Postdoctoral Fellow in Regenerative Medicine

first_imgDescriptionTwo Postdoctoral Trainee Positions are available immediately. Thequalified candidates will work on projects in developingbiomaterials for tissue engineering and controlled drug delivery.They will be primarily responsible for the biomaterial designs,characterizations and evaluations. The work includes syntheses ofthe biomaterials by organic, polymer and peptide synthesistechniques. It will also involve characterizations of thesynthesized biomaterials by using a number of sophisticatedcharacterization techniques including FT-IR, NMR, LC/MS/MS, UV/Vis,static and dynamic light scattering, confocal microscopy, flowcytometry, HPLC, rheometer, DSC, AFM, SEM, TEM, and microplatereader, etc. The position will also entail conducting invitro cell culture and ex vivo and in vivo animalwork. The individual will conduct data analysis, reporting, andmanuscript writing and may be asked to assist with other projectsin the laboratory on an occasional basis.QualificationsPhD in Materials Science and Engineering, Chemistry,Bioengineering, Chemical Engineering, Pharmaceutical Sciences, or aclosely related field. The individual must have strong technical,interpersonal and written communication skills. The candidate withstrong polymer and organic synthesis background is preferred.The positions are available immediately, but the start dates arenegotiable. It is expected that funding for this position will beavailable for one year; however, the position may be renewedannually, contingent upon acceptable job performance.Interested applicants should submit a cover letter with a summaryof research experience, curriculum vitae, and a list of threereferences by email to:Tao L. Lowe, Ph.D.Frederick G. Smith, MS, DDS and Venice K. Paterakis, DDSProfessorof Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and BioengineeringSchool of DentistryUniversity of Maryland650 West Baltimore Street, Rm 8251Baltimore, Maryland [email protected] :QualificationsPhD in Materials Science and Engineering, Chemistry,Bioengineering, Chemical Engineering, Pharmaceutical Sciences, or aclosely related field. The individual must have strong technical,interpersonal and written communication skills. The candidate withstrong polymer and organic synthesis background is preferred.last_img read more

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“READERS FORUM’ FOR FEBRUARY 17, 2019

first_imgWe hope that today’s “READERS FORUM” will provoke honest and open dialogue concerning issues that we, as responsible citizens of this community, need to address in a rational and responsible way?WHAT’S ON YOUR MIND TODAY?Todays“Readers Poll” question is:  Are you pleased that State Representative Ryan Hatfield (D-Evansville) legislation increases the penalties against people who commit crimes against animals?Please go to our link of our media partner Channel 44 News located in the upper right-hand corner of the City-County Observer so you can get the up-to-date news, weather, and sports.If you would like to advertise on the CCO please contact us at City-County [email protected]:  Any comments posted in this column do not represent the views or opinions of the City-County Observer or our advertisers.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Brook Food Processing Equipment

first_imgRecord Food Equipment, available from Brook Food Processing Equipment (Minehead, Somerset), has made jelly spraying easier.The Record Jelly Sprayer, is fitted with a fast compressed air joint at the front and, with its high-powered compressor, the sprayer can be used for many applications including those that require compressed air and those using the thickest of products, including glazing for Hot Cross Buns.Made from stainless steel, the unit is mobile and easy to clean, says Brook Food.last_img

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If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it

first_img Study shows students in ‘active learning’ classrooms learn more than they think Related Lessons in learning After using tools, the birds behave more optimistically, study suggests The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. Anyone who has ever tried to serve a tennis ball or flip a pancake or even play a video game knows, it is hard to perform the same motion over and over again. But don’t beat yourself up —errors resulting from variability in motor function is a feature, not a bug, of our nervous system and play a critical role in learning, research suggests.Variability in a tennis serve, for example, allows a player to see the effects of changing the toss of the ball, the swing of the racket, or the angle of the serve — all of which may lead to a better performance. But what if you’re serving ace after ace after ace? Variability in this case would not be very helpful.If variability is good for learning but bad when you want to repeat a successful action, the brain should be able to regulate variability based on recent performance. But how?That question was at the center of a recent study from Harvard researchers published in the journal Current Biology.Using an enormous amount of data from about 3 million rat trials, the researchers found that rats regulate their motor variability based on the outcomes of the most recent 10 to 15 attempts at a task. If the previous trials have gone poorly, the rats increased their amount of variability — employing a try-anything approach. However, if the previous trials have gone well, the rats limited their variability, proving that rats too subscribe to the old adage “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”But is this the best strategy?“By using simulations to determine what the optimal variability regulation strategy should be, we found that it was very similar to the one used by rats,” said Ashesh Dhawale, a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and first author of the study. “We also found that the degree to which individual rats regulated variability could predict how well they learned and performed on the motor task. This means that regulating variability based on performance is important for doing well both in the short and the long term.”,To study performance-dependent variability, the researchers developed a new motor learning task for rats. The researchers, led by Bence Ölveczky, professor of organismic and evolutionary biology, trained rats to press a 2D joystick towards a target angle. When the rats were successful, they got a sip of water. To keep the task from getting too easy, the researchers changed the target angle whenever the rat learned its location.The researchers found that when the rats were regularly getting rewarded, they had low variability. If, a few trials later, they did less well, their variability increased. If they continued doing poorly, the variability would increase even more.“We noticed this was happening on a pretty fast time scale,” said Maurice Smith, the Gordon McKay Professor of Bioengineering at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and co-author of the paper. “It was as if the rats were computing their batting average in real time.”But, what about longer-term tasks with less uncertainty? If you grew up playing tennis with your sister, for example, you may know that she has a consistently weak forehand.The researchers simulated this scenario by keeping the target angle of the joystick fixed over many sessions instead of constantly changing it.“We found that rats stopped regulating variability in response to recent performance, which matches what we found in our simulations,” said Dhawale. “Variability regulation in this case had a timescale of several thousand trials, which was much slower than the reward-dependent regulation of variability that we had uncovered earlier.”“Our results demonstrate that the brain flexibly adapts components of its trial-and-error learning algorithm, such as the regulation of variability, to the statistics of the task at hand,” said Ölveczky. “We have shown that the brain uses a sophisticated algorithm to regulate motor variability in a way that improves task performance.”The research was co-authored by Yohsuke R. Miyamoto.The research was supported in part by the National Institutes of Health. Clever crowslast_img read more

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Midnight march and prayer service honor Martin Luther King Jr.

first_imgHundreds of candles shined through a cold winter night as Notre Dame students, faculty and staff congregated at midnight to celebrate the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. early Monday morning.The midnight march and prayer service was the kickoff event for the inaugural Walk the Walk Week at Notre Dame, a series of events designed to reflect on King’s legacy and promote diversity and inclusion at Notre Dame. Katie Galioto | The Observer Students, faculty and staff process from the Main Building with candles to the statue of the Sacred Heart of Jesus following a prayer service reflecting on the life and legacy of Martin Luther King Jr.As attendees entered the Main Building, they were handed candles and directed towards the rotunda beneath the golden dome. Members of the Notre Dame community crowded on the main floor and in overlook areas on higher floors.The march was originally scheduled to start outside of Hesburgh Library and finish with a prayer service at the Grotto. However, organizers modified the plan due to dangerous wind-chill conditions and expected snowfall, according to a University-wide email.University President Fr. John Jenkins began the prayer service by encouraging students to strive for courage and determination to follow King’s example.“It would have been nice to have a march outside, but there’s something special about being here, under the golden dome, the heart of campus, as we pray and as we start this celebration of Dr. King’s legacy,” he said.Eric Love, director of staff diversity and inclusion, delivered a speech examining the importance of King’s legacy, both from a global perspective and in relation to Notre Dame.“Arguably, the most profound reason we are here at midnight is because of King’s achievement of making the promise of the U.S. Constitution more true,” he said. “We claimed all men are created equal, but we didn’t practice that promise of our own Constitution.“We talked the talk, but we did not walk the walk.”Love said King’s legacy has a special meaning at Notre Dame because University President Emeritus Fr. Ted Hesburgh was an avid supporter of the Civil Rights Movement.“King wanted to be a pastor in a Southern Baptist church and simply raise his family. Fr. Hesburgh said if he had to do it all over again, he would still choose to be a priest,” Love said. “But neither one could stand idly by and let the injustices of the time go unchallenged.”Love encouraged members of the Notre Dame community to make others feel welcomed and comfortable on campus.“It doesn’t matter where you are from, your religion, your ethnicity, sexual orientation or family income,” he said. “Whoever you are, if you are here, you are part of our family, and you should be expected to be treated with dignity and respect.”Love concluded his speech by challenging students, staff and faculty at Notre Dame to make a difference in the world.“I have no doubt that we have the brilliance and tenacity of Dr. King and the political savvy and compassion of Fr. Hesburgh among us this morning — among us in you,” he said. “My question for you is, what will you do to walk the walk?”Following the prayer service, attendees were invited to place their candles by the statue of the Sacred Heart of Jesus. Hundreds of paper luminaries lined the walkways from the Main Building.Sophomore Katie Hearn said she felt a strong sense of community and solidarity while standing and praying with her fellow Notre Dame students.“Everyone had their own reasons and motivations for going,” she said. “But these different reasons brought us all together and created an atmosphere of prayer and togetherness that, to me, was something special.”Junior Joe Etling said the only events he considers similar to the midnight prayer service during his time at Notre Dame were Fr. Hesburgh’s funeral and Holy Week.“I think it’s important for us and for anyone to celebrate Martin Luther King Day because of what he stood for and what he did for this country,” he said.Students, staff, faculty and other community members were invited to eat breakfast in South Dining Hall after the event.Tags: Hesburgh, march, Martin Luther King Jr., MLK, MLK Day, NDWalktheWalk, Prayer service, Walk the Waklast_img read more

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Broadway Balances America Goes Behind the Scenes of the Cabaret Tour

first_img View Comments Happy to see you! Broadway Balances America, the special six-part series airing on The Balancing Act on Lifetime Television, returned on January 26 with a special look at Roundabout Theatre Company’s 50th anniversary touring production of Cabaret, directed by Sam Mendes and Rob Marshall. Correspondent Amber Milt gets a firsthand look at the show’s casting process, costumes, choreography and more. Also, she meets Cabaret’s Kit Kat Girls and Boys, the nightclub performers who act, sing, dance and play their own instruments. Click play! Broadway Balances Americalast_img

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The RightThing Acquires AIRS

first_imgThe RightThing Acquires AIRS, First-of-Kind Recruitment DealAcquisition Combines Best-in-Class Services with Award-Winning Recruitment Software and Training SolutionsFebruary 18, 2008 The RightThing, a leader in customized recruitment process outsourcing (RPO) announced Monday the acquisition of AIRS, an award-winning recruitment training and sourcing technology company, based in Wilder, VT. AIRS will remain in Vermont at current staffing levels, according to the company.The acquisition will enhance The RightThing’s services by integrating AIRS recruitment sourcing software as well as training solutions, delivering customers a comprehensive suite of tools. AIRS A-list clients, including 70 percent of the Fortune 500, will benefit from The RightThing’s strong customer service as well as scalable and customized end-to-end recruitment options. AIRS products and training solutions will remain intact under The RightThing’s family of services.”The RightThing is very excited to welcome AIRS to the family,” said Terry Terhark, president and CEO of The RightThing. “AIRS thrives on innovation as does The RightThing, the synergy and cultural match of these two companies could potentially be the biggest thing this industry has seen with best-in-class technology, products, efficiency and power.”As the leader in recruitment process outsourcing, The RightThing has been building momentum since its inception in 2003 with exponential employee, client and revenue growth year after year, and award-winning thought leadership. With sourcing tools and training that help recruiters find the best talent, AIRS, founded in 1997, has experienced a 40 percent growth rate the past three years.”The RightThing and AIRS is a powerful combination of technology enabled services,” said Jason Corsello, vice president of Knowledge Infusion. “This has truly created a one-stop shop for any company’s entire recruiting and sourcing needs.””Together, The RightThing and AIRS will undoubtedly become one of the fastest growing recruiting solutions company in the industry,” said Chris Forman, president of AIRS. “Joining The RightThing will create a true paradigm shift for recruiting solutions. By offering top-notch services, technology and thought leadership under one unified company we will provide better hires and better outcomes to all of our clients.”Financial details were not disclosed.###About The RightThingAs the market leader in Recruitment Process Outsourcing, The RightThing redefines organizations’ approach and attitude towards recruiting and hiring processes. By developing and implementing strategic procedures for both national and global assignments, The RightThing consistently meets and exceeds client goals. Both short and long-term projects benefit from The RightThing’s smart solutions. For more information please visit http://www.rightthinginc.com(link is external).last_img read more

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Operation Martillo: A year of hammering down narco-traffickers

first_img Infosurhoy: How are we planning to support these Caribbean nations, so we can create a no way out situation for the traffickers? Rear Admiral Charles D. Michel, Director of JIATF-S: Actually, the number one success of Operation Martillo has been the increased cooperation of all the nations that are participating in combating this threat to national, regional, and international security. All the nations along the Central American isthmus, the United States, European partners, Canadians, etc., have been working more closely than ever in my 30 years or so working this particular problem set, as a direct result of Operation Martillo. Getting to the figures side of the house, since we started Operation Martillo on Jan. 15, participating nations have interdicted about 127 metric tons (279,987.07 pounds) of cocaine, which is a huge quantity of cocaine, most of that policed up in the air or on the water before even getting to the land masses of Central America where traffickers create the corruption, crime and gang problems that are associated with illicit trafficking. In addition, we have been able to take down 56 go-fast boats – typically those go-fast boats carry about a metric ton of cocaine each –, six pangas, two motor vessels, two semi-submersible vessels, two sailing vessels, six vehicles, seven fishing vessels and 12 aircraft, as well as all those individuals who were operating those crafts who are now witnesses and evidence that we can use to not only take down those individuals who were operating those crafts, but most importantly, the organizations that have been sending those crafts towards their neighbors in an attempt to get the drugs to the markets where they are consumed. Rear Adm. Michel: We are actually in the process of looking at Operation Martillo. We don’t want to become stale; we want to make sure we are adjusting things. The reality of what we are going to have to do with Operation Martillo is, number one, we are going to have to deal with the resource challenges that all of us have. Unfortunately from the United States side, we are in a very difficult budget and resource environment. We are going to have to adjust to that downrange. We are going to make our assets even smarter that they are today, even more capable than they are today. We are going to have to increase our cooperation and capacity building with partner nations, all that type stuff we are going to have to do. But the maturation of Operation Martillo is going to take us beyond where we are right now. Right now we have been dealing with the go-fast and semi-submersible, but we are going to – in the next iteration of Operation Martillo – add on things like a container initiative. So we stood up a container intelligence cell at JIATF-S that is going to focus on container movements through the area and try to synchronize that with Operation Martillo. We are also going to try to synchronize our counter threat financing efforts, which deals with bulk movements of cash sometimes by the same go fast boats that deliver products up north and bring bulk cash down south. These organizations also have to finance their operations which create vulnerabilities that we can track their financial flows. So we are going to bolt those things on Operation Martillo and try to bring them into the fight. We are also going to try to work some sensing operations with non-core Martillo partners, these are partners that primarily because of geography are not in the threat stream, but we are going to try to work closely with them. For example, Peru, Chile, Brazil are examples of countries with which we are running some sensing operations around the flanks to make sure that while we have been focused on the Central American isthmus there is nothing we are missing on our flanks. So we are going to try to bolt on some operations there, in a very resource-challenged environment, so we are going to have to be really smart with the way we are doing things, but we are going to take Operation Martillo to another level beyond where it is now. Infosurhoy: We talked about the figures, but how about changes in illicit traffic routes. Have you seen a change during this year? Infosurhoy: Working with so many countries could be testing. Can you explain to us how you are resolving those challenges? By Dialogo January 08, 2013 Infosurhoy: Can you elaborate on any new techniques or procedures developed in countering illicit trafficking in the air or maritime domains as a result of Operation Martillo? Rear Adm. Michel: The reason that I am here at SOUTHCOM is to participate in the Caribbean Nations Security Conference (CANSEC) where the Caribbean nations have come together to talk about regional security; and the number one security concern in the region is due to illicit trafficking. Here is what I reported to our Caribbean partners: we have not yet been able to sense significant shifts of those flows (of illicit drugs) from Central America, which constitutes over 90% of the flows that are moving in this particular region. The Caribbean still has flows, in the Eastern Caribbean primarily coming from Venezuela, and in the Central Caribbean coming from the north coast of Colombia and Venezuela up primarily Hispaniola with the Dominican Republic being the main area. They are still impacted by those threat streams, we work on those threat streams, not only with the partners in the area – and that’s the reason we are here in CANSEC – but also with regional partners… the French, the Dutch, the United Kingdom, who have significant presence in this area, as well as the Canadians. All trying to bring those scarce resources together to take and apply them against those threat streams. We have not yet seen significant shifts in the Central Caribbean or the Eastern Caribbean although we remain alert to those shifts because they could occur. Infosurhoy: Although Operation Martillo is led by JIATF-S, under the direction of SOUTHCOM, it has become a great example of a successful regional collaboration among partner nations. Do you consider that these successes that we can count today are direct results of that collaboration? Can you provide examples? center_img Rear Adm. Michel: Operation Martillo is owned by all the partners and stakeholders who contribute to this enterprise. JIATF-S plays an important role because we facilitate things, but many of these assets don’t work for JIATF-S. For example, in this semi-submersible takedown (…) the Costa Rican Coast Guard, the Panamanian Aeronaval Service that participated, they don’t work for JIATF-S, they work for their countries but they were able to contribute their assets in a unity of effort format to take advantage of all the other international, U.S. and partner nation assets that were out there, as well as the intelligence capabilities, in order to take down that semi-submersible vessel. Is that hard? Darn right, that’s hard! But Operation Martillo has created that framework to provide for a true unity of effort, coalition, interagency, whole of government operations, and that is a level of difficulty that is unprecedented in my opinion anywhere else on the planet, for this type of target set. And I would include even some of the kinetic theaters that are going on overseas because the difficulty of dealing with these guys is that you have to take them down, you have to collect evidence, you have to put them in the judicial system, you have to get these guys in jail, and that adds another whole level of complexity and difficulty on coalition operations. Rear Adm. Michel: No question about it! Over two third of the interdictions that we have been able to put together with Operation Martillo have been done with partner nations. That is the highest figure in history and frankly, I want to continue to build that out because this is truly a coalition effort. Just last week, an international effort took down a semi-submersible craft near the border of Costa Rica and Panama. That craft, which is virtually undetectable, had an estimated 6,000 kilograms of cocaine on board, that’s a wholesale value of about $150 million, and street value of about two or three times that amount. It would have been devastating if that craft had made it to its intended destination, which was the eastern area of Honduras. Honduras is already the most violent country on Earth, largely because the cocaine trade works its way across there. Another six metric tons of that would have been devastating. But that semi-submersible craft was taken down by an international effort consisting of Costa Rican Coast Guard vessels, Panamanian SENAN [National Aeronaval Service], a Canadian P-3, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (P-3), U.S. Navy (P-3), a Coast Guard aircraft and a Coast Guard cutter, all working together to take down that target. That’s an example of the type of international cooperation that is unprecedented and a direct result of Operation Martillo. And that resulted in six metric tons of cocaine been taken down, as well as the witnesses and the evidences that will allow us to ultimately to take down the network that started these activities. Infosurhoy: Looking at 2013, what are the main goals for Operation Martillo? MIAMI, U.S.A. – Almost a year after Operation Martillo embarked on cornering go-fasts, semi-submersibles, and even panga boats on the waters along the Central American isthmus, the multinational coalition effort spearheaded by U.S. Joint Interagency Task Force – South (JIATF-S) can boast of an impressive roster of figures that proves its success in hammering down illicit traffickers in our hemisphere. Still, during a recent interview with Infosurhoy, JIATF-S director Rear Admiral Charles D. Michel, opted to focus on what he considers the true beauty of Operation Martillo: the unparalleled cooperation between countries from different parts of the world, something that, he assured, he had never seen in his “30 years of working with this particular problem set.” During the interview, Rear Adm. Michel offered details on how this collaboration is actually achieved and what the next targets are for an operation that can’t afford to get stale. Rear Adm. Michel: The takedown of this semi-submersible vessel is an example of the ability to develop a high-caliber intelligence to be able to get these very dark, highly mobile asymmetric targets, and the operational procedures in place to be able to deal with every type of partner, from partners like the Canadians and their P-3s which are high-end equipment, to partners who have more challenges on resources such as the Costa Rican Coast Guard which has very small vessels with very little detection and monitoring capabilities. The operational procedures, the command and control backbone, the information sharing ability to do that on a tactical actionable basis where you may only have a short time available to work, our target set, all that type of stuff is what we want to build on the future and it is exportable to other realms. That, coincidentally was one of the things that I brought to the group at CANSEC for the Caribbean nations to be able to try to replicate those types of procedures and successes we have in Operation Martillo (…) in order to achieve a truly regional, strategic effect. Rear Adm. Michel: Yes, but we are not done yet. Operation Martillo is designed to deny or significantly hamper the ability of the traffickers to operate in the littoral routes along both sides of the Central American isthmus and force them into the deep-water routes. We have not achieved that on both sides of the isthmus. On the Caribbean side we have been able to change some of the trafficking patterns. We have seen strategic shifts in trafficking patterns in the Western Caribbean. In the Eastern Pacific side we are still working on that. We have seen some shifts but on the Pacific side we have a lot more challenges than we do on the Caribbean side in significantly changing those routes. One thing I will say about routes outside of Central America is that we have not yet been able to sense significant shifts into other routes, for example deeper into the Eastern Pacific or to Asia, or through the Central Caribbean or Eastern Caribbean. Those routes are essentially the same as they were before but we are constantly trying to sense those routes. We also have not seen shifts in conveyances yet, the traffickers still prefer to use about 80% maritime, about 20% air. I haven’t seen significant shifts to other things such as containers or other types of crafts yet, but we are constantly monitoring that. This is a very elusive adversary who does everything possible to hide things from us, so it remains challenging. Infosurhoy: Admiral, in figures, what would you say are the most important achievements of Operation Martillo during its first year of existence? last_img read more

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What not to do when you are job hunting

first_imgWe’ve all been through a job search at least a couple of times in our lives. If you’re looking for a new gig, here are 5 things you shouldn’t do.Only apply for jobs online: The internet is a great way to discover job openings, but sometimes you have to get off that couch and do some work. A resume can make you look good, but a smile and a handshake can really sell the first impression, so don’t be afraid to get out there and pound the pavement.Tell co-workers about it: You may think you have some close friends at the office, but things always seem to get around, so it’s probably best to keep news of your job search to yourself. The last thing you want is to have your boss scrutinizing your every move.Apply for jobs you’re overqualified for: You find yourself not having much luck getting interviews for jobs you’re qualified for, so you think it may be best to aim a little lower. Wrong. You’re good at what you do. Those jobs are too easy for you. Hiring managers know this. They know you’ll be bored and unchallenged. Go after those jobs that will test your skills and abilities.Go to every interview: Sometimes the interview process can be overwhelming. Sometimes in the middle of the process your gut tells you that you’re in the wrong place. I once had a hiring manager call to reschedule a 3rd interview with her company. The minute I hung up the phone, I immediately knew the job wasn’t for me. I called her back and told her the truth. She appreciated me not wasting her time.Accept the first offer you get: You may be stressed and frustrated that you can’t find your dream job, but don’t get stuck in a bad situation because you’re having trouble being patient. Have faith that you’ll find something better and let the process run its course. You’ll be much happier accepting a dream job instead of just settling for a new job. 41SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Pettit John Pettit is the Managing Editor for CUInsight.com. John manages the content on the site, including current news, editorial, press releases, jobs and events. He keeps the credit union … Web: www.cuinsight.com Detailslast_img read more

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Big pensioners not likely to be teachers

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionFor the purposes of clarity, your Feb. 18 article on school employee benefits should have stated that most, if not all, of the persons in your “six-figure pension club” are retired superintendents or other high-level administrators.I know several of them from my years as president of the Saratoga County School Boards Association. To simply refer to them as “educators” can lead some people to conclude that they are typical classroom teacher pensioners. The listed pensions are going to a relatively small number of top-of-the-line employees who worked year-round and received both higher salaries and enhanced benefits. You really should also include the fact that some long-retired teachers are “living” on extremely low pensions as well. Bill ShawBallstonMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?Police: Schenectady woman tried to take car in Clifton Park hours after arrest, release in prior the…EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristslast_img read more

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