Narine’s return brings relief

first_imgKOLKATA, India, (CMC):Kolkata Knight Riders have expressed relief following the International Cricket Council’s decision to lift the bowling ban on their champion off-spinner Sunil Narine.The 27-year-old West Indies player was banned last November after the ICC ruled his action illegal. However, he was cleared him to return to international cricket late Thursday, after remodelling his action and then successfully undergoing tests at the Sri Ramachandra University in Chennai last month.And with the new Indian Premier League bowling off today, Narine’s Knight Riders teammate Shakib Al Hasan said the news was definitely welcome.”I don’t know what changes he has had now, but it is a huge relief for the team,” the Bangladeshi all-rounder said.IMPORTANT PLAYER”He is a very important part of KKR. Every time KKR has done well, he has had huge influence. It is a positive news for us.”Narine has been key to KKR’s fortunes in the IPL. His Man-of-the-Series 24 wickets in 2012 helped them to the title and captured 21 in 2014 as the Kolkata-based franchise won the title for a second time in three years.He also nabbed 22 wickets in 2013 even though KKR missed out on the playoffs.Though Narine has been sidelined for the last four months, Shakib said he did not anticipate this having a major impact on the player’s performance.”For Narine, I don’t think so the setback will matter too much,” he pointed out.”He is a world-class spinner and everybody respects him. This time, too, he will be leading the spinning attack. He has always played a vital role for KKR.”KKR take on Carlos Brathwaite’s Delhi Daredevils in Kolkata on Sunday.last_img read more

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Surviving the deaths of children

first_imgSANTA CLARITA – They never would have chosen to become members of the exclusive group, but they are lifers and draw strength from each other’s company. The group is made up of parents and siblings of children who have died. The deaths propel them into a fourth dimension of pain and loss, and through some spiritual alchemy – and lots of talking and listening – they help each other heal. “Each time you talk about it, it seems to get easier,” Rita Fleischer said. “People sharing the same kind of pain you are in is what makes the camaraderie so special.” The causes of death are many: collisions, murder, medical malpractice, suicide. Parents of another boy find comfort in their son’s re-recorded cell-phone voice message, which they play for his cocker spaniel, Micky. “His tail wags after two years. He still knows his voice,” said Teddy Bell’s dad, Ted, about Micky. On a memorial Web site, friends send Teddy messages in heaven. Speakers often reach for tissues from boxes scattered on the floor. Group leader Diane Briones has lived through the death of her mother and brother, but her daughter Michelle’s death causes powerful aftershocks eight years later. “You can kind of move on with your life without intense pain grabbing you all the time. You still miss the person, but the pain is not as intense with a mother, a brother,” she said. “With Michelle, I still have horrible grief periods and will probably (have them) for the rest of my life.” An Antelope Valley man whose son was murdered in 1991 said he questioned how life anywhere could go on. “I found it hard to see how the sun could come up the next morning,” he said, asking that his name not be used. A parent in another support group, who had lived through 10 years of sunrises, gave him hope. Some people are so consumed by hate and anger that they want everyone to feel their pain, which they “wield like a machete or club,” the man said. They may end up intimidating others into avoiding them. Some siblings of deceased children are facing the double whammy of grieving for a brother or a sister and feeling neglected emotionally by parents mired in grief. While deceased children’s friends and co-workers, as well as the parents’ own friends, often rally around before and for several years after the funeral, they may eventually decide life should go back to “normal.” They mention the deceased child less and less, if at all. “You need support on the anniversary date – a tap on the shoulder, an ‘I know what today is’ or ‘I know what tomorrow is; I’m thinking about you,”‘ Alice Renolds said. For parents who lost a child but still have at least one other child, some mistakenly try to console them with that reminder. “I would react: ‘I don’t care if I have a million children; I lost my precious baby.’ ” A son and his wife have made her a grandmother. Briones reaches out to people who have lost an only child. “They (may) feel like they’re not a parent anymore, but they are,” she said. And of her friends the Renoldses, who have lost two children, She says the “pain is intensified all that much more. … It’s unthinkable.” Survivors say memories can surge in waves. “In the very beginning, tidal waves hit daily, sometimes hourly,” Briones said. “Further along in grief, after the first year, they hit on a regular basis but not hourly – maybe once or twice during the day.” Holidays, birthdays or movies may trigger the seismic onset. Grieving is not a tidy process, and couples may discover their styles clash. Some people distract themselves, overscheduling activities, reading only fiction or avoiding the deceased child’s belongings, while others deal with the loss head-on, quickly joining support groups and reading self-help books. The key, they say, is accepting differences. Recently Briones has received many calls from parents whose children have committed suicide. Some parents may feel stigmatized if a child has died this way, and they may hide their emotions or how the child died. “They’re afraid to say it,” she said of some parents. “There truly isn’t a stigma. It does not matter how our child died. We lost a child – that’s all that matters. Not how they died.” In addition to speaking frankly about her son’s death, Fleischer ponders the “what if” thoughts. She believes a Canadian regimen could have helped Erik if he and his parents had learned about it sooner. Traditional drugs and other therapy failed the young man, who shared his desperation with his parents. “He felt like he was losing his mind,” Fleischer said softly. Judy O’Rourke, (661) 257-5255 judy.orourke@dailynews.com SUPPORT GROUP The Compassionate Friends meet at 7 p.m. the first and third Thursday of the month at Fellowship Christian Church, 26889 Bouquet Canyon Road, behind the Goodwill store. Siblings as well as parents of deceased children are welcome. Information: Diane Briones at (661) 252-4654, or www.compassionatefriends.org. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORECasino Insider: Here’s a look at San Manuel’s new high limit rooms, Asian restaurant Fleischer’s son Erik, who for 17 years was a typical kid, stepped into mental quicksand when schizophrenia gripped his mind. At 25, he took his life. He is gone, and his family needs a place to tend the great love for him that remains. Members of The Compassionate Friends listen but do not judge. In exchange for exposing raw feelings, tenderness that defies words, confusion, anger, shock and acceptance, the members get reassurance and confidentiality. Hundreds of people have participated in the annual candlelight walk organized by Alice and Tim Renolds, held in memory of their sons Tim and Danny, who were killed in a car crash six years ago Friday. On the first and third Thursday of each month, a small group sits in a circle with Alice and Tom when they let their guard down and ride tidal waves of memory, stand as beacons of survival to newcomers and, sometimes, defuse the pain with humor. Friends may wonder if it is safe to talk about the boys with Alice Renolds. They may dimly wonder how she can still be the boys’ mother when they are not here to be mothered. Looking deep into her clear blue eyes, the answer is plain. “Even if I cry when you talk about my kids, it’s OK; I’m talking about my kids,” she said. “You want to talk about them. All I have now are memories.” The tears are not barriers that warn “keep out.” last_img read more

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Red Flag Warning issued due to increased fire danger

first_imgRed Flag Warning issued due to increased fire danger 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) — The National Weather Service Saturday issued a red flag warning through Monday for much of San Diego County as well as a large swath of Southern California, saying the region would be at an increased risk for wildfires to start and spread.The warning for San Diego County will remain in effect from 7 p.m. tonight until 4 p.m. Monday.Most inland areas will face moderate Santa Ana winds and low humidity levels as high pressure strengthens over the great basin, the NWS said, giving any fires that develop this weekend the potential to strengthen rapidly.The agency urged people to avoid outdoor burning, and also warned that high winds will make driving difficult, especially for high-profile vehicles.Forecasters predicted winds to be strongest on Monday, with humidity at its lowest today and Monday.Winds of 15 to 20 miles per hour, with gusts up to 30 mph, were expected for today. Winds were predicted to strengthen on Sunday up to 30 mph, with isolated gusts as high as 65 mph. Forecasters expected the strongest winds to occur along lower mountain slopes and below passes and canyons.The winds should start to die down on Tuesday, and humidity will recover slightly Tuesday and Wednesday, the NWS said. , Posted: January 27, 2018 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Updated: 6:40 PM January 27, 2018last_img read more

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Victory Lap Nieman Reports Explores Diversity and a B2B Title Gets a

first_img “The transfer of content is ongoing,” Berry adds. “It’s all there, but not yet all categorized. We spend a couple of hours every day categorizing.” Association / Non-Profit – Series of Articles Given the sheer volume of content — Berry estimates that U.S. Builders Review has a library of over 4,000 case studies alone, and about 6,000 total pages to transfer from the old Drupal site to the new WordPress one — the transition process from old site to new was labor intensive. ► Click here for the full list of 2016 Eddie and Ozzie Award winners. In line with its mission of equipping journalists with insights and best practices to help them better cover their communities, Nieman Reports, the quarterly journal produced by Harvard University’s Nieman Foundation for Journalism, published a series of articles addressing an especially prescient challenge for today’s newsrooms: covering minorities — both with accuracy and sensitivity. One of the biggest realizations for the industry in the wake of the 2016 Presidential Election, says Geary, was the need to address other overlooked minorities, like educational or socioeconomic diversity, what Geary calls a “prevailing lack of coverage of Middle America.” The process may be ongoing, but the response has been positive. Readers are sharing, sponsors are buying, and the website will soon expand to include native placements to meet interest from advertisers. “Our old site was very outdated,” Erica Berry, director of digital marketing and business development at parent company TrueLine Publishing, tells Folio:. “It didn’t have the functionality we felt it needed, and it didn’t give our vendors much credit. We didn’t give them much incentive to advertise.” “We have advertisers who want that digital exposure, so we want to make sure we give them those opportunities,” says Berry.  Each of the four pieces were meant not only to reflect upon the ways newsrooms cover these populations, but to provide practical strategies on how newsrooms can improve their coverage. Often, the reports found, the issue is not just that newsrooms are ill-equipped to cover issues facing minorities, but that newsrooms aren’t aware of the issues to begin with. The goal was to infuse the site with a responsive, modern-looking design that would showcase the brand’s extensive library of features, case studies, and content from sponsors — a look and feel that would encourage readers to share with their peers. U.S. Builders Reviewcenter_img “We tried to quantify, as much as possible, the actual practical impact of diversity or lack of diversity,” Nieman Foundation deputy curator James Geary tells Folio:. “The thread that connects all of these stories is just trying to raise awareness of all of the different facets of diversity, and how those play into really crucial editorial decision making. It goes beyond how you cover a story, but whether you even recognize that something is a story.” TrueLine Publishing In February, U.S. Builders Review, a trade journal serving the construction industry, set out to update its website to match the recently redesigned print edition in an effort to meet the evolving needs of both readers and advertisers. It’s at times a challenge, Geary admits, approaching such issues with the depth of coverage they deserve while keeping things rooted in practical strategies that news organizations can actually incorporate, but all four articles walk the line with graceful tact. Four articles provided an in-depth examination of four different communities — respectively, African-Americans, transgender men and women, Native Americans, and the disabled. For Nieman Reports, the mission to keep journalists in the know continues. “Covering Minorities”  B-to-B – Site Design “It’s relatively easy to identify the problem and to decry it,” Geary continues. “What’s a lot harder is knowing what to do next, giving journalists the tools to think that through and to change if what they’re doing isn’t up to the task.” Nieman Reportslast_img read more

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S Arabia expels Canada envoy over interference

first_imgIn this file photo taken on 13 June, 2018 Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland gestures as she speaks after receiving Foreign Policy’s 2018 Diplomat of the Year award in Washington, DC. Photo: AFPSaudi Arabia said Monday it was expelling the Canadian ambassador and had recalled its envoy while freezing all new trade, in protest at Ottawa’s vigorous calls for the release of jailed activists.The kingdom gave the Canadian ambassador 24 hours to leave the country, in an abrupt rupture of relations over what it slammed as “interference” in its internal affairs.The move, which underscores a newly aggressive foreign policy led by crown prince Mohammed bin Salman, comes after Canada demanded the immediate release of human rights campaigners swept up in a new crackdown.“The Canadian position is an overt and blatant interference in the internal affairs of the kingdom of Saudi Arabia,” the Saudi foreign ministry tweeted.“The kingdom announces that it is recalling its ambassador to Canada for consultation. We consider the Canadian ambassador to the kingdom persona non grata and order him to leave within the next 24 hours.”The ministry also announced “the freezing of all new trade and investment transactions with Canada while retaining its right to take further action”.Canada last week said it was “gravely concerned” over a new wave of arrests of women and human rights campaigners in the kingdom, including award-winning gender rights activist Samar Badawi.“We urge the Saudi authorities to immediately release them and all other peaceful #humanrights activists,” the foreign ministry tweeted on Friday.‘Unprecedented crackdown’Samar was arrested along with fellow campaigner Nassima al-Sadah last week, the latest victims of what Human Rights Watch called an “unprecedented government crackdown on the women’s rights movement”.Samar is a vocal campaigner for blogger Raif Badawi, her brother who was arrested in 2012 and sentenced to 1,000 lashes and 10 years in jail for “insulting Islam” in a case that sparked an international outcry.The latest arrests come weeks after more than a dozen women’s right campaigners were detained and accused of undermining national security and collaborating with enemies of the state. Some have since been released.The Saudi foreign ministry slammed the Canadian statement, signalling its growing irritation over Western criticism of the kingdom’s poor human rights record.“Using the phrase ‘immediately release’ in the Canadian statement is very unfortunate, reprehensible, and unacceptable in relations between states,” the ministry tweeted.Prince Mohammed, heir to the region’s most powerful throne, has introduced a string of reforms such as lifting a decades-long ban on women drivers in a bid to overhaul the kingdom’s austere image as it prepares for a post-oil era.But the 32-year-old has simultaneously pursued a hawkish foreign policy-including leading a blockade of neighbouring Qatar and a bombing campaign against Iran-backed Huthi rebels in Yemen-while cracking down on dissent at home.‘Serious concern’“The rupture in Saudi diplomatic relations with Canada reinforces how the ‘new’ Saudi Arabia that Mohammed bin Salman is putting together is in no mood to tolerate any form of criticism of its handling of domestic affairs,” said Kristian Ulrichsen, a fellow at Rice University’s Baker Institute in the United States.In April, Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau expressed his “serious concern” over the continued jailing of Badawi to Saudi King Salman.Badawi’s wife Ensaf Haidar has been granted asylum by Canada, where she is raising their three children now aged 14, 13 and 10 as a single mother.Riyadh’s expulsion of the Canadian ambassador was meant to send a strong message to other critical Western governments, observers say.“Canada is easier to cut ties with than the rest,” Bessma Momani, a professor at Canada’s University of Waterloo, told AFP.“There isn’t a strong bilateral trade relationship and poking the Trudeau government likely resonates with Saudi’s hawkish regional allies. At jeopardy, are the tens of thousands of Saudi students in Canada.”last_img read more

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