Student innovators present concepts

first_imgContestants at the USC Stevens Center for Innovation’s sixth annual Student Innovator Showcase spent Friday pitching their inventions and business ventures to attendees and judges.“Cleatskins” · Reid Pearson, a 2011 graduate who majored in business adminstration, presented a product that keeps athletic cleats free of dirt. – Priyanka Patel | Daily TrojanThere were 106 projects submitted for the showcase, and the top 30 were offered the chance to compete.The inventions ranged from a gum that reads glucose levels to an enzyme-replenishing product that would eliminate flushed skin after drinking alcohol. Retractable high heels and a website to help people move to job-rich rural communities also debuted at the competition.“Overall, I thought the quality was amazing. Every year the quality goes up,” said Dr. Karen Kerr, a judge for the showcase.The judges look for similar criteria in each projects: the originality of the idea, the passion of the team and the feasibility of the concept.Ian Murphy, director of communications for the showcase, explained  he also looks for a “wow” factor in inventions.“I love when there are things that I can say ‘I can’t believe that hasn’t been done before,’” Murphy said.Participants said not many schools offer events of this value and caliber.“I think it’s phenomenal. It’s incredible that [the USC Stevens Center] puts on these events. It’s very important for the campus ecosystem,” said Matt Lucido, a Marshall graduate student and showcase participant.His product, Overlap, an app that helps users “bookmark” intriguing restaurants, made it to the final round of Fast Pitches.“Now I’m just hoping for a successful launch,” Lucido said. “It’s a matter of others finding it useful.”Murphy feels this event does a great job of putting the spotlight on the life of a student entrepreneur.“It’s challenging and scary to put yourself out there — entrepreneurs don’t often get credit for it. Student entrepreneurs have to work like a student athlete. They have to learn to balance two separate lives,” Murphy said.In the final rounds of the competition, the top-10 concepts were given the opportunity to “Fast Pitch” to a panel of judges for cash prizes. At the end of the day, Automatic Hand-Hygiene Verification won the biggest prize of $4,000 for Most Innovative product.Jonathan Liu, a graduate student at the Keck School of Medicine and part of the team behind Automatic Hand-Hygiene Verification, said the team hopes to go through clinical trials to prove their invention works. Their product involves a sensor in hospitals to detect when doctors do not wash their hands before entering. They also hope to get the device patented.Many participants agreed the most important part of the showcase was not the opportunity for prize money, but rather the networking possibilities and feedback.“Someone may have a different twist on your idea that could make it better,” said Nick Cegelski, a freshman majoring in public relations who presented a concept where advertisers wofuld pay to take over customer’s cell phone wallpapers.Breaking Heels, the project which designed retractable high heels, was presented by Jessica Risch, a second year masters of business administration student. Risch felt the experience alone helped her improve her project.“I was surprised and honored to be a finalist. The feedback was really helpful for refining my idea,” Risch said. “It’s such a great opportunity to take your business idea and get great exposure to people in the field. It is great networking and I gained a lot of confidence in my pitch.”Amitha Ganti, a graduate student at Keck and part of the Automatic Hand-Hygiene Verification team, said winning a prize was an added bonus to an already worthwhile event.“All the inventions were awesome,” Ganti said. “It’s not just about winning, but being a part of it.”last_img read more

See More

Syracuse benefitting from video review, wants system expanded to all games

first_img Published on November 7, 2017 at 9:45 pm Contact Anthony: amdabbun@syr.edu Up 20-19 in the second set against Georgia Tech on Oct. 8, Syracuse lost a point after an out call on a Santita Ebangwese kill attempt.Or so the Orange thought. Head coach Leonid Yelin immediately went up to the second referee, challenging the call. Because the game was televised, the call was reviewed, and Ebangwese’s ball was ruled in bounds.What would have been a tie game in a critical second set became a two-point Orange lead. SU ended up winning the set by two.Syracuse (17-10, 9-5 Atlantic Coast) has benefited from the challenge system this season, but Yelin is not satisfied. With the technology now frequently available, he wants to see the ACC expanding replay to every game, not just those that are televised. Often, a few key points can decide a match and millimeters make the difference between winning and losing a point.The challenge replay system was first introduced to volleyball at the Rio Olympics in 2016, after it was tested across international play in 2014 and 2015. In fall 2015, both the Big Ten and PAC-12 adopted the challenge system, and now it has expanded to other conferences.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textWhenever WatchESPN or the ACC Network televises games, coaches could review any point. For Yelin, this serves as a failsafe, protecting against referee mistakes that occur due to the fast-paced nature of the sport.“The level of the game got so much better, and unfortunately,” Yelin said, “a lot of referees are behind this game.”When replay is available, coaches can challenge four types of calls. The most common is on in-out decisions. Coaches can also challenge a touch off a player, a service-foot fault or an illegal net touch during a point.Coaches receive three challenges per match, and can use them as they please. Even if a coach gets the challenge right, they still sacrifice one of the challenges. Yelin prefers that the NCAA adapt to the overseas rule.“They have two challenges every set,” Yelin said, “and if you challenge and are right you don’t lose a challenge.”For senior Belle Sand, who played years without the challenge system, video replay has come as a huge relief for her and other players. When they are nervously standing around anticipating the call, it can kill the flow of the game. But, Sand said, getting the call right is more important than the time lost.“I love challenges, it’s a huge momentum shift,” Sand said. “I get pumped when we win the challenges because there are some bad calls that referees make and it would be really frustrating knowing it was wrong.”The system is not perfect because indisputable video evidence is required for the second referee to overturn the call. With only one official looking at the replay, there is no room for debate and discussion among the officials.Also, logistically, Syracuse would need additional staff on site, along with cameras, to make the challenge system accessible for all games. This would require additional funding from the conference, Yelin said. Despite the additional costs, Yelin believes in prioritizing video review for the quality of volleyball.“Coaches and players are putting so much time and effort and one mistake can cost the match and so many hours and days,” Yelin said. “In the end, we want the kids to win or lose because of the game, not because of a referee mistake.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

See More

Kazazić and Turković Ready for Paralympics in Sochi

first_imgThe B&H Paralympics team will take part in the Winter Paralympic Games in the Russian city of Sochi.This will be the team’s second appearance at the Games, and two athletes will represent B&H, alpine skiers Ilma Kazazić, who will carry the B&H flag at the opening of the Games and Senad Turković.At the press conference, the President of the B&H Paralympics Team Mustafa Demir emphasized that a good result is expected of the B&H team.‘’We hope for good results from our athletes. Everything is ready for their travels and performances. The only problem until now has been the lack of snow, due to which they were not able to best prepare for this. However, we believe that the organizers of the Games in Sochi will create the best possible conditions’’, said Demir.Kazazić said that she will give her all to achieve a good result, but that the lack of snow on the mountains in B&H significantly impeded preparations for the Games.Turković said that he always goes to win, and will give his maximum in Sochi. Turković is the only competitor in Sochi with both legs amputated, and on 13 March he will compete in the Slalom, and in the Giant Slalom on 15 March. Ilma Kazazić will compete in the Giant Slalom on 16 March.The B&H Paralympics Team will depart for Sochi on 4 March.(Source: Fena)last_img read more

See More