CRDB Bank Plc (CRDB.tz) Q12020 Interim Report

first_imgCRDB Bank Plc (CRDB.tz) listed on the Dar es Salaam Stock Exchange under the Banking sector has released it’s 2020 interim results for the first quarter.For more information about CRDB Bank Plc (CRDB.tz) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the CRDB Bank Plc (CRDB.tz) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: CRDB Bank Plc (CRDB.tz)  2020 interim results for the first quarter.Company ProfileCRDB Bank Plc is a wholly-owned private commercial bank in Tanzania offering a comprehensive range of retail, commercial, corporate, treasury, premier and wholesale microfinance services. The company has an extensive infrastructure of branches, ATMs and deposit and mobile terminals and uses a vast network of Fahari Huduma agents which are microfinance agents. The retail division offers financial solutions which range from current and fixed deposit accounts to home purchase and construction loans, refinancing and cash back services. The corporate division provides financial service across the board; including documentary collection, letters of credit, guarantees, structured trade finance, treasury services and foreign exchange risk management. Established in 1996, CRDP Bank Plc has three subsidiary companies; CRB Bank Plc Burundi, CRDB Microfinance and CRDB Insurance Brokers.CRDB Bank Plc is listed on the Dar es Salaam Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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These 2 FTSE 100 shares are bucking the 2020 stock market crash. Here’s what I’d do now

first_imgThese 2 FTSE 100 shares are bucking the 2020 stock market crash. Here’s what I’d do now Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! See all posts by Alan Oscroft Alan Oscroft | Tuesday, 17th November, 2020 | More on: EXPN HSV I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this.center_img The FTSE 100 is still down 15% in the 2020 stock market crash. But some robust stocks have held up, and some are even in big profit territory this year. The first stock I’m looking at today is so far flat in 2020.HomeServe (LSE: HSV) provides emergency home electrical and plumbing repairs. And we’d expect those services to be in big demand when people are stuck at home more than usual, right? First-half results released Tuesday say yes. Well, statutory figures were down but, on an adjusted basis, things look bright.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…Adjusted EBITDA grew by 18%, with pre-tax profit up 16%. With earnings per share up 9%, the company has lifted its interim dividend by 7% to 6.2p per share. The only real downside for me is that debt has grown 30% to £586m. But the company says that’s partly down to the impact of previous merger and acquisition activity.Acquisitions and debtHomeServe puts its leverage at 2.0x, which is at the top end if its target range of 1.0x to 2.0x. The firm still has around £480m headroom from total debt facilities of £1,010m. So, unlike many struggling during the stock market crash, HomeServe doesn’t seem to have any immediate liquidity problems.European membership numbers are holding steady, though that alone would not get me too excited. But the company is enjoying strong growth in North American memberships, and I see great opportunities there.As part of its ‘buy-and-build’ strategy, HomeServe has made nine new acquisitions across North America, France and Spain. And that’s how future growth is likely to continue. Growth through acquisition can be very profitable, and debt funding can gear up the potential profits. I am wary of debt building up, though I’m not seeing any over-stretching at this point. I’m putting HomeServe on my buy list, though not at the top.Stock market crash winnerNever mind just holding up, my second today is 15% ahead in 2020. That’s a great result any time, but it’s especially welcome in a stock market crash year. I’m talking of financial data company Experian (LSE: EXPN). Whichever way markets are moving, financial data (including credit information) is crucial. And I’m thinking that should provide a very profitable future for firms like this.Experian also released first-half results Tuesday and, again, I like what I see. Organic revenue is up a modest-but-pleasing 2%. Revenue is picking up too, with a 5% organic gain in the second quarter. Though statutory EPS dropped 9%, the firm recorded a 2% rise in what it considers its benchmark EPS. There’s an interim dividend of 14.5 cents per share, unchanged from last year.Chief executive Brian Cassin said: “While Covid-19 has significantly impacted the macroeconomic environment, it has also catalysed trends which play to Experian’s strengths.”Deserved high valuation?So, we’ve had a health disaster and a stock market crash. But guess what? In such times, businesses rely possibly even more critically on the kind of financial information provided by Experian.My only reservation about Experian is the stock’s valuation. After such a good run this year, we’re looking at a forecast P/E of around 40 now. And that’s in a year when EPS growth is expected to stall. Still, growth should resume next year. Experian is on my list as a potential buy. Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Enter Your Email Address Image source: Getty Images Alan Oscroft has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has recommended Experian and Homeserve. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors.last_img read more

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The AstraZeneca share price outperformed the FTSE 100 in 2020

first_imgSimply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Most shares have performed badly in 2020, but a select few have done very well. Some, like AstraZeneca (LSE: AZN), have had a pretty flat year, but they’ve outperformed the FTSE 100. And that alone is, in my view, a terrific result. The AstraZeneca share price is down a couple of percent in 2020, well ahead of the Footsie’s 16% fall.At one stage, AstraZeneca was doing a lot better. The early pandemic shock led many investors to pretty much abandon shares altogether. But once nerves started to settle, many piled into pharmaceuticals shares. That’s understandable, and some smaller biotechnology stocks scored quick multi-bagger gains.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…At one stage in July, the AstraZeneca share price had climbed 33% from its start-of-year price. But the rush to the pharmaceuticals sector was largely indiscriminate. And it soon became clear any Covid-19 vaccines that were developed weren’t going to be sold at get-rich-quick prices.The AstraZeneca vaccine has been developed in partnership with Oxford University, and it’s effectively going to be sold at cost price (including to developing countries). Estimates of the actual price vary, but it sounds like around £2-£3 per dose.AstraZeneca share price retreatAs investors realised they wouldn’t be filling their pockets overnight, AstraZeneca shares fell back. At the time of writing, it looks like we’ll be close to break-even by the end of the year. But that’s still a decent, wealth-preserving performance in a torrid year. And it looks a little bit better with the expected 2.8% dividend yield included.If that’s what’s happened in 2020, what does 2021 and beyond hold? For me to get a handle on that, I’d need to eliminate any Covid-19 vaccine effect and think about the company’s genuine long-term prospects. And that’s a bit tricky right now.AstraZeneca’s turnaround under chief executive Pascal Soriot was always going to take a long time. And its shares were surely set for a tentative few years. The company was losing some key blockbuster patents. And it does usually take a very long time to get a new drug through the development, testing and approvals process. The accelerated Covid-19 programme in 2020 was, and I’m sure will remain, very much an exception.Back to long-term growth?Now, after years of earnings falls, analysts are finally predicting a return to EPS growth in 2020 and beyond. The big question is whether this is a short-term rebound or the start of a long-term bull run for AstraZeneca. We’ve seen a couple of false starts in recent years and I’d expected the 2016-17 period to mark the turnaround. I was wrong that time. But I do now believe we’re finally heading into a sustainable growth period. But how much of the potential is already built into the AstraZeneca share price? For the current year, forecasts suggest a P/E multiple of around 25. That’s high for a blue-chip FTSE 100 company. It would drop on 2021 expectations, to about 20.With the future growth that I think is finally there, I’d rate that as fair value. I do expect further volatility, and possible some share price weakness, in 2021. But I’d buy AstraZeneca for the long term. Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Alan Oscroft | Tuesday, 22nd December, 2020 | More on: AZN Image source: Getty Images Enter Your Email Addresscenter_img Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Alan Oscroft has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. The AstraZeneca share price outperformed the FTSE 100 in 2020 I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. See all posts by Alan Oscroftlast_img read more

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Charities losing their share of public attention, says Charity Monitor

first_img Howard Lake | 4 July 2004 | News Tagged with: Individual giving Research / statistics An analysis of Charity Monitor survey data over the last few years suggests that charities in general have not been maintaining their share of public attention.Charity Monitor reports that in the last five years there has been an average drop of 9% in spontaneous awareness of charities. The fall has been most severe among the over 75 year-olds whose spontaneous recall is down on average by 24%. The next biggest fall was among under 35’s (-9.5%) and least affected were the 35-74’s (-7.5%).The decline in total (prompted) awareness is marked. At the start of the last decade eight charities had total awareness scores of 90% or higher. This had been reduced to only one by 2003, with the majority now scoring below 80%. Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Charities losing their share of public attention, says Charity Monitorcenter_img  22 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Andrew Papworth of Charity Monitor is convinced that the phenomenon is real but admits that it is hard to be sure what has caused it. “It could be a sign of falling interest in charities or disillusionment with them. It could be a sign of so-called compassion fatigue,” he said. “Or it could be that there are now so many charities clamouring for our attention these days that the currency of awareness has become devalued. Perhaps there is overkill and people are switching off.” Another possible explanation that Papworth wonders about is a fundamental change in fundraising methods to what he calls the ‘oozlum-bird strategy’. “In the last few years,” he said, “many charities have switched their attention and resources from a mix of mass marketing and targeted fundraising to micro-marketing alone with RoI as king. Could it be that ever-increasing accuracy of targeting on responders means that the sector is disappearing up its own bottom line and neglecting to make their case to the wider public?”Whatever the reason, Papworth thinks that falling awareness levels do matter. He argues that it is undeniable that it is very much harder for a charity to get potential supporters to act if they’ve never heard of it and know nothing about it. “Think about somebody drawing up a Will and contemplating a charitable bequest,” he said. “Unless you have managed to lodge your charity in his or her mind over the years and made a case for support, the chances are that the last convincing mailshot to have landed on the doormat will spring to mind and you’ll be cut off without a bean.”He also wonders whether some major charities have been guilty of feeding off the awareness they created a generation or more ago and have become so fixated by the immediate returns from the current best prospects that they have ignored their seed corn. Of course, as Papworth acknowledges, the cost of sustained “hearts and minds” advertising in today’s fragmented multi-media world is enormous and the pay-off has to be thought of in terms of years rather than weeks. This makes it a major act of faith for trustees to sanction. But he believes that failure to invest for the future will prove damaging to the sector in the long run. “It mirrors the arguments that go on within FMCG marketing between the proponents of brand-building advertising and sales promotion,” said Papworth. “The fact remains that the brands that have been most successful in the long-term have been those which have maintained a mix with a strong element of brand advertising.”The Charity Monitor was designed and launched by Andrew Papworth for the RNLI 14 years ago and has been running every four months since then. Its primary purpose was to provide the RNLI with authoritative information on its public awareness and on the public’s likelihood to donate to “the Lifeboats” in the context of what was happening to other charities and wider market factors. Surveys are carried out in April, August and December each year among 1,000 adults representative of the population of Great Britain. Data from the last three surveys are aggregated to give robust sub-samples for demographic and regional analyses. They collect data about Wills and charitable bequests, spontaneous and prompted awareness of about thirty major charities, likelihood to give and perceived effectiveness data for a few selected charities, preferences in methods of helping charities and newspaper readerships.For some years the RNLI have allowed Andrew Papworth to syndicate the general data from the Charity Monitor to other charities at about a quarter of the cost of going it alone at full market rates. So far, five major charities have subscribed to the data.last_img read more

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Philanthropy Ireland publishes new journal

first_img Howard Lake | 31 March 2009 | News Philanthropy Ireland has published its new biannual journal which deals with a range of issues around foundation and big gift giving.This first edition includes perspectives on developments within philanthropy from Ireland and the UK through to the EU and the United States.It gives an update on the new Charities Act, which has just been signed into law in Ireland, discusses the role of wealth advisors in promoting philanthropy, highlights social entrepreneurship in Ireland and explores private investment in arts and culture.Perhaps inevitably, there is a particular focus on the current recession and its impact on philanthropy, the community and voluntary sector and other not-for-profit organisations.Copies of Philanthropy Scope can be downloaded from the organisation’s website.www.philanthropy.ie AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  25 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Philanthropy Ireland publishes new journal Tagged with: Giving/Philanthropy Ireland Research / statistics About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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500 women to strip off for charity

first_img Howard Lake | 13 May 2009 | News  21 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Five hundred women from north west Ireland are to have a skinny dip to raise money for the Irish Cancer Society.The organisers of the country’s first en masse female skinny dip are calling on 500 Sligo women to strip off to raise money for breast cancer research this summer.Event organisers have got the green light from the Irish Cancer Society and local authorities and the skinny dip will take place on Sunday, June 21 in Rosses Point in County Sligo. Organisers are looking for 500 women to raise €200 each (a total of €100,000) for the Irish Cancer Society to support breast cancer. Advertisement 500 women to strip off for charity Tagged with: Events Irelandcenter_img About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Speaking to the Sligo Weekender event coordinators Grainne Gilmartin of the Wine Street Wellness Centre and Maire Garvey said: “The event will be fantastic fun, and it’s a great challenge for women of all ages to get involved in. It will be a 100 per cent female event. Rest assured, there will be absolutely no men allowed on the day!”www.cancer.ie AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

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Government wants to make social investment part of the ‘mainstream’ funding environment

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Government wants to make social investment part of the ‘mainstream’ funding environment  71 total views,  1 views today Advertisement A fund aimed at making organisations “investment ready” for social ventures has been established by the Government as part of its new strategy to make social investment part of the “mainstream” of voluntary sector funding.Announced last week, the new £60m fund will support social ventures that have high potential but “struggle to access finance”.Funded through loan repayments to the Futurebuilders Fund, the new fund will be based on the Cabinet Office’s £10m investment for Contract Readiness Fund. The new fund was announced in the government’s 2014 progress report on growing the social investment market, which outlines its news strategy to support social investment.“We know that more needs to be done to help… investment reach the frontline,” Nick Hurd, the minister for civil society, says in the report. “One of the key strands of our strategy for the next year will be Government playing its part by securing funds for investment readiness support over the next decade.“Over the past five years we have seen vision turn to reality. The aim of the next year is to turn reality to mainstream.”Other proposals in the strategy include:[list type=”check”]Pilot a guarantee fund to support crowdfunded social investment alongside an evaluation study to into the effectiveness of credit enhancements in the social sectorRe-assess financial promotion rules as they currently apply to social investmentsExplore how institutional investors – particularly pension and insurance funds – can more easily participate in social investmentEnlarge the Social Investment Tax Relief Scheme by seeking state aid clearance of a larger scheme, consulting on options for indirect investment and accrediting social impact bonds.Open up new markets through awareness and marketing campaigns and events to promote the effectiveness of social investment.[/list] Howard Lake | 23 June 2014 | Newscenter_img Tagged with: Funding social finance  72 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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Remember A Charity publishes response to Inheritance Tax Review

first_img  104 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis9  103 total views,  1 views today Melanie May | 14 June 2018 | News Remember A Charity publishes response to Inheritance Tax Review Tagged with: legacies Remember a Charity taxcenter_img Legacy consortium Remember A Charity, has submitted its response to the government’s Inheritance Tax Review, urging any changes to continue encouraging and supporting gifts in wills.Public consultation closed on 8 June, and Remember A Charity has now published its consultation submission. Its response highlights the importance of legacy income and inheritance tax (IHT) relief to charities, with legacy income the largest single source of voluntary income to the sector, generating over £3 billion each year. Current tax relief rules means that any legacy gift to charity is currently exempt from IHT (charged at 40%) and a lower rate of tax (36%) is applicable on estates where 10% or more is donated.Its response is supported by the Institute of Fundraising and the National Council for Voluntary Organisations and includes three recommendations:That any review of IHT and attempts to ‘simplify’ the system should take into account the impact on charitable gifts in wills, and avoid any potential negative consequencesThat any possibilities of simplification that could help to achieve the shared civil society and Government objective of increasing gifts in wills are sought and taken forward wherever possible (for example by considering introducing a tax incentive for everyone who leaves a charitable gift)That this review around any potential changes to IHT fully take into consideration the future work of the Charity Tax Commission (established by NCVO to undertake a full review of the charity tax system)Rob Cope, Director of Remember A Charity, said:“Tax relief should not be considered purely as a saving for the consumer or a cost to government, but as an opportunity to make a real difference to society for generations to come. The current inheritance tax framework encourages legacy giving and normalises conversation around what can still be seen by some as a taboo topic.“While IHT may need review, it is essential that any changes will continue to support and encourage gifts in wills. This could be a vital next step towards making the UK the first country in the world where legacy giving is the social norm.” Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis9 About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

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Inner Mongolian cyber-dissident often beaten, famous human rights lawyer still missing

first_img News China’s Cyber ​​Censorship Figures Democracies need “reciprocity mechanism” to combat propaganda by authoritarian regimes Help by sharing this information Reporters Without Borders is shocked to learn that the writer, human rights activist and cyber-dissident Govruud Huuchinhuu is often beaten by police in Tongliao (通辽, in Inner Mongolia), where she is reportedly under house arrest. This is the first news of Huuchinhuu since 27 January, when she left the Tongliao hospital where she had been treated for cancer.“We call for a full investigation into this case,” Reporters Without Borders said. “Those responsible for this violence must be punished and Huuchinhuu must be granted a proper release. We also call on the government to stop the use of enforced disappearance and house arrest for persons it claims to have released.”The information about Huuchinhuu was provided by the Southern Mongolian Human Rights Information Centre (SMHRIC), which received photos and documents dating back to 20-30 July showing that she had been beaten several times by police officers. RSF_en October 3, 2011 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Inner Mongolian cyber-dissident often beaten, famous human rights lawyer still missing April 27, 2021 Find out more China: Political commentator sentenced to eight months in prison Organisation News ChinaAsia – Pacific center_img to go further Huuchinhuu wrote many essays criticizing the Chinese government’s ethnic policies in Inner Mongolia. She was also active online and used to edit three websites – www.nutuge.com, www.ehoron.com and www.mongolger.net – which were closed by the authorities. Prior to being hospitalized, she had been under house arrest since November 2010.Enforced disappearance and mistreatment has become common in China. Details about the mistreatment of Gao Zhisheng, a famous human rights lawyer who has been missing since April 2010, were provided by his wife, Geng He, in a speech delivered to the Global Summit against Discrimination and Persecution in New York City on 21 September.After describing him as a lawyer who had “wholeheartedly served the people” only to be “brutally persecuted” by Chinese communist authorities, she gave a detailed account of how he was tortured in 2007: “When Gao was abducted on 21 September 2007, he suffered shockingly cruel torture by Chinese communist police. Six to seven policemen covered his head with a black hood and took him into a room, where they stripped off all his clothes and beat him fiercely. Immediately after the beating, four police used four electric batons to shock him all over his body, specifically his private parts. Gao shivered and trembled from excruciating pain, sweating profusely, and rolling on the floor in unbearable pain. The repeated shocks continued for several hours. Gao passed out many times, and was on the verge of death.“The next morning, they used five cigarettes to blow smoke into Gao’s nose and eyes, and stabbed his private parts with tooth picks. They tortured him in different kinds of ways until the afternoon if the third day. At that time, Gao struggled to get away from them. He called out our two children’s names loudly, and at the same time banged his head into the desk, trying to commit suicide to end the pain. His eyes and head were severely injured, with blood covering his entire face. Gao asked the police to lock him up in the prison, but the police replied: ‘You are simply dreaming if you want to go to prison. We can make you disappear whenever we want to’.” News June 2, 2021 Find out more News In 2006, Gao was given a suspended sentence of three years in prison, plus five years of probation and year of deprivation of rights. According to Geng, who fled the country with her children in 2009, Gao disappeared more than six times during this five-year period of probation. At the end of her speech, Geng appealed to the international community and international media to make human rights a priority and to put pressure on China to free her husband.The Chinese authorities have meanwhile drafted legislation that would legalize enforced disappearance. According to the New York Times : “The proposed revision would allow them to imprison in a secret location anyone (…) found to hinder an investigation. Suspects’ families would have to be told of their disappearance within 24 hours – unless doing so would hinder the investigation of crimes involving national security or terrorism.” Follow the news on China Receive email alerts ChinaAsia – Pacific March 12, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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Forestry group claims growth is being thwarted by regulations

first_img Forestry group claims growth is being thwarted by regulations RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Google+ Facebook By News Highland – April 1, 2011 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan fire 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Facebook WhatsApp Twittercenter_img Pinterest The government is being urged to lift restrictions on the planting of private forests, with the Donegal Woodland Owners Society seeking an urgent meeting with the Agriculture Minister Simon Coveney.Chairperson John Jackson says the level of afforestation in Donegal in recent years has crashed from over 6000 acres planted in 1995 to under 500 acres per year, but now, he claims, vast areas of land in Donegal, with proven high growth rates have been barred from afforestation on very dubious grounds.John Jackson says jobs can be created by doubling Ireland’s forestry cover, but the state must act now……..[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/jjack1pm.mp3[/podcast] Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Newsx Adverts Previous articleAnother year on year increase in Donegal’s Live Register figureNext articleOld Letterkenny Garda Station number no longer valid News Highland Google+ Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry WhatsApp Twitter Pinterestlast_img read more

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