George Washington CSG Ends Three-Month Patrol

first_img August 8, 2014 View post tag: Ends Authorities George Washington CSG Ends Three-Month Patrol Share this article GWCSG conducted four goodwill port visits and participated in a trilateral naval field training exercise with Indian navy and Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force during Malabar 2014.The strike group conducted goodwill port visits to Hong Kong, Singapore, Republic of Korea and Sasebo, Japan where Sailors interacted with foreign nationals through sporting events, cultural Morale, Welfare and Recreation events and community relations (COMREL) projects.George Washington successfully completed Core I and II training assessments to evaluate the carrier’s watch standers in requisite warfare areas of damage control, navigation and medical response.George Washington also hosted distinguished visitors, conducted numerous replenishments-at-sea and had a chance to relax to celebrate Independence Day and the ship’s birthday with a steel beach picnic on the flight deck.GWCSG ships finished up the patrol by hosting friends and family members for a Tiger Cruise where they had a chance to watch a sea and air power demonstration, damage control olympics and participate in ship tours to experience at-sea life aboard a Navy warship.GWCSG ships will now enter a maintenance availability to increase their material readiness and prepare for another upcoming patrol.Ships currently in the GWCSG include the flagship, George Washington and its embarked air wing, Carrier Air Wing 5, Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Shiloh (CG 67), and Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers USS John S. McCain (DDG 56) and USS Stethem (DDG 63).GWSCG is forward-deployed in the 7th Fleet area of operations supporting the security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region.[mappress]Press Release, August 08, 2014; Image: Wikimedia View post tag: Naval View post tag: CSG Back to overview,Home naval-today George Washington CSG Ends Three-Month Patrol View post tag: George Washingtoncenter_img View post tag: News by topic View post tag: asia View post tag: three George Washington Carrier Strike Group (GWCSG) returned to its forward-operating location at Fleet Activities Yokosuka Aug. 8, after completing a three-month patrol of the 7th Fleet area of operations. View post tag: Navy View post tag: americas View post tag: Patrol View post tag: monthlast_img read more

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Bidders submit proposals for Canadian frigate program

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today Bidders submit final proposals for Canadian Surface Combatant program View post tag: CSC Three teams of bidders have submitted their final proposals for the construction of a fleet of new frigates for the Royal Canadian Navy under the Canadian Surface Combatant Program.The companies received feedback to revise their proposals in May and the deadline for the final bids to be submitted was Friday last week.A total of 15 CSC ships are expected to be built by Irving Shipbuilding as prime contractor. The government expects to spend between CA$55 billion and 60 billion on the program but a more specific figure will be known once companies submit their reviewed financial bids, which were also due Friday.Canada’s Combat Ship Team – composed of Lockheed Martin, BAE Systems and CAE, MDA, L3 Technologies, and Ultra Electronics – submitted their proposal based on the Type 26 Global Combat Ship which was recently selected by Australia as the preferred design for a multi-billion dollar frigate construction program.“With the UK Type 26 program running ahead of CSC, our Canadian ship will benefit from lessons learned on the UK and Australian programs,” said Anne Healey, BAE Systems country director, Canada.“Canadian companies such as W.R. Davis Engineering in Ottawa, Rolls-Royce in Peterborough and L3 MAPPS in Montréal have already begun work on delivering high-technology systems for the UK’s Type 26, demonstrating the skills and capability available from the Canadian supply chain.”One of the other two bidders is the Alion Science and Technology-led team with a proposal based on the De Zeven Provinciën Air Defence and Command frigate which is in service with the Dutch Navy.“Each decision we made for equipment selection and systems integration focused on delivering cost-effective solutions that meet the requirements while delivering robust Canadian content,” Bruce Samuelsen, chief operating officer for Alion, said in December 2017 when Alion announced its participation in the program. “Many original system suppliers are building systems in Canada, but our combat system partners are actually creating manufacturing jobs for Canadians.”The third bidder is Spanish Navantia with its F-105 frigate design. The company will partner with Saab and CEA Technologies to deliver the ships should it be selected.Italian shipbuilder Fincantieri tried to seal the deal with its FREMM frigate design in an offer outside the tendering process. Fincantieri oferred to build 15 frigates for a fixed price of $30 billion but the government said it would not be accepting the “unsolicited proposal at the final hour”.The Canadian government and Irving Shipbuilding are scheduled to announce the winning proposals by the end of the year with construction starting in early 2020s. The surface combatants will be replacing Canada’s Iroquois-class destroyers and Halifax-class frigates. Authorities Bidders submit final proposals for Canadian Surface Combatant programcenter_img July 23, 2018 View post tag: Royal Canadian Navy Share this articlelast_img read more

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Mr. Mature America Pageant Set For This Saturday

first_imgRay Hufnagel, 84, of Somers Point, is a self-taught artist. He is an Army veteran, computer specialist, independent management and marketing consultant. As a youth, he played basketball against such greats as Tom Gola, Ernie Beck and Meadowlark Lemon. Andrew Dowling, 64, of Ventnor City, will read his original poetry. He has a unique hobby of creating artwork from junk and broken things. He enjoys anonymously helping people who have less than he has. Contestants include Dr. John Phillips, 72, of Somers Point, a life-long educator and martial arts champion who will break wood on stage. A winner of the International Karate Martial Artist of the Year title, he has also been honored for his work as an educator and for charitable and public service work. Thomas McGill, 68, of Ocean City, will perform stand-up comedy. He is past president of the Ocean City Exchange Club and has coached Little League baseball. His hobbies are biking, walking and collecting antiques. THE OCEAN CITY FREE PUBLIC LIBRARY continues to offer an array of stimulating programs and free entertainment: Peter M. Sposato, 73, is a singer from Toms River. He performs ballads at variety clubs, is an avid cycler and works out at the gym. He believes that keeping physically and mentally active adds to one’s quality of life. Mr. Mature America Inspiration Awards will be presented to Shriver’s Boardwalk legend Hank Glaser and former TV reporter and anchorman Dick Sheeran. Tickets are available by calling (609) 399-6111 or by stopping at the City Hall Welcome Center, 9th St. entrance. Tickets are also available at the door.TWO NEW EVENTS FOR APRIL (April 9-10):GIRLS WEEKEND on downtown Asbury Avenue will take place between 6th and 14th Sts. on Asbury Ave. There will be dining offers, spa specials, shopping discounts, yoga and wellness classes, craft projects and demonstrations, hotel and B&B packages and grand prize drawings.A Friday Night Fashion Show Kick-Off at Crown Bank, 801 Asbury Ave., is set for April 8 at 7 p.m. Light fare and refreshments, $20 a person, limited seating. For more information, call (609) 399-1412 or visit www.oceancityvacation.com.OC CON 2016, a weekend devoted to the comics, is also set for April 9-10. Visitors will be able to meet the creators of super heroes and comic book characters at the Music Pier. Stop by Sunday at 2 p.m. to see or participate in a costume contest.Events begin on Sat., April 9th at 9 a.m. with a one-mile Super Hero Run followed by a Super Hero Obstacle dash at noon. Contestants are encouraged to compete in costumes. Register at www.ocnj.us/Race-Events. (March 13) A TRIBUTE TO OUR WOMEN’S MILITARY SERVICE: The Library will host a film screening of a documentary by award-winning Ron Howard that tells first-hand stories of female veterans in the U.S. Military. The screening from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. will be followed by a discussion panel. Veterans are encouraged to participate. Light refreshments will be provided.center_img Bob D’amore, 65, a piano player and vocalist, performs in area venues and accompanies the St. James AME Gospel Chorus. He has worked with prominent entertainers over the years. Special guest performers will be Rock and Roll Hall of Fame drummer Dick Richards with his Ready Rockers band; blues great Bubba Mac; the St. James AME Combined Gospel Chorus; Sheri McGhie, Ms. Senior America; and Nancy Fox, talented soprano. Show will be held Sat. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sun. 10 .m. to 4 p.m. One-day admission, Adults $5, Children $2; Two-day admission, $8 for adults, $3 for children (12 and under).CALLING ALL DOO DAHERS: The 31st Annual DooDah Parade is set for Sat., April 16 at noon. Parade starts at 6th and Asbury Ave, proceeds to the Boardwalk at 14th St. and ends at the Music Pier. There will be an awards ceremony followed by the annual PieAsco honoring the memory of Soupy Sales, a great friend of Doo Dah. Folks sit in grandstands and then smoosh each other with shaving cream pies, the kind Soupy used on his syndicated TV show.To enter the Parade as an individual or a group access http://www.ocnj.us/doo-dah-parade/ or call (609) 399-6111 for more information. Rene Sese, 74, of Ocean City is a singer. He has performed in area casinos and countries throughout Asia. A native of the Philippines, he was instrumental in arranging Ocean City’s annual Philippine tribute. Gary Sakas, reigning Mr. Mature America, dances with last year’s contestants to “It’s Raining Men,” the opening number of the Pageant. This Saturday night, the spry seniors will dance to “Smooth” by Carlos Santana. The opening dance, choreographed by Jessica Albertson, sets the tone for an entertaining and amusing evening starting 7 p.m. at the Music Pier. Tickets are $10. Call 399-6111 or stop at the City Hall Welcome Center, 9 th and Asbury Ave. Tickets will also be available at the door.by Mark SoiferThe third annual Mr. Mature America Pageant will be held on Saturday, starting at 7 p.m. at the Ocean City Music Pier, Boardwalk and Moorlyn Terrace. The event is the only talent pageant for men 55 and older. It celebrates the talents, relevance and contributions of our senior citizens.The show will feature seven contestants and special performances by non- competing senior entertainers. There will be a display of senior art work in the solarium and Jerry Lukas, a renowned senior cartoonist, will create free, personalized cartoons for visitors. (March 16) ENVIRONMENTAL LECTURE: The City Environmental Commission in partnership with the Library continues its lecture series. The program will feature Randall Scheule speaking on the Ocean City Strategic Recovery Report, 6:30 p.m. in the Chris Maloney Lecture Hall. Lecture is free and open to public.For information on the many free educational and entertainment programs offered by the Library contact Julie at (609) 399-2434 x5222.last_img read more

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Become a barista

first_imgYou may ask yourselves, “Why should I move to quality coffee?” Compare the coffee industry to the wine industry and think back to when the UK drank very little wine – when our knowledge did not extend past drinking Blue Nun. Now, a lot of UK consumers have a basic understanding of different grape varieties and different wine-producing countries. Coffee has the same complexities and the consumer is becoming increasingly aware of the subtle differences.There is still a long way to go before customers regularly demand particular bean varieties or growing regions, but they are already voting with their feet and going to the place where the coffee tastes best. To compete, you need to reflect the standards of your food products with the standard of your coffee, and that’s where training comes in.I have no great problem with instant coffee – it has its place. But that place is no longer in a café, sandwich shop or bakery. I sometimes highlight the difference between instant and fresh coffee by comparing it to orange squash and freshly squeezed orange juice; I don’t expect to find orange squash for breakfast in a hotel.If you go towards espresso-based drinks, you will need to give your team some barista training. The word barista stems from the Italian for ’bartender’, the original experts on the espresso machine. People often assume it will take months to train a barista. But training traditional barista skills should not take a great deal of effort. A one-day course for your key staff should provide the main skills required, backed up with a half-day of training for more casual users.Key staff will need to know how to calibrate the machine and grinder to produce great espresso – as most poor coffee in this country stems from badly calibrated equipment – although all staff will need the straightforward steps to making espresso and foaming milk. Make sure you gain professional training, though; an hour of training from the engineer who installs the machine, or a member of your team who claims to have “used one before” may just generate bad habits that will be hard to shift. Some of the main coffee roasters and machine manufacturers can now offer professional training, or seek advice from independent trainers. Good trainers should also advise you on speed of service, maintaining your equipment and appropriate menu items, as well as providing training notes that future staff can utilise.A common fear is that your staff turnover may suggest that any training done will be a waste. The skills involved in preparing quality coffee can add to job satisfaction, particularly with the addition of skills like latte art (the patterns poured with the milk on the coffee), and can help with staff retention. But when staff do leave, you will need a system for training new starters. Build in the required barista skills into your induction programme for new starters. Your key staff, who had more intensive training, should be able to give on-the-job training for the new starters, perhaps assisted by some training notes provided from your barista training company. Once a year, you could have another day of structured training to maintain skills and iron out bad habits.Finally, set up a coffee ’audit’ system, which checks that all your team are producing drinks to the required standard. This could be done formally or run as a competition for more fun and encouragement.* Paul Meikle-Janney is managing director of barista trainers Coffee Community—-=== Training options ===It can cost anything from between £300 to £500 per day (plus VAT and expenses) to hire a trainer for a day, who could train your whole team. Alternatively, a course for an individual will cost around £125 to £150 per day. People should look at the training company’s track record, facilities and support materials to get full value, as the cheapest is not always the best.Once the basic skills have been adopted, you may wish to extend the training and gain a deeper knowledge of the varieties of coffee available and perhaps teach your team latte art (the patterns poured with the milk on the coffee).It is also possible to gain formal qualifications in barista skills now. Trade organisation the Speciality Coffee Association of Europe (www.scae.com) runs barista certification, and City & Guilds and NCFE have created VRQ qualifications in barista skills that can be taken at college.Coffee Community: [http://www.coffeecommunity.co.uk]The London School of Coffee: [http://www.londonschoolofcoffee.com]Speciality Coffee Association of Europe: [http://www.scae.com]Absolute coffee: [http://www.absolutecoffee.co.uk]last_img read more

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Rewarding innovation in inclusion

first_imgAn open-access online portal of anti-racism policy research publications.A pilot project to replace the prevalent anatomical representation of the human body (young, lean, white, and male) by collecting and generating anatomical images of all human forms.A map of inclusive symbols and spaces on campus.Those are just three of the proposals that will receive 2020‒21 grants from the Harvard Culture Lab Innovation Fund (HCLIF), which awards up to $15,000 to projects that expand welcome and support to all at Harvard. The fund is part of the Office for Diversity, Inclusion & Belonging, led by John Silvanus Wilson, senior adviser and strategist to President Larry Bacow.In a statement, Wilson called the wining projects “exceptional solutions to advance diversity and a culture of belonging on our campus.”“During these difficult times our hope is that these projects will contribute to creating a brighter future,” said Wilson. “These innovative solutions address the needs of some of our most vulnerable community members, including undocumented students, students with disabilities, LGBTQ community members, first generation/low-income students, racial minorities, and marginalized genders.”“During these difficult times our hope is that these projects will contribute to creating a brighter future,” said John Silvanus Wilson, senior adviser and strategist to President Larry Bacow. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard file photoWilson’s office works to foster a culture of inclusion and belonging to help the University become “a much better community.” The lab innovation fund is designed to invite and invest in creative ideas from the entire campus community. Students, faculty, staff, postdoctoral researchers and academic personnel are eligible to apply.“Harvard University recently made a choice to steadily and deliberately evolve our campus culture toward one that will help to ensure that everyone in our community thrives,” said Wilson. “We are pursuing what we call ‘sustainable inclusive excellence.’”Wilson said that the winning projects showed a “strong alignment with the goals from the 2018 report of the Presidential Task Force on Inclusion and Belonging” and “add recognizable value to our pursuit of sustainable inclusive excellence.The fund received 98 applications from Harvard Community members, and held two rounds of judging by review committees that included students, staff, and faculty.This year’s grant recipientsA Walk in My Shoes: Fostering Empathy for Gender Diversity Across Harvard. A project designed to disarm unconscious bias surrounding gender identity. Nicolas Freeman, Harvard Medical SchoolAddressing Bias in Medical Education through Inclusive Anatomical Representation. A pioneering pilot to replace the predominant anatomical representation of the human body by collecting and generating anatomical images of all human forms. Dana A Stearns, Director of Anatomy Education, Pathways Curriculum, HMSHarvard H.U.B. A plan to harness the power of technology and storytelling to connect undergraduate students to a myriad of campus resources. Nidhi Patel, Harvard CollegeMap of Inclusive Symbols and Spaces (MISS). An interactive web app that visualizes spaces around campus and gives information about their symbols (e.g., public art honoring social justice leaders) and names. Anisha Asundi, Research Fellow: Gender Specialist, Harvard Kennedy School (HKS)NextGen Initiative. A multiplatform initiative that aims to enhance the experience of all students who are the first in their families to pursue an undergraduate or graduate degree in the U.S. Amanda Sharick, Senior Program Manager, Graduate Commons Program, Central Administration (CADM)Race Research and Policy Portal. An online portal of evidence-based research and publications on policy, practice, and organizational change as they relate to racism, racial equity, and anti- racism. Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Professor of History, Race and Public Policy, HKSSySTEMatic: Expanding the Reach of Diversity in STEM Programming through Enhanced Mentorship Tech. A collaborative effort to implement mentoring software to aggregate opportunities and streamline efforts to strengthen the impact and expand the reach of STEM mentorship programs at Harvard. Deidre Schreiber, Senior IT Academy Training Program Manager, Central Administration/Harvard University Information Technology. The Women+ of Color Project @ Harvard. WOC+ aims to improve the pipeline of under-represented racial minority women who pursue graduate school in the physical sciences at Harvard. Lanell Williams, Ph.D. Candidate in Physics at Harvard University, NSF Graduate Research Fellow, Graduate School of Arts and SciencesUndocuVeritas. A support hub for undocumented/DACAmented students across all Harvard Schools and campuses. Denisse Rojas Marquez, Graduate Student, HKSUniversal Design for Inclusive Research Labs. This pilot aims to increase the number of undergraduate students with disabilities in research labs and increase the implementation of Universal Design principles in existing and new research environments. Shelby Acteson, Associate Director University Disability Resources, Central Administration/Harvard Human Resources In addition to the 2020‒21 grant recipients, three past winners received scaling grants (for high-impact social ventures) to expand and sustain their efforts: the Harvard Votes Challenge, a nonpartisan initiative to increase student voter registration and participation; the [Diversity, Equity, Inclusion and Belonging]  DEIB Personalized Learning Project, which provides resources for members of the University community to develop their DEIB skills; and Teachly, a web app that provides teachers with data-driven insights on their students’ classroom participation.Check dib.harvard.edu/hclif to view video pitches from the winning teams.last_img read more

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Social Work Club looks to expand outreach

first_imgSaint Mary’s Social Work Club may include students from the College, but the group’s mission involves stepping away from campus.Club president and senior Marilla Opra said the club will provide members with the opportunity to become immersed in the South Bend community.“Our goal is to promote social work values in the service opportunities that we do both on- and off-campus,” Opra said. “We hope to give people the chance to serve while connecting with social work ethics.”Students have much to learn from the surrounding area, explained Opra.“I think it’s good for us to actually be involved and get acclimated to the community around us because the city of South Bend really is an up-and-coming city, and there are so many great organizations to be part of … instead of just focusing on what happens on campus.”This year, the club will participate in several service projects, such as working with residents of La Casa de Amistad, a local organization that empowers the Latino community through education and childcare in a bilingual atmosphere.“They’ve also been talking to us about possibly working with them in their English learning program and after school tutoring center,” Opra said. “We’re also working to adopt a family for Christmas.”This year, the club is changing its focus and making strides to communicate ethics and awareness of social work to other majors too, said club vice president and senior Jessica Ladd. The club’s service aligns with the College’s emphasis on justice, Ladd said.“President Cervelli’s core value for this year is justice, so … going out into the community and really working at integrating students is perfect to promote the value of justice that she’s focusing on,” Ladd said. Treasurer and senior Kelly Geelan said the club accomodates a wide range of interests and has a place for everyone.“We’re kind of restructuring the club, so it can fit all different interests,” she said. “We’re going to have different communities that focus on specific things that we’re addressing in the club and have fundraising committees to work on raising all the money that we donate to the charities we use for our events. Campus outreach, [which] focuses more on things we do on campus like advertising and contacting the Notre Dame, Saint Mary’s and Holy Cross communities, and community outreach are the people that will be personally in contact with agencies we want to work with … whatever your interest is, there’s a section for you.”According to Geelan, social work fosters empathy.“The people that you’re interacting with most of the time aren’t in the best circumstances or the best time in their lives, but just your presence being there already makes it better,” she said.Opra said on-campus involvement remains an important component of the club, however.“On campus, we’re working with BAVO [Belle’s Against Violence Office] to sponsor Green Dot training and with the Student Diversity Board to work on some cultural sensitivity training,” she said.Ladd said the club allows members to connect with the South Bend community and beyond. She said she hopes the service the club does will initiate the development of an increasingly sensitive and compassionate environment.“It’s just all about helping people,” Ladd said. “I speak for all of us when I say: ‘you’re always making a difference in someone’s life, and it’s a positive one. You’re always looking for a better outcome, and so even the little things on campus that we’re doing can start here but go much bigger.’ That’s what we’re trying to push.” Social Work Club’s call meeting will take place Monday September 11 at 6:30 p.m. in 145 Spes Unica Hall.Tags: BAVO, Green Dot, social work, St. Margaret’s Houselast_img read more

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Nicaraguan Navy Sinks Drug Boat in Caribbean Sea

first_imgBy Dialogo July 24, 2012 The Nicaraguan Navy exchanged fire with four alleged drug traffickers in the Caribbean Sea, resulting in one arrest and the burning and subsequent sinking of the vessel on which they were traveling, the Army announced on July 22. The alleged trafficker, Florentino Solís, is a native of Laguna de Perlas, located in the South Atlantic Autonomous Region (RAAS), was arrested while three other, unidentified members of the vessel’s crew succeeded in escaping, according to a statement by the armed service. The incident took place between the night of July 21 and early morning of July 22, six nautical miles northeast of the Miskito community of Wounta, in the jurisdiction of the RAAS, the announcement said. The Navy patrol detected the intruder vessel and pursued it and its occupants, who upon seeing that they had been discovered, fired at the officers, leading to an exchange of fire in which no casualties or damage on the Military side were reported, the announcement added. Authorities assume that the vessel was transporting drugs and fuel, and that as a result of the exchange of fire, the boat caught on fire, and its occupants jumped overboard and fled, except for Solís. Navy divers are searching the area where the drug vessel sank in order to learn more about the cargo this boat was carrying, the statement said.last_img read more

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Fed heeds NAFCU’s call to eliminate Reg D transaction limit

first_img continue reading » The Federal Reserve Friday issued an interim final rule to amend Regulation D and remove the six-per-month transaction limit on transferring between savings and checking accounts. NAFCU has long recommended that it be eliminated.“NAFCU has long advocated for the Federal Reserve to lift its six-per-month transaction limit on consumers’ savings accounts,” said NAFCU President and CEO Dan Berger. “As the coronavirus pandemic exacerbates longstanding concerns with the transaction limit, it is important consumers have the flexibility they need to freely transfer essential funds between their accounts to cover everyday expenses and manage their personal finances. NAFCU appreciates the Fed’s decision to amend the rule and keeping it permanently in place would give consumers greater control over their finances.”The Fed’s announcement indicates the interim final rule “allows depository institutions immediately to suspend enforcement of the six transfer limit and to allow their customers to make an unlimited number of convenient transfers and withdrawals from their savings deposits at a time when financial events associated with the coronavirus pandemic have made such access more urgent.” ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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No elective surgeries makes life a struggle for some

first_imgWith the surgery put on hold, Pickering said her “everyday life has been heavily affected.” In what she calls “a life changing month,” Picking said she is getting by one day at a time. “Basically I can’t do anything,” she says. “I can’t hold a pen, I can’t hold a fork, I can’t hold a glass, I can’t do anything and it’s making me become a left handed person.” Now, recovering nicely in her home, Pickering said it could definitely be worse. Two years ago, Angel Pickering suffered a hand and wrist injury that required a series of surgeries. Pickering no choice but to adjust to life without the use of her right hand. Pickering tells 12 News was scheduled to have part of his hand “fixed” in March. On top of it all, Pickering’s wrist isn’t the only thing that has gotten in her way. “I’m right handed, my wrist now doesn’t work and the rest of my fingers are beginning to not work,” Pickering told 12 News. “Not many people walked out of that hospital after a month so I am thankful,” she says. Pickering said she doesn’t know when her surgery will come. She also says she was on of the first COVID-19 patients. BINGHAMTON (WBNG) — Governor Andrew Cuomo announced Tuesday elective surgeries will be allowed in some parts of New York State. For some, elective surgeries are turning necessary with every day that goes by. “Like” Jacob Seus on Facebook and “Follow” him on Twitter.last_img read more

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You don’t have to sacrifice having a garden with these homes

first_img36 Warana St, The Gap. Picture: realestate.com.auIt is listed for $549,000 through David Havig of Havig & Jackson — Clayfield.It is in an elevated position and has a leafy outlook which extends down the street and towards the surrounding hills. There are three bedrooms, open-plan living areas and a generous backyard with a level playing area. 15 Lunar Place, Bridgeman Downs. Picture: realestate.com.auThe five-bedroom home is for sale through Samantha Foster of Place — Aspley.The home is on 1580sq m and has leafy urban views. It is framed by established, landscaped gardens, with a native garden at the front of the home and tropical plants surrounding the pool.At the more affordable end of the market is 36 Warana St, The Gap. 753C Clear Mountain Rd, Clear Mountain. Picture: realestate.com.auGrowing populations and higher density living mean more families are growing up without their own garden.While inner-city living can be great, it’s a bit tough having an Easter egg hunt without a garden to do it in.This week we look at three properties, from high end to cheap and cheerful, which would be perfect for an Easter hunt and other games.There is plenty of room to hide an egg — or dozen — at a home at 753C Clear Mountain Rd, Clear Mountain.The four-bedroom home is listed for $3.79 million.center_img Plenty of yard at this Clear Mountain Rd, home. Picture: realestate.com.auIt has four bathrooms, parking space for 11 cars and is listed through Bryan Carmichael of Denovans Real Estate — Mitchelton. Described as a luxury acreage retreat, the home is on 1.06ha of landscaped grounds — plenty of hiding spaces there — and overlooks Lake Samsonvale, North Pine Dam and out to Moreton Bay beyond.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home6 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor6 hours agoThere are formal and informal living areas, large bedrooms, a gym room, library and a dedicated media room on the top level which also has views.In the middle of the market is a home at 15 Lunar Place, Bridgeman Downs, listed for offers over $929,000.last_img read more

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