Blades sharp in home win over Huskies

first_imgFollowing a scoreless first period, the second really put the Huskies behind the eight-ball. The Blades managed to score four goals on the pups, two of those coming on the power-play, compared to just a single goal scored by Fort St. John’s Dayne Pedersen.With the Huskies down 4-1 and needing a big three-goal third period, each team only managed to score once in the final frame, concluding the game 5-2 in favour of the hometown Blades. The lone goal scorer in the third for Fort St. John was Tyler Norris, who scored his eighth goal of the year Friday.  Special teams played a part in last night’s game, as the Huskies allowed two goals while short-handed, and going 0-for-7 on the power-play.- Advertisement -It was a busy night in net for Huskies goaltender Ty Gullickson, who faced 46 shots Friday, compared to the 37 fired by Fort St. John.With the loss, the Huskies, Vipers and Blades all sit tied for sixth in the NWJHL standings with 16 points.If the Huskies want to stay out of the league basement, they will need to earn two points Saturday versus the Dawson Creek Jr. Canucks, as Sexsmith and Beaverlodge play each other Saturday evening as well, guaranteeing one of the teams two points.Advertisement Saturday’s game in Dawson Creek begins at 8 p.m. and you can catch all the live action on 100.1 Moose FM.To listen live, click here.last_img read more

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Ghanaian team begins SKA training

first_img28 October 2013Seven Ghanaians arrived in South Africa earlier this month to begin training on the independent operation and maintenance of radio telescopes in Africa.Using a miniature version of a radio telecsope, they will learn how to design, build, operate and maintain an African telescope network that will support the scientific and technical activities of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA).According to Joyce Koranteng-Acquah, a research scientist at the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, the SKA is set to improve the lives of the average Ghanaian through the provision of jobs, infrastructure and tourism. Koranteng-Acquah has just arrived in South Africa for SKA-related training, which she hopes will equip her with the skills she needs eventually to help coordinate the Ghana Radio Astronomy Project.Koranteng-Acquah, along with Emmanuel Mornoh, Severin Azakpo, Theophilus Ansahnarh, Felix Madjitey, Emmanuel Adzri and Joseph Nsor, make up the first technical team from Africa to receive training as part of the African Very Long Baseline Interferometry Network (AVN) programme.The aim of the programme is to create a network of radio telescopes among SKA South Africa’s African partner countries: Botswana, Ghana, Kenya, Madagascar, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia and Zambia.New generation of African scientists, engineers“The training programme marks the start of a programme to strengthen African technical capability,” Deputy Science and Technology Minister Michael Masutha said on Friday. “Involving the African partner countries in the AVN training programme is a means of ensuring that Africa is capacitated and ready for hosting the SKA.”The Deputy Minister was speaking ahead of the programme’s launch at the MeerKAT headquarters in Pinelands, Cape Town.Masutha said the training project would establish strong collaborative Africa-Europe networks in science and engineering and would deliver practical training and hands-on experiences that would enthuse a new generation of scientists and engineers on the continent.Bringing home the basicsInitially, the Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) project will focus on the conversion of large redundant or unused telecommunication antennas into the AVN, and on training local teams to operate the new observatories.The seven Ghanaians began training on 14 October, and in their first two months will focus on the basics of radio telescope systems at the Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory (HartRAO) north of Johannesburg and at the SKA office in Cape Town. After this, another four months will be dedicated to developing their own telescope systems.“Having [access to] the world’s largest telescope to study the universe and the life of stars, and being part of this team of scientists and engineers is great,” said Adzri, an assistant research scientist at the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission.Anita Loots, associate director at SKA South Africa, said that up to 70 individuals from the eight SKA partner countries could be trained in the same way over the next few years.“The training programme itself is a world first,” added Loots. “It is a combination of engineering and scientific skills development across disciplines, which will equip teams with a thorough understanding of their own instruments.”Part of the programme uses animations to explain important engineering concepts, and the trainees will be able to use these back in Ghana to train their colleagues.‘Baby telescope’Another unique aspect of the training is what Loots calls the “baby telescope”. This training-wheel equivalent is basically a satellite television dish equipped with all the key features of a typical, but much larger, AVN radio telescope. It is officially known as the AVN Scaled Training Telescope.The trainees will build the entire system, starting with only the components, and will ultimately use it to monitor radio emissions from our own star, the sun. This exercise will help them to familiarise themselves with the principles of radio telescope design and operation.“These are the first steps towards preparing our African partners to manage SKA telescope stations,” Loots said. “We are working together to maximise the benefits of participating in SKA activities for Africa as a whole, as well as the sustainability of radio astronomy in the region.”African human capital developmentFurther steps on the way to human capital development for the AVN include formal and informal training events, such as the so-called Joint Exchange Development Initiative (JEDI) workshops. In these relaxed but high-intensity environments, university students and staff are encouraged to problem-solve together by sharing knowledge and ideas.A group of 14 astrophysics graduates from the University of Nairobi, Kenya, along with senior university staff, will be doing a five-day JEDI under the leadership of the SKA South Africa and AVN team. It is expected that JEDIs will be extensively conducted across the continent during 2014.These and other training-focussed operations form part of what can be termed a holistic approach to human capital development for African radio astronomy.Source: SKA South Africalast_img read more

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How Far from Home? SA couple chronicle their wander list online

first_imgCreative couple Chanel Cartell and Stevo Dirnberger have given up ad agency jobs and careers to travel the world and, as they go, chronicle the journey online through writing, illustration, design and photography. Joburgers Chanel Cartell and Stevo Dirnberger mark off how far from home they are by writing the kilometres on a board, on their around the world trip. They started their boards in Joburg. (Image: Supplied) • Clive Rice: South African cricketing icon dies at 66 • South African foodies cooking up a storm • Comedian David Kibuuka joins The Daily Show as writer • The Wayfaring Loner: Elvis Goes Country in Africa • Brilliant young minds at the CSIR Priya Pitamber Many dream of giving up their nine-to-five jobs to travel the world, but two Joburg advertising executives have done more than dream. On a trip from the Arctic Circle to the Mediterranean coast, with Asia and Oceania next, they are creatively charting their journey online. At significant destinations they snap a photo of their progress, holding a board showing how many kilometres they are from South Africa’s City of Gold.For 10 years Chanel Cartell (30) and Stevo Dirnberger (29) worked in the ad industry as a creative and art director, respectively. They now call themselves “creative experientialists” and are chronicling their “How Far from Home” journey on their blog and Instagram account. “It’s always been something we’ve strived towards, but constantly found ourselves saying ‘one day,’” they said.As the couple explained to Ad Week, the challenge is both geographic – to see how far they can get from Joburg – and personal: to see how far they can test and push themselves creatively.Cartell enjoys design, and Dirnberger loves to illustrate, so they combine these skills with their passion for photography on their blog – where they experiment with creative writing – and an Instagram account.It all started at the 2014 Design Indaba when they attended a talk by Stefan Sagmeister called “The Power of Time Off”. Cartell described Sagmeister’s presentation as life-changing.“In it he explained how he closes his New York design agency every seven years to take a creative sabbatical,” she said. “After hearing the talk, we both agreed it was time we turned ‘one day’ into something tangible.“We loved his idea that you should spread your retirement years throughout your lifetime, and after having been in the branding and advertising industry for nearly a decade, we figured it would be a good time to take our first creative sabbatical.”Their wander listGiving up their lives in South Africa was a long process. “Yes, even we procrastinated our dream,” Cartell confessed.They compiled their “wander list” – their version of a bucket list – and started to pool their savings and make small sacrifices to turn the dream into reality. “We stopped going out as much, and placed all disposable income into a separate account.”Dirnberger had already been diligently saving for five years, while Cartell started to save about 15% of her salary in 2014. Selling their furniture and appliances helped with extra cash.In their year of preparation they stayed motivated by reading extensively, including James Wallman’s Stuffocation and Miki Agrawal’s Do Cool Shit. Chanel Cartell and Stevo Dirnberger visit Norway on their adventure. (Image: Supplied)And off they goIn March, the couple they boarded a plane to Salzburg. Their time in the old Austrian city was one of their strangest experiences, Cartell said, because they had to unlearn the hustle and bustle of Joburg.“We adapted to the odd feeling of being completely independent, and created a new seven-to-nine routine,” she explained. “Our time was filled exploring the town of Salzburg, taking classes on Skillshare and creating art.”Time to experiment and create art is one thing they love about their journey. They also enjoy exploring cities and new cultures. They have met new people, learned new skills and made new friends.They have stuck to their wander list, which currently highlights the European countries where they both have family.“We’ve explored most of Scandinavia (Norway, Sweden, Denmark), some of central Europe (Austria, Germany), are currently in southern Europe (Greece, followed by Italy), and plan on heading south to Australia and Thailand later this year.”One-of-a-kind experiencesThe travelling couple have done things they would not and could not have done in Johannesburg. Highlights include going to the Arctic Circle and living with – and looking after – 70 huskies. An evening road trip in northern Europe was taken under the midnight sun.They summited the Untersberg in the Austrian Alps and cooked a 12-course meal with a top chef in Norway. Waking at 3am to take scenic drives along lakes in central Sweden, spotting fox cubs, reindeer and moose was another memory. Chanel Cartell and Stevo Dirnberger travel through Sweden. (Image: Supplied)Some of the best food they have eaten is all 19 courses at Noma, the acclaimed two-Michelin-star restaurant in Copenhagen, Denmark.But they did not enjoy eating whale meat in Norway: it “was tasty, but we felt odd eating it”. Traditional fish butter in Salzburg was also less than desirable. But the Austrian beer Stiegel got the thumbs up.Pitfalls on the journeyWithout regular salaries, the budget has been a challenge. “We’ve already spent more than we intended to, so things will get interesting when we run dry,” Cartell said. But she was hopeful and positive because she reckoned creativity should help them solve any issues.Another problem was the language barrier – they did end getting a little lost. Ultimately, she said, it was about balance – “balancing the high highs of having all the freedom in the world, with the low lows of demotivation and occasional doubt”.South Africa’s lureThrough it all though, there are things about South Africa they miss – Dirnberger craves boerewors rolls and biltong while Cartell misses original rooibos tea.“We also get really excited when we hear the South African accent,” she added. “We recently crashed a wedding in Athens and were very happy to hear South Africans and South African music. Mandoza is a hit at Greek weddings, it seems.”The two plan to return to South Africa in February 2016 for a wedding and a meeting. “But besides those two commitments we have no plans. We quite like the unknown and have learnt to go with the flow, so only time will tell.”You can do it tooThey believe that humans were born to explore and create, and that money spent on travel should be seen as an investment in personal growth. “Experiences and memories are worth so much more than the ‘stuff’ we accumulate with money we make, and it’s not what our hard-earned money and time should be spent on,” she added. “No matter how, everyone should make a concerted effort to explore and create daily.”Taking the plunge is the toughest part and they advise that if you are brave enough to leave everything behind, it is best to enjoy the journey once you are on it. “There will be moments of struggle and doubt, but the important thing is to reflect constantly, reminding yourself why you went on the journey in the first place,” Cartell said.It was also important to learn something new and to get out of your safe and comfortable routine. “Talk to locals and give yourself creative briefs to complete.”Staying true to themselves has allowed Cartell and Dirnberger to travel 24 567km from home so far. “We have a final number in mind, but let’s see!”last_img read more

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5 Tech Missteps That Are Killing Your Company’s Potential

first_imgHow OKR’s Completely Transformed Our Culture There are things you know you should do to make your life easier and prevent bigger problems. Maybe it’s meal planning to save money on crappy takeout. Maybe it’s buying better tires because you can see that the weather is changing for the worse. Or maybe it’s setting up two-factor authentication on your accounts so your business doesn’t get hacked.Technology mistakes cost businesses big, and they can also keep them from experiencing growth, staying relevant, and realizing their full potential. The upside? Some of the most common tech mistakes that businesses make are also the easiest to fix. If you’re still limping along with any of these misguided practices, it may be time for a change.You’re stuck on the ground.It’s great to have your feet firmly planted on the ground, right? Well, not always. If you’re talking about tech, it’s good to spend some time in the clouds. Large cloud providers provide benefits through infrastructure, data access from anywhere, and higher levels of service.David Wagner, CEO and president of cybersecurity company Zix, says cloud providers typically provide vigorous security, a priority for any organization that wants to remain competitive. When you move to the cloud, you can save money by kicking your dusty old servers to the curb while still commanding the strong security and technical expertise of cloud providers.Your single password is the name of your pet.If you’re skipping that pesky password update and two-factor authentication, you’ve saved yourself about 90 seconds of your life — while making your business a sitting duck. There’s no excuse for not having a more secure login process. Two-factor authentication requires you to use a password to login as usual, but goes one step further and forces you to confirm the login via a text message or phone call.So why all the fuss? Two words: security breach. When it comes to cyberattacks such as Heartbleed and WannaCry, no one is safe. From the everyday Joe to the largest businesses in the country, data breaches are ubiquitous. Fortunately, with Google Authenticator, Facebook Code Generator, LastPass, and other two-factor authentication and password management systems, it’s getting easier to protect your business. The implications of a breach are simply too significant to ignore the tools available to you.You’re the expert who knows everything.Technology is highly dynamic. That means that training within a company must continually evolve. If you don’t focus on keeping up, the amount of new information produced by the tech world would short-circuit your brain before you even had time to finish your morning coffee. The only way to stay on the cutting edge of the technological evolution is to routinely sharpen that blade.Give yourself and your staff as much training as possible, not only on new technologies, but on systems currently in use as well. According to some estimates, office workers fully grasp less than 20 percent of the features available in the software applications they use. That’s lost potential. Training takes time, but it leads to better, more streamlined workflows. It teaches staff how to automate repetitive tasks by using features they already have at their fingertips. When you accept that you and your business will be lifelong tech learners, you’ll stay one step ahead of the pack.You think you’re smarter than robots.More businesses every day are jumping on the artificial intelligence bandwagon, and for good reason. AI can help optimize business operations, sift through huge amounts of customer data, and capture information that can help you make better decisions. If you think you can do it better, you can’t. None of us can. The robotic takeover of the manual, repetitive, and number-crunching tasks of our businesses is inevitable.You can use this development to your advantage, or you can attempt to fight off the robot revolution. But honestly, you’d be better off joining forces. Businesses are already taking advantage of the benefits of AI with chatbots, personal shoppers, big data analysis, marketing research, and more. Take note of what your competitors are doing with AI, and follow suit.You think you’re immune to the ‘blue screen of death.’If you’ve ever lost a work presentation right before a big meeting, you understand the importance of data backup. But somehow, even though we’ve all been there at one time or another, a Carrier Access report found that a whopping 75 percent of small businesses still don’t have a disaster recovery plan in place. In fact, only 25 percent of small businesses are entirely confident that their data could be restored if it were destroyed or stolen.Businesses lose huge amounts of data every day because they either didn’t have reliable backup or failed to make sure it was running correctly. If you think it won’t happen to you, it will. Set up data backup for your business, verify that your mission-critical information is included in that backup, and perform tests periodically to make sure you can restore your data successfully.Outdated technology practices will keep your company mired in competitive quicksand. To return your business to solid ground, begin by addressing these five tech mistakes. Brad AndersonEditor In Chief at ReadWrite How to Get Started in China and Have Success China and America want the AI Prize Title: Who … Related Posts Tags:#AI#artificial intelligence#cloud apps#cloud based computing#cybersecurity#security breach#tech training What Nobody Teaches You About Getting Your Star… Brad is the editor overseeing contributed content at ReadWrite.com. He previously worked as an editor at PayPal and Crunchbase. You can reach him at brad at readwrite.com. last_img read more

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