Victory Lap Nieman Reports Explores Diversity and a B2B Title Gets a

first_img “The transfer of content is ongoing,” Berry adds. “It’s all there, but not yet all categorized. We spend a couple of hours every day categorizing.” Association / Non-Profit – Series of Articles Given the sheer volume of content — Berry estimates that U.S. Builders Review has a library of over 4,000 case studies alone, and about 6,000 total pages to transfer from the old Drupal site to the new WordPress one — the transition process from old site to new was labor intensive. ► Click here for the full list of 2016 Eddie and Ozzie Award winners. In line with its mission of equipping journalists with insights and best practices to help them better cover their communities, Nieman Reports, the quarterly journal produced by Harvard University’s Nieman Foundation for Journalism, published a series of articles addressing an especially prescient challenge for today’s newsrooms: covering minorities — both with accuracy and sensitivity. One of the biggest realizations for the industry in the wake of the 2016 Presidential Election, says Geary, was the need to address other overlooked minorities, like educational or socioeconomic diversity, what Geary calls a “prevailing lack of coverage of Middle America.” The process may be ongoing, but the response has been positive. Readers are sharing, sponsors are buying, and the website will soon expand to include native placements to meet interest from advertisers. “Our old site was very outdated,” Erica Berry, director of digital marketing and business development at parent company TrueLine Publishing, tells Folio:. “It didn’t have the functionality we felt it needed, and it didn’t give our vendors much credit. We didn’t give them much incentive to advertise.” “We have advertisers who want that digital exposure, so we want to make sure we give them those opportunities,” says Berry.  Each of the four pieces were meant not only to reflect upon the ways newsrooms cover these populations, but to provide practical strategies on how newsrooms can improve their coverage. Often, the reports found, the issue is not just that newsrooms are ill-equipped to cover issues facing minorities, but that newsrooms aren’t aware of the issues to begin with. The goal was to infuse the site with a responsive, modern-looking design that would showcase the brand’s extensive library of features, case studies, and content from sponsors — a look and feel that would encourage readers to share with their peers. U.S. Builders Reviewcenter_img “We tried to quantify, as much as possible, the actual practical impact of diversity or lack of diversity,” Nieman Foundation deputy curator James Geary tells Folio:. “The thread that connects all of these stories is just trying to raise awareness of all of the different facets of diversity, and how those play into really crucial editorial decision making. It goes beyond how you cover a story, but whether you even recognize that something is a story.” TrueLine Publishing In February, U.S. Builders Review, a trade journal serving the construction industry, set out to update its website to match the recently redesigned print edition in an effort to meet the evolving needs of both readers and advertisers. It’s at times a challenge, Geary admits, approaching such issues with the depth of coverage they deserve while keeping things rooted in practical strategies that news organizations can actually incorporate, but all four articles walk the line with graceful tact. Four articles provided an in-depth examination of four different communities — respectively, African-Americans, transgender men and women, Native Americans, and the disabled. For Nieman Reports, the mission to keep journalists in the know continues. “Covering Minorities”  B-to-B – Site Design “It’s relatively easy to identify the problem and to decry it,” Geary continues. “What’s a lot harder is knowing what to do next, giving journalists the tools to think that through and to change if what they’re doing isn’t up to the task.” Nieman Reportslast_img read more

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Pakistan pushing 100 terrorists from Afghanistan to Kashmir Valley says intel report

first_imgIndian security personnel guards at the Line of Control (LoC).ReutersIndian intelligence agencies have suggested Pakistan is planning to push 100 ‘hardcore’ terrorists from Afghanistan into the Kashmir Valley. “We have credible intelligence that Pakistan is bringing over 100 hardcore terrorists from Afghanistan and they will be pushed into Kashmir in the next few weeks,” said a military source.It was revealed that Pakistan’s assessments indicated the local terrorists in Kashmir are not adequately trained and have “low shelf-life”, leading to a leadership crisis after their elimination in anti-terror military operations.Abdul Rauf Azhar, the younger brother of Jaish-e-Mohammad chief Maulana Masood Azhar, reportedly held meetings with top commanders at the Bahawalpur headquarters on August 19 and 20 regarding ways of pushing experienced Afghan militants into the valley.Intelligence reports also claimed around 15 Jaish militants are waiting for instructions to infiltrate into Kashmir from terror cells located in Pakistan’s Lipa valley along the Line of Control (LoC).Pakistan-based terror groups are suspected of targeting vital installations in several major cities in the next few weeks, according to the sources. It was also revealed that serial attacks in Kashmir are being planned in an attempt to deceive the international community into showing the deteriorating situation in the valley, following the abrogation of special status granted to Jammu and Kashmir through Article 370.Earlier intelligence reports had stated Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) has given JeM full permission for suicide bomb attacks in the valley to cause as many casualties as they can, without worrying about “collateral damage”.Indian security forces have been on high alert following multiple updates on the reactivation of terrorist-training camps in border regions with “backing by the Pakistan army”.Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan has also made ominous statements about a military conflict between the two countries after New Delhi’s decision on Kashmir and said that “Pulwama-like attacks” can be expected. Close IBTimes VideoRelated VideosMore videos Play VideoPauseMute0:01/7:41Loaded: 0%0:01Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE-7:40?Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedSubtitlessubtitles settings, opens subtitles settings dialogsubtitles off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window. COPY LINKAD Loading …center_img PM Narendra Modi addressed the nation on Revocation of Article 370last_img read more

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70M Ambulatory Center Will Serve West Baltimore

first_imgThe University of Maryland Medical Center’s Midtown Campus plans to break ground at the end of this month on a new ambulatory care center in West Baltimore.According to officials the $70 million health facility to be built at the corner of Linden Avenue and Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard will further the medical mission of the Midtown Campus focused on preventative care to some of the city’s most vulnerable communities.“We are trying to centralize ambulatory services here on this campus,” said Brian Bailey, senior vice president and executive director of the University of Maryland Medical Center Midtown Campus.“The midtown campus is frankly more accessible to this community and this building that we’re putting together will have many of the ambulatory services that will address chronic needs of the community,” he added.Health disparities and challenges in impoverished communities of color have been widely chronicled and Bailey believes the new addition to the Midtown Campus will provide greater service to West Baltimore residents.“What is prevalent in our community are diseases such as diabetes, such as HIV, such as infectious disease…pulmonary issues,” Bailey said. “This building is going to house all of those chronic illnesses that are prevalent in our community so they (patients) can come to this center as their medical home, so you don’t have to travel all around the city to see all these specialists…to have those needs met,” he added.Bailey says the facility, which will be completed in about 22 months will provide at least 100 jobs to community residents.The new seven-story building will include a garage expansion, which would add 244 parking spaces to accommodate 525 cars. There are also plans for a pedestrian bridge. The ambulatory center will house a metabolic clinic and physician offices in addition to the clinical centers for the various diseases Bailey alluded to.“We’re here to try to improve the health of the community so that they don’t present themselves in episodic care in our emergency department and then have to get admitted,” Bailey explained.“The purpose of this building is so they will use this building as a regular touchdown space to come see their specialists to avoid all of those unnecessary emergency room visits or those unnecessary admissions because we want to manage their care on a more concurrent, chronic basis,” he added.last_img read more

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