Vermont Communities in a Digital Age’ event February 16

first_imgThe e-Vermont Community Broadband Project is working across Vermont to help communities solve local issues with 21st century tools. On February 16 e-Vermont will host Vermont Communities in a Digital Age to highlight some of the projects taking place and bring leaders and learners together to share what they have discovered so far. Topics include mobilizing community resources during emergencies, a hands-on lab about digital tools for business, a showcase of how technology is expanding the classroom for 4-6th graders, and a preview of how town meetings can reach a wider audience. The all-day workshop takes place at Vermont Technical College in Randolph Center.‘‘High speed Internet is the critical resource of the 21st century for business, education, community building, good governance and communicating with friends and family. It touches on all parts of our lives,’ says e-Vermont Project Director Helen Labun Jordan. ‘But making the best use of this resource takes the kind of creative thinking we’ll be sharing on February 16.’ Labun Jordan notes that this workshop is for people who are comfortable with computers and focused on applying those skills to larger community goals, not on learning basic skills. Anne Galloway is the keynote speaker. Anne is an award-winning journalist and founder/editor of VTDigger.org, a statewide news website dedicated to coverage of Vermont politics, consumer affairs, business and public policy.Registration is only $20 and includes course offerings, refreshments and lunch. For a complete schedule and to pre-register online visit the e-Vermont website at www.e4vt.org(link is external), call 802-859-3090, or e-mail joanna@snellingcenter.org(link sends e-mail). Follow e-Vermont on Facebook (e-Vermont) and Twitter (@eVermont).e-Vermont partner The Snelling Center for Government is the lead organizer for Vermont Communities in a Digital Age.‘The whole day will offer participants new ideas about how digital tools can be used to create jobs, reinvent schools, attract visitors, improve civic involvement, and enliven Vermont communities,’ stated conference coordinator Joanna Cummings. ‘We hope that hearing directly from some of our communities about their projects will inspire other towns to adapt these tools for their unique needs.’The e-Vermont Community Broadband Project is led by the Vermont Council on Rural Development, and is made up of the Vermont State Colleges, the Vermont Department of Libraries, the Vermont Department of Public Service, Vermont Small Business Development Center, the Snelling Center for Government, Front Porch Forum, Digital Wish, Evslin Family Foundation and Vermont Community Foundation.e-Vermont is supported by a $2.5 million stimulus grant from the U.S. Department of Commerce. Additional support comes from the Evslin Family Foundation, Vermont Community Foundation, the Jan and David Blittersdorf Foundation, UVM’s Center for Rural Studies, the Vermont Rural Partnership and by donated services and equipment from Dell, Microsoft, and Comcast.last_img read more

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Crusaders to host El Dorado tonight; Duke wrestlers lose league opener; WMS scores; and weekend scheduleIn

first_imgJV Girls7:30 p.m. WHS WrestlingClearwater tournament by Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — The Wellington will be hosting El Dorado Friday night. The Crusader boys, 4-4, will be attempting to break a three-game losing streak against the Wildcats, who currently are 1-8 for the year. The Wellington girls, at 3-5, will be battling the Lady Cats, who are 3-6.The girls varsity starts at 6 p.m. with the boys following at about 7:30 p.m.In other news…Wellington wrestlers lose to Mulvane. The varsity Wellington wrestling team lost to Mulvane 48-34 in the opening of the Ark Valley Chisholm Trail League Div. IV dual season there Thursday eveningThe results are as follows:106 – Bush, Mulvane won by default.113 – Schmidt, Well. pinned Pollard, 2:30.120 – Mosses M pinned Wolf 5:34.126 – Houser M pinned Heacock, 1:04.132 – Brownley M won by default.138 – Scantin M pinned King 3:30.145 – DeJarnett W pinned Sutpkin 1:30.152 – Cusick M pinned Struble, :28.160 – Elliott M pinned Bodkins 1:00.170 – Ast W major dec. Benefiel 10-1.182 – Hauglen W pinned Dillon 4:45.195 – Fair W pinned Duncan 3:40.220 – Brand W pinned McElvray 1:53.Wellington Middle School scores:The following are scores from Thursday’s games against Clearwater:8A Boys – Wellington 49 Clearwater 28Joe Ybarra 24, Andres Lara 10, DeAndre Washington 8, Grey Hatfield 4, Jacob Ewing 2, Michael Ledbetter8B Boys – Wellington 38 Clearwater 20Chance Hamel 9, Caleb Reichenberger 6, Chi Barton 4, Dakota Dry 4, Julian Burden 4, Nichols 3, Adam Farley 2, Brayden Higginbotham 2, Andres Lara 2, Drake Hendrix 28A Girls – Wellington 33 Clearwater 11Adrienne Norris 8, Taylor Meyer 8, Jacelyn Buck 4, Taryn Stoddard 4, Kileigh Peninger 3, Carrie Nuss 2, Camryn Ricke 2, Delaney Parkey 28B Girls – Wellington 26 Clearwater 08Arielle Pottier 6, Carrie Nuss, 4, Camryn Ricke 4, Delaney Parkey 4, Kileigh Peninger 2, KayCee Pennington 2, Lyrik Williams 2, Savanna Ybarra 27A Boys – Wellington 40 Clearwater 21Silas Popplewell 16, Zander Vargas 14, Blake Rausch 6, Isaac Hilt 47A Girls – Wellington 37 Clearwater 18Lindsey Scheufler 18, McKenna Jones 8, Kennedee Lara 4, Kylie Aufdengarten 3, Tori Lewellen 2, Natalie Henning 2Schedule for this weekend: Belle PlaineDouglass , home South HavenFlinthills , home Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comment (1) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. 0 Vote up Vote down …… · 290 weeks ago Haydon pin at 182 thanks Report Reply 0 replies · active 290 weeks ago Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments SPORTS TEAMFri. Jan 16Sat. Jan. 17 Follow us on Twitter. WHS BasketballEl Dorado, home Varsity Girls6 p.m.center_img JV Boys6 p.m. Conway SpringsW. Independent , home ArgoniaCentral away C Boys4:15 p.m. OxfordElk Valley away WHS JV Wrestling Varsity Boys7:30 p.m. CaldwellCV-Dexter awaylast_img read more

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Labor of love: ‘The Capital of Basketball’ is wife’s lasting tribute to sportswriter John McNamara

first_imgMcNamara was close to finishing that project when he was murdered — one of five victims in the June 2018 mass shooting at the offices of the Capital Gazette newspaper in Annapolis, Md.“I guess for the two months after he died I couldn’t bring myself to go into his den,” Chamblee told Sporting News. “I kept the door closed. I shuddered when I walked past it. He should have been in there working on this book. He was every night when we were home and he wasn’t at a game.“But after about two months I opened the door and tried to remember what it was like when he was there. And the boxes of the files were so conspicuous to see in the middle of the floor — just boxes and boxes of microfiche that he had printed out and telephone numbers he had called. And there was a list of people that he wanted to call back pasted above his desk.“And I decided to take a look to see how far along he had gotten.”McNamara was a staff writer at the Annapolis paper at the time of his death, but his enthusiasm for sports was addressed most nights by wrapping himself in the history of D.C.-area high school basketball. The region long has been extraordinarily rich in basketball talent: Dave Bing, Austin Carr, Adrian Dantley, Victor Oladipo, Danny Ferry, Adrian Branch, Sidney Lowe, Sherman Douglas and Len Bias all were products of its high school teams. There is a listing of all-area teams near the back of “The Capital of Basketball,” starting in the 1920s and carrying forward to 2000, that is loaded with eventual All-Americans, NBA All-Stars and Naismith Hall of Famers.He expressed in the introduction to this book how, already an enormous fan of the NBA and colleges, he came to fall in love with the high school game by attending with his father a matchup of Archbishop Carroll and the private school he had entered, St. John’s. He was “hooked” for life.“In terms of value for your entertainment dollar,” McNamara wrote, “I still believe you can’t beat a good high school basketball game.”McNamara wrote a couple of books about the athletic program at Maryland, his alma mater, one each about football and basketball. Like many writers, he had in his mind a project or two he wanted to address when he found the time. He wanted to write about the history of D.C. high school hoops, but when he learned about the death of legendary coach Bob Dwyer, who had led Archbishop Carroll to 55 consecutive victories in the 1950s, McNamara told his wife he’d missed his chance. She knew better.Chamblee reminded McNamara that Hall-of-Famer Morgan Wootten of DeMatha Catholic and Joe Gallagher of St. John’s were among the elite coaches still around then, with lifetimes of stories to tell. She urged McNamara to contact them and collect their memories and, when the time came, to put it all on paper.“He had been working on it, and I had helped him back up those files, so I knew where they were,” Chamblee said. “He didn’t like me to read his works in progress, but I had put them on a thumb drive and on the cloud and then a few places, so that if we lost one we’d have other backups. I decided to search them out and download them and open them up.“He was so close to finishing. I thought I had to be able to do this for him and finish it.”With help from D.C. area sportswriter David Elfin, who had collaborated with McNamara on “Cole Classics! Maryland Basketball’s Leading Men and Moments,” Chamblee was able to complete the book in time for it to be published as the 2019-20 basketball season commenced.The idea of the book was to cover the 20th century, ending with Wootten’s induction into the Naismith Memorial Hall of Fame in 2000. He’d covered all but the final two years of the 1990s, and Chamblee said Elfin was an enormous help in addressing those seasons and proofreading the entire work. The opening chapter covering 1900-1950 was not yet done, but McNamara had so thoroughly outlined what he had planned, Chamblee said, “Really, all I had to do was turn his outline into complete sentences and write it the way he would want it to be written.”The completed work is a tribute to McNamara’s encyclopedic knowledge of the basketball scene in the D.C. metro area. It is published by Georgetown University Press. Academic houses often prefer the work they produce to have been peer-reviewed before publication. But no one could find a “peer” in this arena; McNamara was the authority.Chamblee is a former newspaper reporter who became an attorney and now works as senior regulatory counsel for the Food and Drug Administration. She was out of work, temporarily, during the government shutdown earlier this year, but that provided her time to finish her husband’s book project.“If the government hadn’t shut down for those six weeks, I don’t think we’d be talking about this book today,” she said. “I couldn’t take on another job — that’s not allowed — so I just worked 12-hour days finishing the book.”Some of what was required was identifying the subjects of photographs; McNamara didn’t always write them down because he’d have known them at a glance. Chamblee got some help from other writers and credited Wootten and Maryland basketball voice Johnny Holliday for being generous with their time in helping to assure accuracy. Hall of Fame coach Gary Williams, who coached at Maryland from 1989-2011, agreed to write the foreword, explaining he got to know McNamara on a professional level, “and then as a friend.” There is a special feeling for an author when the first copy of a book arrives, usually in the mail or by courier service. So many years of labor can go into such a project, and to hold it all in one’s hands is an extraordinary experience. Few, though, have felt anything like what Chamblee did when “The Capital of Basketball” was delivered to her.“I was so conflicted when I held that book in my hand,” Chamblee said. “Of course, these days you email off the files, so even just hitting the send button on the files felt like I was letting it go. Maybe it feels a little like a parent dropping their child off at college.“And when it came back, part of me wanted to keep it like this was my secret between John and I, and I didn’t want to share it. But certainly, I knew I needed to share it. John wanted people to know these stories, so I have to let it go.” For about two months, the last words John McNamara had to share with his readers — words that represented over a decade’s worth of research, conversation, investigation and, above all, passion — sat untouched in his office.In 2007, he began the project that would become “The Capital of Basketball” at the urging of his wife, Andrea Chamblee. She knew was no one was more qualified to write the history of the incredible high school basketball competition that has flourished for over a century in the Washington D.C. metro area.last_img read more

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