Carpenter leads without No. 2 teammate

first_imgAs a senior in her final year of play, Elizabeth Carpenter is at the No. 1 spot in the lineup, leading the Badgers into what is anticipated to be a very successful year for the University of Wisconsin’s women’s tennis team.However, a recent injury to the No. 2 player Alaina Trgovich has forced Carpenter to step up her game and fill the hole that was left when Trgovich tore her ACL, leaving her inactive.“Since we have a player that just went down with an injury, she’s going to have to fill that role all year,” coach Brian Fleishman said. “I think she’s ready to fill that void.”Trgovich is also doing the best she can to help Carpenter despite her injury. She knows that there is a lot she can do besides actually practicing with Carpenter.“I feel bad that I let her down and I can’t play with her,” said Trgovich, “I just try to motivate her and keep her focused, and I still want her to have a great last year.”So far, the team has been very successful, winning their last two matches 7-0 against Eastern Michigan and Northern Illinois with Carpenter in the lead spot. Nevertheless, playing without the team’s No. 2 player has made things a challenge for the senior.“It’s difficult to lose one of our best players, but I try to keep it off my mind.” Carpenter said of losing Trgovich. “It doesn’t change how I play, I still try to go out and do the best that I can.”Carpenter — who plays No. 1 singles and No. 1 doubles — provides support and experience for her team, and they all look to her for encouragement. She provides a framework for the team to model themselves after and Fleishman hasn’t overlooked her importance to the team both on and off the court.“She doesn’t really say a lot but she leads by example and works hard,” Fleishman said. “She shows everybody that she’s going to give the same effort every day, and on game day she has the most energy and everyone looks to her for a visual role model.”Carpenter led by example in last Friday’s win over the Northern Illinois Huskies. Carpenter won both of her singles sets 6-0 and finished 8-1 with her doubles partner, Angela Chupa.“She had a lot of energy this past Friday, and she knows she needs to step up a little bit more than she already has.” Trgovich said. “I think she did a really good job.”Although Carpenter is currently the top player on the UW roster, she hasn’t always been as successful as of late. According to Fleishman, hard work and her competitive spirit brought her to where she is today.“When I first came here, she couldn’t keep within two or three balls to play, and she’s come a long way in the year and a half since I’ve been coaching,” Fleishman said. “She’s got the biggest heart on the team and has the greatest work ethic.”Her love of tennis developed at a young age and grew into the passion she feels for the sport today. As a kid, she loved the challenge of taking on an opponent and playing her heart out.“When I was growing up, I played mostly individual and I liked going out and competing,” Carpenter said. “But now it’s a team, and I love having someone to play for and the team atmosphere out on the courts.”Now that Carpenter is a senior, she can look back over her collegiate career and learn from it. She has developed the skills she needs and knows how to prepare for each match and what works best for her.“I treat each practice as a game and give everything I have each time I go out on the court,” Carpenter said. “I live by the motto how you practice today is how you play each game and that helps me prepare for each match. Now that I’m a senior, I don’t take matches for granted and play at my best against each opponent.”last_img read more

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Syracuse makes too many mistakes to stick with No. 1 Florida State in 38-20 loss

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Just as quickly as Syracuse received a breath of life, it gave it right back.After pouncing on a mishandled punt, the Orange was set up at the Florida State 21-yard line with a chance to cut the Seminoles’ lead from 18 points to two scores.AJ Long, as steady as he’d been to that point of the game, reminded everyone he’s still a freshman. Facing pressure, he threw a pass that FSU’s Nate Andrews picked off and the Carrier Dome groaned as another scoring opportunity for SU was lost.The Orange did snap a string of 100-plus minutes without scoring a touchdown on Saturday afternoon, but it wasn’t enough. SU’s (2-4, 0-2 Atlantic Coast) youth took the team a step in the right direction, yet the recurrence of missed opportunities shot down any chance the Orange had of staging an upset in a 38-20 loss to the No. 1 Seminoles (6-0, 4-0).Florida State and Jameis Winston flexed their muscle and powered through SU for the victory, spoiling Tim Lester’s debut as SU offensive coordinator before a gathering of 43,295 in the Carrier Dome.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I really believed we could beat this team,” SU head coach Scott Shafer said, “and we didn’t get that done today.”But, considering all that’s happened in the last three weeks, the discussion of missed chances — and not embarrassment at the hands of the nation’s top-ranked team — is a positive in itself.After Austin Wilson threw an interception on SU’s first drive, the Orange settled for a field goal after three failed attempts at the end zone from inside the 10 on Long’s first collegiate drive under center. On the first play of the next drive, Durell Eskridge dropped an interception on a deep ball from Winston, who then made SU pay by leading the Seminoles down the field for a 17-3 edge.“You can put them up against anyone,” SU cornerback Julian Whigham said.Midway through the second quarter, the Orange pounced on a fumble inside the 20, but again settles for a field goal. SU then marched inside the 10 right before the break, but came away with nothing and the Seminoles led 24-6 heading into the half.“We’ve just got to keep working on it,” left tackle Sean Hickey said. “I sound like a broken record, but it’s what you have to do.”By halftime, it had been more than 95 minutes of game time since Syracuse’s offense had finished a drive with a touchdown. Lester’s reign as offensive coordinator had yet to resolve that issue. The bend of the Orange’s defense was on the verge of breaking against Winston, who orchestrated another lengthy drive to pile on more points on FSU’s first possession of the second half. Then, momentum slowly churned in SU’s direction.The Orange finally struck gold on offense with a well-placed, 22-yard touchdown pass from Long to fellow freshman Steve Ishmael. After that, the SU defense forced a three-and-out to get the ball back.But on the Orange’s next possession, Long’s inexperience got the best of him as he threw the interception to Andrews. He and Ishmael would link up again for a touchdown to draw the score to 38-20, but a few more missed chances in the second half kept SU at that length.Cornerback Brandon Reddish got his hands on a would-be interception three plays before Winston threw his third touchdown pass of the day. Winston later fumbled from the pocket, but SU couldn’t run it down. Long, hit as he threw, tossed an interception with five minutes left that sent fans to the exits.Shafer doesn’t believe in moral victories. Hickey can’t accept them, either.But looking at how the Seminoles dismantled the Orange, 59-3, last year and how the past three weeks have transpired, Hickey found a bit of solace in progress.“It’s a step in the right direction,” Hickey said. “Last year, we felt like we didn’t get that respect because we didn’t deserve it. We got destroyed. “And this year we wanted to make them earn the win and earn some respect and I felt we did that.” Comments Published on October 11, 2014 at 3:44 pm Contact Phil: pmdabbra@syr.edu | @PhilDAbblast_img read more

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