 warships and may be enlarged to include nuclear submarines, Navy Commander Adm. Viktor Chirkov said.   Share this articlelast_img read more

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Laali Vadlamani wins Union Presidency for Hilary 2018

first_imgLaali Vadlamani is the Oxford Union’s new President-elect for Michaelmas 2017 following her uncontested election on Friday 9 June. She will become President in Hilary term.The ex-Treasurer from Trinity College received 496 first preference votes, with 136 votes going to RON.This marks a particularly low turnout for the Union with only 770 members turning out to vote.Members also voted for New College’s Stephen Horvath as their Treasurer-elect and St John’s Ed Evans as Secretary. The Librarian-elect is to be Sabriyah Saeed. All officer positions were uncontested as was the position for President. The Standing Committee and Secretary’s Committee have also been elected with a particularly close result between Standing Committee candidates. Both sets of Committee positions were contested and saw James Lamming (Standing Committee) and Charles Wang (Secretary’s Committee) come out on top. Michael Harkness is the Returning Officer.  See the full results below:OFFICERSTreasurer-elect: Stephen Horvath – 499 (RON – 114)Secretary: Ed Evans – 498Librarian-elect: Sabriyah Saeed – 496 (RON – 119)STANDING COMMITTEE (in order of number of first-preference votes)James Lamming – 129Brian Wong – 126Shivani Ananth– 123Julian Kirk – 122Jan Bialas – 108Runner up: Grace Joel – 88SECRETARY’S COMMITTEE (in order of number of first-preference votes)Charles Wang – 82Shanuk Mediwaka – 77Adam Watson – 66Alex Yeandle – 63Abigail Ridsdill-Smith – 58Isabella Risino – 58Charlie Cheesman – 58Chris Garner – 51Freya Dixon Van Dijk – 50Genevieve Athis – 48Mike Fuller – 42Runner-up: Matthew Vautrey – 41First Eliminated: Will Taylor – 25last_img read more

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USI To Play Bellarmine Quarterfinals

first_imgFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare Eagles To Play Knights In GLVC QuarterfinalsThe eighth-seeded University of Southern Indiana men’s basketball team will play top-seeded Bellarmine University at noon Friday in the quarterfinals of the Great Lakes Valley Conference Tournament at Family Arena in St. Charles, Missouri. All-Tournament passes are $38, while adults and seniors tickets are $18 and students with a valid ID are admitted for $11 each day.Tickets can be purchase directly through Family Arena by phone (314-534-1111) and online . Fans also can purchase tickets through MetroTix.com by phone (800-293-5949) and online.In addition to the USI-Bellarmine quarterfinal game, the remaining quarterfinal games are scheduled to follow at 2:30 p.m. (fifth-seeded Lewis University vs. fourth-seeded University of Indianapolis), 6 p.m. (seventh-seeded Quincy University vs. second-seeded Drury University) and 8:30 p.m. (sixth-seeded Truman State University vs. third-seeded University of Wisconsin-Parkside). The men’s portion of the tournament continues Saturday with the semifinals at 6 p.m. and 8:30 p.m., while the championship game is slated for Sunday at 3:30 p.m.The match-up between the Screaming Eagles (19-10) and Knights (22-5) will be their second meeting in a little more than a week. USI defeated ninth-ranked Bellarmine in overtime, 89-82, last Thursday behind the double-double performance (19 points and 15 rebounds) of junior forward T.J. Tisdell (Cape Girardeau, Missouri).USI earned the right to play Bellarmine in the quarterfinals by posting an 86-72 victory over Rockhurst University in the first round of the GLVC Tournament at the Physical Activities Center Sunday afternoon. Tisdell led USI with a season-high 22 points, while junior guard Jeril Taylor (Louisville, Kentucky) posted his fifth double-double of the year with 19 points and 14 rebounds.last_img read more

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Gentlemen’s Day Saturday & Alles Brothers Day Sunday

first_imgDollar Day is Back This Sunday, Too! We are kicking off another exciting weekend of Live Racing this Friday! Saturday will be Gentlemen’s Day at the Track. Enter to win great prizes from Ellis Park! Then we will cap off the weekend on Sunday with Alles Brothers Day. Its another chance to win as we will give away great furniture from Alles Brothers Furniture! Sunday is also Dollar Day! Everyone can take part in $1 hot dogs, peanuts, ice cream, beer and bottled water.Don’t forget that we will be racing on Thursday, September 1st. This is to make up for our cancellation on the 4th of July.Our Live Racing season will wrap up on Labor Day, Monday, September 5th, 2016. We will run Friday, Saturday, Sunday & Labor Day, September 5th. There will be no live racing on September 3rd.  Grandstand opens at 9 AM, concessions & mutuels open at 11 AM, our first post begins at 12:50PM (Central Time). FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Hairy Bakers series starts tonight

first_imgThe Hairy Bakers will hit our screens tonight with a new series on BBC2 looking at all things bakery. Dave Myers and Simon King, known as the Hairy Bikers will embark on a journey across the UK to discover the best of British baking. They’ll meet with top millers and bakers and test out various recipes along the way, from gourmet bread and pies to ornate wedding cakes.The four-part series starting tonight – 18 August – will be screened from 8.30 – 9pm. The duo will be hopping on their bikes to take a look at the history of bread and demonstrating the rewards of baking a healthy white roll fit for the very British bacon buttie. The first episode also sees them mill their own flour at a Lincolnshire windmill to make a fermented classic brown loaf, producing homemade naan bread on the shores of a lake and bake brown ale and cheese bread back in Dave’s kitchen.The next episode on Bank Holiday Monday sees them making Bakewell tarts in Derbyshire, and scones at Chatsworth House. The boys also hunt for tips on how to make the perfect Victoria sandwich.A Christmas special is to follow later in the year.last_img read more

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Dave Matthews Band Announces 2019 Summer Tour

first_imgDave Matthews Band has announced their plans for a 2019 North American summer tour.Dave Matthews Band’s headlining summer tour will kick off on April 30th in Pensacola, FL and includes two-night stands in Camden, NJ; Noblesville, IN; Elkhorn, WI; Saratoga Springs, NY; West Palm Beach, FL; and Denver, CO. The band will return to the Gorge Amphitheatre for its traditional three-night Labor Day run August 30th through September 1st, pushing its total number of performances at the scenic venue above 60. Dave Matthews Band will also perform at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival on May 4th as part of the festival’50th-anniversary celebration. The band will conclude its North American tour on September 22nd at the 2nd annual Sea Hear Now Festival in Asbury Park, NJ.An online ticket presale for members of the DMB Warehouse Fan Association will begin Thursday, January 24, 10am ET here. Citi card members will have access to purchase pre-sale tickets February 19th at 10am ET through February 21 at 10pm ET. For complete presale details, click here.Tickets will go on sale to the general public on Friday, February 22 at 10am local time. Every Ticket Purchase can be redeemed for an Unreleased Live Recording from DMB’s 2018 tour. For the complete list of tour dates, visit the band’s website.Dave Matthews 2019 Summer Tour4/30 Pensacola, FL Pensacola Bay Center5/01 Jacksonville, FL Veterans Memorial Arena5/04 New Orleans, LA New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival5/07 Pelham, AL Oak Mountain Amphitheatre5/11 Nashville, TN Bridgestone Arena5/14 Des Moines, IA Wells Fargo Center5/15 Maryland Heights, MO Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre5/17 The Woodlands, TX Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavilion5/18 Dallas, TX Dos Equis Pavilion6/14 Camden, NJ BB&T Pavilion6/15 Camden, NJ BB&T Pavilion6/19 Bethel, NY Bethel Woods Center for the Arts6/21 Mansfield, MA Xfinity Center6/22 Hartford, CT Xfinity Theatre6/28 Noblesville, IN Ruoff Home Mortgage Music Center6/29 Noblesville, IN Ruoff Home Mortgage Music Center7/02 Cincinnati, OH Riverbend Music Center7/03 Tinley Park, IL Hollywood Casino Amphitheatre7/05 Elkhorn, WI Alpine Valley Music Theatre7/06 Elkhorn, WI Alpine Valley Music Theatre7/09 Clarkston, MI DTE Energy Center7/10 Toronto, ON Budweiser Stage7/12 Saratoga Springs, NY Saratoga Performing Arts Center7/13 Saratoga Springs, NY Saratoga Performing Arts Center7/17 Wantagh, NY Northwell Health at Jones Beach Theater7/19 Charlotte, NC PNC Music Pavilion7/20 Bristow, VA Jiffy Lube Live7/23 Alpharetta, GA Ameris Bank Amphitheatre7/24 Tampa, FL MIDFLORIDA Credit Union Amphitheatre7/26 West Palm Beach, FL Coral Sky Amphitheatre7/27 West Palm Beach, FL Coral Sky Amphitheatre8/23 Greenwood Village, CO Fiddler’s Green Amphitheatre8/24 Greenwood Village, CO Fiddler’s Green Amphitheatre8/27 West Valley City, UT USANA Amphitheatre8/30 Quincy, WA Gorge Amphitheatre8/31 Quincy, WA Gorge Amphitheatre9/01 Quincy, WA Gorge Amphitheatre9/04 Ridgefield, WA Sunlight Supply Amphitheater9/06 Stateline, NV Lake Tahoe Outdoor Arena at Harveys9/07 Sacramento, CA Golden 1 Center9/13 Phoenix, AZ Ak-Chin Pavilion9/22 Asbury Park, NJ Sea.Hear.Now FestivalView All Tour Dateslast_img read more

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Seeing, feeling, being

first_imgThree things make us human. We gaze at one another in a visual world, we inhabit mortal bodies, and we cope with feelings.Philosophers grapple with the implications of these basic facts, including the special feeling that allows us to experience emotional synchronicity with others. In turn, these basics have acquired formal names for purposes of study: visibility, embodiment, and empathy.On Friday and Saturday, philosophers and others will grapple with these durable issues during a symposium named for them. The organizer, Volkswagen Foundation Fellow Thiemo Breyer, who is just finishing a year at Harvard, is trained as a philosopher. At the University of Cologne in Germany, he is a professor of the “transformation of knowledge” and directs an interdisciplinary research team investigating the history of ideas, concepts of knowledge, and knowledge transfer.But for the symposium, which is funded by the foundation and supported by the Mahindra Humanities Center at Harvard, Breyer went beyond philosophy to pull in experts from other disciplines, including history, psychology, anthropology, political science, and media studies. “It’s a first,” he said of the eclectic gathering.In the past few decades, embodiment — “the body as a medium of expressing our intentionality,” said Breyer — has been a particular concern to philosophers. Visibility and empathy, meanwhile, have been treated separately from conceptions of the body, and by a wider mix of experts. (Brain scientists, for instance, are busy looking for the neurological centers where empathy resides.)During about a dozen formal presentations, the symposium will bring all three concepts together in a framework of “fruitful inter-disciplinarity,” said Breyer. The 15 presenters are from across the United States, as well as Slovenia, Germany, Israel, and Britain. Homi K. Bhabha, an India-born scholar of post-colonial literature and director of the Mahindra Center, will provide the introduction.“These concepts are very theoretical concepts, but they have to do with everyday experiences,” said Breyer. They traditionally have been moral investigations, but the naturalistic disciplines have a place, too. “To illustrate them, you need the empirical sciences,” he said.The goal is to take the ideas and give them a practical edge. “Concepts don’t float about in an eternal heaven of ideas,” said Breyer, who imagines that one day even policy recommendations could come out of studying the issues behind seeing, being seen, speaking through bodily gestures, and cultivating empathy. “Concepts are practical entities, not theoretical entities.”Yet for many centuries, a concept such as embodiment did seem afloat in that heaven of ideas. “From Plato onwards, [the body] was seen as a prison of the soul,” said Breyer, and the role of the philosopher was “to overcome the boundedness of the intellect to the senses.”By the 17th century, philosopher René Descartes still hewed to the same dichotomy of body and soul. It wasn’t until the last century that phenomenology and pragmatism “attempted to bring the two together again,” said Breyer.In the 21st century, except for the mind-centered domains of moral philosophy and ethics, many philosophers embrace “a naturalization of consciousness,” he said, looking for union with the sciences. “It’s more of a gradual model, where the mind is not a different kind of substance, but something that emerges out of the natural order.”Entwined with the concept of embodiment is that of visibility, or what Breyer called in a forthcoming essay in his volume “Normativity in Perception” (Palgrave Macmillan) “an essential characteristic of being human.”Central to that is the concept of the gaze. This glimpse linking one human to another can be welcoming, but also shaming, and dismissive. It can imply violence. It can be a tool of empathy, or the means to deny it. In part, the symposium will attempt to “discuss and systematize different types of social gazes,” he said.Philosopher Lauren Freeman of the University of Louisville will look at visibility and racial oppression. Breyer mentioned a favorite novel exploring the same theme of social invisibility, “Invisible Man” by Ralph Ellison. “He beautifully describes the gaze,” he said, “as a means of letting people know they are not there for us.”Developmental psychologist Henrike Moll of the University of Southern California, an expert on youthful perception, will examine the power of the gaze among children in “Seeing Each Other.” To Breyer, “the implications of the gaze” begin early, and are vital in forming healthy humans. “Being able to follow the gaze of another is a huge step in cognitive development,” he said. For infants, it is the first exercise in empathy.Media anthropologists Martin Zillinger and Anja Dreschke, both scholars in Germany, will look at the gaze and visibility as they are mediated through technology. They are experts in how cameras and smartphones, used to film rituals and distribute them, are altering traditional experiences of the sacred.With filmed ritual, the results generally create a social good. But “we should pay attention to these embodied forms of empathy mediated by smartphone,” said Breyer. He speculated that such devices increase social distance and could mute the power of the gaze. Reducing the number of face-to-face encounters between humans is “potentially dangerous,” Breyer cautioned, since it is already a struggle for people to hold onto empathy.Leading off the symposium with him on Friday will be Slovenian psychiatrist Borut Skodlar, once a colleague at the Center for Subjectivity Research in Copenhagen. “Exchanging gazes is a preverbal way to let others know what we think of them,” said Breyer. But Skodlar will introduce the idea that to those suffering from certain mental illnesses, including depression and schizophrenia, the gaze can be threatening.Within this idea is another that evolved while Breyer was at Harvard: that visibility and embodiment can express the potential for violence, that the gaze may be a portal for social and even physical mayhem. He has followed the Mahindra Center’s Mellon Fellowship program on violence and nonviolence this year, and delivered the first paper in a biweekly series of seminars.“That changed my whole project,” said Breyer, and inspired two scholarly articles on bringing violence into the discourse on embodied empathy.last_img read more

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Disease center seeks awareness

first_imgWorld Rare Disease Day took place Thursday and the University recognized the international event Feb. 23 with lectures and discussion panels, but Notre Dame offers a number of opportunities for students to be involved with rare disease studies throughout the year. Marisa Truong, program coordinator for the Center for Rare and Neglected Diseases (CRND), said the Feb. 23 event aimed to encourage others to become interested and involved in the rare disease community. “The goal of the event was to engage our students, faculty, patient families and our local community in a group discussion in order to find ways we can all collaborate to become better advocates for the rare disease community,” Truong said. The program consisted of four discussion panels, which focused on rare disease research, ethical dilemmas within rare disease work, patient family stories and student outreach through Rare Health Exchange, a collaborative that allows undergraduates to assist researchers by defining natural histories of the diseases. In hopes to increase awareness of rare and neglected diseases, CRND offers an undergraduate course titled “Developing Health Networks in Rare and Neglected Diseases.” Truong said the course has developed into a student collaborative with the Rare Health Exchange. Students are trained to assess rare disease medical records in order to help physicians and researchers develop natural history studies for them. “These studies are extremely useful for improving disease management, accelerating the time of diagnosis, and new drug development,” Truong said. Additionally, the Center hosts a Clinical Translational Seminar Series in which distinguished professionals who work with the rare disease community are invited to showcase the type of rare disease work interested students could become involved with. Patients and families directly affected by such diseases are also given the opportunity to share their story and raise awareness for the cause, Truong said. “[In this] patient outreach component, students engage with patient families in order to help them submit medical records to us for assessment,” Truong said. Truong said implementing rare disease education at the undergraduate university level is important. In this way, more of our communities are given an earlier exposure to the presence of rare diseases and can be informed of what they can do to help, she said. “[Through undergraduate awareness programs] people are then exposed to a variety of ways they can continue to advocate for rare diseases and are made aware of the socioeconomic and cultural issues involved,” Truong said.last_img read more

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Deborah Cox Channels Hollywood Glamour for Bodyguard Tour

first_imgDeborah Coxphoto by Joan Marcus We get so emotional, baby! Grammy nominee and Broadway alum Deborah Cox will soon be hitting the road as superstar singer and actress Rachel Marron in the upcoming national tour of The Bodyguard, the musical adaptation of the 1992 film that features the beloved hits of Whitney Houston. In this exclusive Hot Shot, Cox glimmers in costume designer Tim Hatley’s golden Oscar gown that conjures all kinds of old-school Hollywood glamour. “It’s fun for me as an artist to play dress up and to create characters,” Cox told Broadway.com. “This role is especially challenging because the songs are known all over the world, so everyone will have their expectation in how they would like to hear them. On top of that, Rachel is glamorous, strong and fiercely protective of her son, so you’ll see her moments of vulnerability as she slowly lets her guard down and falls in love. I’m looking forward to giving Rachel Marron a new life and introducing her to a whole new audience.” The Bodyguard tour will premiere at New Jersey’s Paper Mill Playhouse on November 25 before hitting the road in early 2017. View Commentslast_img read more

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Online, free training

first_imgBy Sharon DowdyUniversity of GeorgiaContinuing education for employees is important. But in hard economic times, many business owners can’t afford to train their staff. A new series of online videos from the University of Georgia provides training for workers in the landscape industry, and it’s free. Developed by the UGA Center for Urban Agriculture, the five “Safety Makes Sense” videos cover topics like lawnmower and equipment safety, poisonous plants and animals, appropriate clothing, sun protection, heat stress, heat stroke and repetitive motion injury as well as communicating with supervisors. OSHA approvedThe videos are approved by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and were funded by an OSHA Susan Harwood Grant. They are offered in both English and Spanish.“We knew the Spanish versions of our training videos would be popular,” said Ellen Bauske, the center’s program coordinator. “And, with the state’s budget situation, we can’t hire a full-time Spanish-speaking educator. The videos allow us to provide this training despite that.”In January, the videos made their debut on the center’s Web site, www.ugaurbanag.com/safety. Three weeks ago, they were added to youtube.com. They will soon be available on UGA’s iTunes site at www.itunes.uga.edu.The videos were placed online first and foremost because that’s what the industry requested, she said.What the industry wants“We surveyed the landscape industry and found out they need rainy-day, any-day training,” she said. “It’s hard for them to attend trainings on specific days because they need to plan work around Mother Nature. The videos allow them to be in control of when and where they train their staff.”For the next phase, Bauske is working with University of Florida Cooperative Extension to offer video training for English-speaking supervisors of Spanish-speaking employees.“We’d also like to offer video training on best management practices,” she said. “Where we go from here depends on whether we find a fund source.”In addition to the online videos, the center’s Web site provides English and Spanish versions of the Safety for Hispanic Landscape Workers manual. It’s designed in an easy-to-understand format with images to ensure employees understand the information regardless of language skills or literacy level.Employees aren’t the only ones that can benefit from the Web site’s resources. It also has information to help supervisors better communicate with a Hispanic workforce.last_img read more

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