In Your Neighbourhood

first_imgMile Gully, Ricam lead Manchester Major League Following the completion of the first half of the first round, Mile Gully and Ricam are the respective zone leaders of the Magnum/Captain’s Bakery Major League. Mile Gully’s 2-0 win over Greenvale pivoted them to 13 points from five games to head Zone One ahead of defending champions Hillstars, who have 12. Mile Gully had to fight off relegation in their penultimate match last season. However, their resurgence this season has been remarkable and included the highlight of the competition so far – a 1-0 win over Hillstars in the fourth round. That win spoilt Hillstars’ unbeaten record, which dates back to the 2014 season. Ricam leads Zone Two with 13 points after five matches, which includes four wins and a draw against Alligator Pond. They completed the pre-Christmas round with a 6-0 win over Land Settlement. Christopher Dyer netted a hat-trick, the third time the feat had been achieved since the start of the competition last month. Downs are second with 12 points, having lost to Ricam. The competition takes a break until Saturday, January 2. Hillstars, Ricam to contest Manchester KO finals The first finals of the 2015-16 Manchester FA season will be contested next Tuesday when Hillstars and Ricam meet in the Brumalia Hardware-sponsored Knock-out Cup. Venue will be Brooks Park, starting at 2:45 p.m. Both teams earned the right following convincing semi-finals performances. Hillstars recorded a 3-1 win over Old England, while defending champions Porus were brushed aside 6-0 by Ricam. That result has since sent Porus in a spin, so much so that they failed to show for their fifth-round Major League fixture against Alligator Pond. Ricam are in their best form, currently unbeaten and leading Zone Two of the Major League. Hillstars are in second position in another Major League zone, but are still fancied to win the KO finals despite a recent 0-1 upset loss to Mile Gully. Henriques wins ‘Rappa Pam Pam’ Despite being noticeably injured, Mandeville’s top shooter, Orville Henriques, held off the challenge of Jamaica Rifle Association’s Lennox Moulton to win the Manchester Rifle and Pistol Club’s Christmas extravaganza dubbed ‘Rappa Pam Pam’. Henriques was not dominant, but won four of the eight stages to finish on 476 points. Moulton, who earned top-four positions on five stages, ended at 84 per cent with 400 points. Female shooter Sue Ann Henriques, who won the last two stages, was edged into third with 384 points. The next three positions were separated by four percentage points. Ellsworth Dixon, who won the practice shoot held three days earlier, was fourth, followed by Evon Grant and Owen Campbell. Clarendon KO to break until December 31 The Noel Arscott-sponsored Clarendon Knock-out football competition will take a break until next Thursday, December 31, when the second round starts. The first round ended earlier this week, and included home-and-away matches. Jamalco, as well as the parish’s Premier League team, Humble Lion, will enter at the quarter-final stage. In results from the first round, York Town exited Sandy Bay, Bamboo Lane knocked out Kemps Hill, Springfield got rid of Spartan, Rock River made it past newcomers Bulls United from Alston, while Original Hazard took care of Little Brazil of Sheckles. In the most recent results, newcomers Anderson Drive knocked out Lionel Town 1-0 after the first leg ended 0-0, while Four Parks got the better of Treadlight by a similar margin. Jamalco top Clarendon FA awards Jamalco were deemed the best team, taking both the top competition and individual awards at the recent Clarendon Football Association 2015 awards ceremony held at Wembley Excellence Centre. Jamalco got the top incentive award for being Major League champions, Knock-out champions, in which they triumphed over Premier League team Humble Lion. They were also recognised for narrowly missing the cut to the Premier League. Jamalco secured the top individual awards, including Coach of the Year, which went to Ryan Johnson. The CFA also recognised its referees. The National award went to Kevin Morrison, while the parish’s Performance award went to Doween Tummings. Jason Jackson was handed the best assistant referee. Clarendon College was adjudged the best schoolboy team, while Lennon got the award for best female team. Battle on for semi-final spot Four teams – Pro Santos A, Express All Stars, Progressive Strikers, and Passagefort Strikers – will play off for the fourth and final semi-final spot in the South East St Catherine Netball League. The play-offs starts on Saturday, January 9, and is over three days. Based on form, Pro Santos A and Express All Stars should be in the two teams that will fight for that one spot. Meanwhile, Westchester netball team topped the standings with 16 points as the preliminary round comes to a close. Mega Angels, 13 points, occupy second spot. Pro Santos B (12 points) are third. The top three are given automatic berths to the semi-final. In a recent game, Mega Angels dismissed Pro Santos B 24-11. Free Jamaica Holiday Lacrosse camp A Jamaica Holiday Lacrosse Camp will take place at St George’s College (Emmett Park) in Kingston from Monday, December 28, to Thursday, December 31, from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. each day. This camp is funded and staffed by players and coaches primarily from the United States. Equipment is provided on loan from the Jamaica Lacrosse Association and given to committed campers to keep at the end of the camp. The organisers of the camp said that “the game will be taught in a positive and encouraging environment. Water and light refreshments are provided, along with music, games, prizes, contests, awards, and lots of fun.” There will be high-school and university men’s and women’s divisions at this camp, as well as a new youth boy’s division (Primary School boys ages 8-13). Mid-season final for January 3 The York Pharmacy-sponsored Portmore Division Two mid-season final has been pushed back to Sunday, January 3, 2016. The match was originally scheduled for Sunday, December 27. The match, which features Cedar Grove and Braeton United, will take place at the Cedar Grove playing field starting at 3 p.m. Meanwhile, both Cedar Grove and Braeton United were beaten in recent matches. Cedar Grove suffered a shock 2-0 loss to Cumberland (five points), which won their first match in four tries, while Cedar Grove were losing for the first time. Braeton United remained on six points from three games as they were clipped 1-0 by Edgewater. In another game, Daytona (seven points) spanked Southborough 4-2.last_img read more

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Surviving the deaths of children

first_imgSANTA CLARITA – They never would have chosen to become members of the exclusive group, but they are lifers and draw strength from each other’s company. The group is made up of parents and siblings of children who have died. The deaths propel them into a fourth dimension of pain and loss, and through some spiritual alchemy – and lots of talking and listening – they help each other heal. “Each time you talk about it, it seems to get easier,” Rita Fleischer said. “People sharing the same kind of pain you are in is what makes the camaraderie so special.” The causes of death are many: collisions, murder, medical malpractice, suicide. Parents of another boy find comfort in their son’s re-recorded cell-phone voice message, which they play for his cocker spaniel, Micky. “His tail wags after two years. He still knows his voice,” said Teddy Bell’s dad, Ted, about Micky. On a memorial Web site, friends send Teddy messages in heaven. Speakers often reach for tissues from boxes scattered on the floor. Group leader Diane Briones has lived through the death of her mother and brother, but her daughter Michelle’s death causes powerful aftershocks eight years later. “You can kind of move on with your life without intense pain grabbing you all the time. You still miss the person, but the pain is not as intense with a mother, a brother,” she said. “With Michelle, I still have horrible grief periods and will probably (have them) for the rest of my life.” An Antelope Valley man whose son was murdered in 1991 said he questioned how life anywhere could go on. “I found it hard to see how the sun could come up the next morning,” he said, asking that his name not be used. A parent in another support group, who had lived through 10 years of sunrises, gave him hope. Some people are so consumed by hate and anger that they want everyone to feel their pain, which they “wield like a machete or club,” the man said. They may end up intimidating others into avoiding them. Some siblings of deceased children are facing the double whammy of grieving for a brother or a sister and feeling neglected emotionally by parents mired in grief. While deceased children’s friends and co-workers, as well as the parents’ own friends, often rally around before and for several years after the funeral, they may eventually decide life should go back to “normal.” They mention the deceased child less and less, if at all. “You need support on the anniversary date – a tap on the shoulder, an ‘I know what today is’ or ‘I know what tomorrow is; I’m thinking about you,”‘ Alice Renolds said. For parents who lost a child but still have at least one other child, some mistakenly try to console them with that reminder. “I would react: ‘I don’t care if I have a million children; I lost my precious baby.’ ” A son and his wife have made her a grandmother. Briones reaches out to people who have lost an only child. “They (may) feel like they’re not a parent anymore, but they are,” she said. And of her friends the Renoldses, who have lost two children, She says the “pain is intensified all that much more. … It’s unthinkable.” Survivors say memories can surge in waves. “In the very beginning, tidal waves hit daily, sometimes hourly,” Briones said. “Further along in grief, after the first year, they hit on a regular basis but not hourly – maybe once or twice during the day.” Holidays, birthdays or movies may trigger the seismic onset. Grieving is not a tidy process, and couples may discover their styles clash. Some people distract themselves, overscheduling activities, reading only fiction or avoiding the deceased child’s belongings, while others deal with the loss head-on, quickly joining support groups and reading self-help books. The key, they say, is accepting differences. Recently Briones has received many calls from parents whose children have committed suicide. Some parents may feel stigmatized if a child has died this way, and they may hide their emotions or how the child died. “They’re afraid to say it,” she said of some parents. “There truly isn’t a stigma. It does not matter how our child died. We lost a child – that’s all that matters. Not how they died.” In addition to speaking frankly about her son’s death, Fleischer ponders the “what if” thoughts. She believes a Canadian regimen could have helped Erik if he and his parents had learned about it sooner. Traditional drugs and other therapy failed the young man, who shared his desperation with his parents. “He felt like he was losing his mind,” Fleischer said softly. Judy O’Rourke, (661) 257-5255 judy.orourke@dailynews.com SUPPORT GROUP The Compassionate Friends meet at 7 p.m. the first and third Thursday of the month at Fellowship Christian Church, 26889 Bouquet Canyon Road, behind the Goodwill store. Siblings as well as parents of deceased children are welcome. Information: Diane Briones at (661) 252-4654, or www.compassionatefriends.org. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECasino Insider: Here’s a look at San Manuel’s new high limit rooms, Asian restaurant Fleischer’s son Erik, who for 17 years was a typical kid, stepped into mental quicksand when schizophrenia gripped his mind. At 25, he took his life. He is gone, and his family needs a place to tend the great love for him that remains. Members of The Compassionate Friends listen but do not judge. In exchange for exposing raw feelings, tenderness that defies words, confusion, anger, shock and acceptance, the members get reassurance and confidentiality. Hundreds of people have participated in the annual candlelight walk organized by Alice and Tim Renolds, held in memory of their sons Tim and Danny, who were killed in a car crash six years ago Friday. On the first and third Thursday of each month, a small group sits in a circle with Alice and Tom when they let their guard down and ride tidal waves of memory, stand as beacons of survival to newcomers and, sometimes, defuse the pain with humor. Friends may wonder if it is safe to talk about the boys with Alice Renolds. They may dimly wonder how she can still be the boys’ mother when they are not here to be mothered. Looking deep into her clear blue eyes, the answer is plain. “Even if I cry when you talk about my kids, it’s OK; I’m talking about my kids,” she said. “You want to talk about them. All I have now are memories.” The tears are not barriers that warn “keep out.” last_img read more

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