Imported foods

first_imgIf one of your New Year’s resolutions is to eat only American-grown food, mark apple juice, cauliflower, garlic and limes off your grocery list. A University of Georgia food scientist says the majority of these foods are imported from other countries.“In 2006, about 15 percent of the food consumed in the U.S. was imported,” said Faith Critzer, a researcher with the UGA Center for Food Safety in Griffin, Ga. “And almost 44 percent of the fruit and 16 percent of the vegetable supply were imported to the U.S. in 2005.”A variety are importedMost apple juice, frozen cauliflower, garlic and limes consumed in the U.S. are imported, Critzer said. The apple juice and garlic come from China. The cauliflower and limes are courtesy of Mexico. In 2008, 80 percent of fresh artichokes, 79.9 percent of fresh asparagus and 52.9 percent of fresh cucumbers in U.S. stores were imported. Population growth and consumer demand for fresh produce year-round are driving forces the increase in imports, Critzer said.Nuts and seafood, tooAlmost half of all shelled nuts consumed by Americans are imported, according to a 2005 report by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The major countries exporting nuts to the U.S. are Vietnam, India, Mexico, Brazil and China. And 80 percent of the seafood consumed in the U.S. is imported.Critzer says the safety of these imported foods will be a growing concern in the future. The problem isn’t where the food comes from, but how it’s grown or processed before it reaches American soil and, ultimately, American dinner tables.According to a 2009 Food Marketing Institute report, three-quarters of American shoppers surveyed are either “somewhat comfortable” or “not too comfortable” with foods grown outside the U.S.Supply chains stretch overseasThe influx of imported food didn’t happen over night, said Jim Daniels, an agricultural economist with the UGA Center for Agribusiness and Economic Development. “Over the 1900s, America’s food systems underwent dramatic changes and evolved into the very highly specialized and complex businesses that exist today,” Daniels said.These changes have resulted in longer supply chains that often stretch past the borders of the U.S., Daniels said.For example, a double-patty hamburger with cheese and sauce sold by a well-known national fast food chain has over 150 ingredients. Half of those ingredients could originate from outside the U.S., he said. “Our food now comes from all corners of the globe, passes through many more hands and reaches our tables in many more forms than ever before,” Daniel said. “Likewise, the products that we grow and manufacture in Georgia are distributed all over the country and world and may end up as ingredients in literally tens of thousands of other products.”Improved detection methods neededWhat can concerned Americans do?Michael Doyle, head of the UGA Center for Food Safety, says the solution lies in the hands of food producers, processors and regulatory agencies like the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.”Solutions to today’s food safety issues will not come easy,” Doyle said. “They will require a major research commitment to developing state-of-the-art science methods to detect, control and eliminate harmful substances in foods.”The food industry, whether it be growers, manufacturers or distributors, is responsible for providing safe foods,” he said. “And regulatory agencies need more rapid and robust sampling and detection methods to verify that foods, especially those that are imported, are safe from harmful microbes and chemicals.”For now, UGA experts encourage consumers to wash produce thoroughly, cook meats to appropriate temperatures and keep kitchen utensils and countertops clean. For more tips on keeping your family safe from foodborne illness, see the Web site www.fcs.uga.edu/fdn/. Or, call your local UGA Cooperative Extension office at 1-800-ASK-UGA1.last_img read more

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New York’s ambitious offshore wind plans can benefit from advances in Europe

first_imgNew York’s ambitious offshore wind plans can benefit from advances in Europe FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Greentech Media:New York state will look to the world leader in offshore wind deployment for advice on how to connect sea-based projects to mainland grids.European nations have together installed nearly 16,000 megawatts of offshore wind capacity. The United States has thus far managed just one 30-megawatt project, the Block Island Wind Farm, off Rhode Island.Earlier this month, Governor Andrew Cuomo’s office announced that the New York Power Authority (NYPA) would lead a study of successful offshore wind transmission models, particularly in Europe, to determine the most cost-effective way to build interconnections for the 2,400 megawatts of capacity to be installed off the coast of New York by 2030.“This came out of work both NYSERDA [New York State Energy Research and Development Authority] and NYPA had been doing to try to investigate how New York state can bring down the cost of offshore wind and reach the governor’s offshore wind target, 2,400 megawatts,” Robert F. Lurie, executive vice president and CFO of NYPA, told Greentech Media in an interview. “In order to do that much offshore wind,” he added, “we at NYPA felt that one of the unexplored areas for cost reduction was the transmission part of the equation.”According to New York’s offshore wind master plan, transmission could account for 30 percent of the total project costs of an offshore wind farm.In July, New York’s Public Service Commission confirmed the timeline for the first phase of the state’s offshore wind deployment. In the fourth quarter of this year, NYSERDA will issue a solicitation for 800 megawatts of offshore wind, in coordination with NYPA and the Long Island Power Authority. Winning bids are scheduled to be announced in the second quarter of 2019.According to Lurie, developers for that first 800 megawatts of offshore wind capacity will likely be responsible for building the transmission to connect the projects to onshore grids. But based on the findings of the new transmission study, different models could be employed for future projects.“In the longer term, as we build out a much higher volume of projects, we need to investigate other options for how to bring the costs down for transmission,” he said.The study aims to answer a series of questions. Who should own transmission? A public entity? One or more private entities? Or a consortium of entities? Who should finance transmission?And how should projects be connected to mainland grids? Should planners opt for radial interconnections (a single cable connecting an individual project to the onshore grid), or a networked solution in which a few major connections act as hubs to connect distant offshore projects to online transmission?Advice from EuropeSoon after New York announced the launch of its transmission models study, Wilfried Breuer published an op-ed at NJ Spotlight, a New Jersey politics and policy website, advising policymakers to follow Europe’s example and keep offshore wind project generation and transmission separate. Governor Phil Murphy signed an executive order in January directing New Jersey regulators to put the state on a path to deploy 3,500 megawatts of offshore wind by 2030.Breuer is managing director of TenneT Offshore and a member of the executive board of its parent company TenneT Holding B.V. TenneT is a transmission system operator (TSO) that has connected 5,300 megawatts of offshore wind in Germany and the Netherlands to mainland grids.“Building an offshore grid separately from the wind farms and offering access to the power grid on a nondiscriminatory basis is the key to creating a level playing field for competition between offshore generators,” he wrote.He went on, “As can be seen in the declining prices offered by those generators in Germany and the Netherlands, providing access to an offshore grid stimulates innovation and cost reductions in the offshore wind industry.”More: New York Looks to Europe for Successful Offshore Wind Transmission Modelslast_img read more

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Ego vs. ROI: Why a viral goal is wrong for your credit union brand

first_imgAt a recent conference, the speaker pointed out a “viral” TD Canada YouTube video series with an Automated Thanking Machine. In this campaign, a (very expensive) fake ATM is filmed by a (very very expensive) camera crew from a (super expensive) agency as a customer is greeted by (an extremely expensive) Jose Bautista and invited to throw out the (ridiculously expensive) first pitch at a Blue Jays game. This is just one video in a series of many. Of course, the video was a viral hit, much like the famous WestJet Christmas Miracle campaign and the Banco Sabadell orchestra flashmob.As marketers, we get excited about great brand messages like these, but there is a temptation to think that “going viral” is a good target for our own local brands. Aside from the extreme expense, which few if any brands in the conference room could match, it was easy to forget that the ad was being presented by an American presenter in a Las Vegas hotel to a bunch of industry fanboys & girls. In the whole room of 1,000+, not one person was likely to become a TD customer. I wondered how much of TD’s massive spend was reaching eyes just like mine: irrelevant ones.EGO vs. ROIIn a way, “going viral” is much more about pride than good marketing. This is not a judgement of any brand or marketer, but self-reflection. In my interview for my current position, I highlighted a viral success of my own (ad 1, 2, 3) which earned 4,000 organic views overnight and quickly earned more than 24,000 total views with no promotion. I was, and am, very proud of them. But what I didn’t mention in that interview, mostly because it simply had not occurred to me at the time, was that almost none of these views were from a relevant audience.The ads were voiced and directed by this guy, who has a loyal following of tens of thousands worldwide. (Let alone the US, let alone Colorado, let alone Denver county, let alone target) The ads were picked up by several industry pubs, so a whole bunch of credit union marketers were geeking out about them worldwide. (Let alone the US, let alone…) We even got emails from credit unions in New York, California, Canada and Scotland asking to borrow the material. Finally, there were thousands of views from the general public… worldwide. Yay for Math!Let’s take our meager investment of $1,500 for the series. If we say the campaign earned 24,000 views, it’s only 6 cents per view! But if we remove 15,000 views from Jeff’s fan base, and another 4,000 from CU marketers, we’re left with 4,000 views. Still a respectable 37 cents per view. Now, consider that the rest might be evenly distributed across America’s 319 million people. All of the sudden, we’re left with just about 1 relevant viewer… me! No wonder I liked them! Apparently I spent $1,500 just to tickle my ego. If my field of membership reached as wide as TD’s, maybe I could justify the spend, but like most of my credit union peers, it doesn’t and I can’t.While these videos were created long before we had a built-in Facebook audience, which certainly would have reached a higher percentage of relevant viewers, it doesn’t change the fact that the “viral” nature of these ads did not produce nearly as many relevant viewers as a $10 boosted post of any video would have.The Struggle is RealThe worldwide web is great at being, well, worldwide – but it isn’t good at being local. At least not for free. But even if there’s no value in going viral outside your market area, it’s at least a lot of fun – well, usually. Going viral stinks if it costs you lots of money.To give an example outside of the realm of video, my credit union recently had our $150 bounty offer go “viral” when it was picked up by sites like FatWallet and SlickDeals. These sites show people how to get free money by opening and closing bounty accounts. We had people opening accounts from all over the country just to get $150.Say that, of the general population, there are only .25% of people who have the time and enough screws loose to go through all of this work over the course of months just for $150. Of those, say 10% follow sites like FatWallet. Here’s how the numbers break down:US population: (319M * .25%)*10% = 79,750 potential abusersTo limit the damage, we added a requirement to open your account in a branch. While the major damage had already been done, this move turned that math in our favor by excluding 99% of the US population, including many legitimate new accounts:People near a branch: (13M * .25)*10% = 3,250 potential abusers How to Make the World Wide Web LocalI loved seeing my work spread from person to person so quickly, and I think it is awesome that TD had such success. This article is not about why going viral is bad. To the contrary, it is great! But it shouldn’t be the goal. The goal should be to reach lots of relevant eyes with a tiny spend per relevant view.Some tips to accomplish this:Hire local college students and artists. They will be excited to post their work to their friends. If the average person has 338 “friends”, and we estimate 1/4 are relevant viewers, your spend on the local artist will reach 84 relevant viewers for free.Engage your staff in content creation. If you involve 10 of your staff in a video shoot, and each share the completed project, you’ve reached 840 relevant eyes using the math above.Find local landmarks that let locals know you’re in on the secret: For example, I grew up in Moab, UT and only locals know about the spectacular waterfalls after a rain. To be locally relevant, a Moab credit union could hire a photographer to photograph these waterfalls and distribute them on social media. Everyone else in the world wants to see arches, but people from Moab know that waterfalls are the true spectacle.Partner with local businesses for cobranded content: Local businesses have local followers. Aside from the great publicity of aligning your brand with another local favorite, you’ll reach many relevant eyes when the business posts the content. 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Bradley Blue No matter what Brad were to say about himself in this bio, it would be easy to find the truth about him with a simple google search. This applies to … Detailslast_img read more

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Strategic Hispanic growth plans begin with readiness assessment

first_imgThe Hispanic market is the largest, fastest-growing segment in this country, but that’s only one reason U.S. credit unions are working hard to learn more about this demographic.Smart credit union executives understand the Hispanic population is very young compared to other U.S. ethnic groups. This presents an opportunity to lower the average age of membership by bringing Hispanics into the fold. Hispanics are also disproportionately underserved, and credit union leaders view helping Hispanics navigate the U.S. financial system as an important part of the overall credit union mission. Lastly, the face of the American consumer is changing, and growing membership means adapting to consumers, rather than forcing them to adapt to the credit union.Seeing the benefit of serving the Hispanic population is one thing. Truly understanding what it takes to do so is another. To gain that understanding, credit unions must begin by examining their current outreach and potential for growth.One way credit unions have pursued this is through strategic planning designed specifically to meet a Hispanic membership growth objective. The most effective plans not only include a roadmap; they also supply a solid benchmark so that credit unions can effectively measure their success and prove the return on their investment.The first step to drafting a good strategic plan is uncovering a credit union’s readiness to reach a new market. Or for those credit unions that have already begun, understanding staff’s readiness to take their efforts to the next level.For its part, the roadmap portion of the strategic plan outlines how a credit union can implement tactics in the proper sequence. This allows the team leading the effort to achieve results much faster and much more cost-effectively than they may without a charted course.A few key questions a credit union should ask and answer as they build out their strategic plan include:Is the credit union well positioned to target and serve the Hispanic market? How many Hispanic members is the credit union currently serving? How many Hispanic members could the credit union serve and what is the income potential? We refer to three stages in the quest to become a successful Hispanic-community credit union: Discovery, Emerging and Best Practice.Credit unions in the Discovery phase are considering Hispanic outreach but have not yet pulled the trigger on any tactical portions of a strategic plan. In fact, most do not yet have a fully formulated plan. They want to learn more; leaders just don’t quite know where to start.In the Emerging phase, credit union staff have recognized the benefits and importance of serving the Hispanic community. They have laid the foundation and taken steps to adapt their products and services to Hispanic members (rather than waiting for the Hispanic members to adapt to them).Best Practices credit unions have successfully served the market for years. They are preferred by Hispanics in their area, have strong financial educational programs and maintain an innovative growth culture.Hispanic growth plans represent an indispensable investment in the future. Yet having a plan on its own will not generate the kind of success a credit union needs. Readiness to executive must be achieved first. Only then can the integration of a Hispanic growth strategy with the credit union’s overall strategic future create sustainable success.To learn more, read the full white paper; “Asking the Right Questions.” 90SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Miriam De Dios Woodward Miriam De Dios Woodward is the CEO of PolicyWorks, LLC. She also serves as Senior Vice President of AMC, the holding company of the Iowa Credit Union League and parent … Web: https://www.policyworksllc.com Detailslast_img read more

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Are your coworkers OK? How to build team trust and cohesion while working from home

first_imgThis is placeholder text continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr It’s safe to say that almost nothing this year has gone according to plan. That’s not to mention that the days are getting shorter, and we’re all confronting the reality of winter in the thick of a pandemic.So, how are you doing? How are your coworkers doing? Is everyone ok?Chances are, everyone is not ok. While we can’t solve our coworkers’ problems (or some of our own problems, for that matter), we can be a positive force in their lives.Our country may be fundamentally fractured, but at the end of the day, it’s the communities around us that matter the most: our families, our neighborhoods, our schools, and our coworkers. Credit unions are well-versed in the vital importance of our local communities. And the good news is, within those communities, we have the power to make things better.center_img This post is currently collecting data…last_img read more

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Firefighters Respond To A Smokey Situation

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisA smokey situation in Alpena, reminds us of the saying “better safe than sorry”.Today Alpena City Firefighters responded to an incident on 114 East Dunbar street, where a possible fire was reported.“A local contractor was doing some work on this house, uh painting, and they were using a heat gun and uh with the heat some of the paint was setting on fire and they thought it got possibly into the attic and there was smoke,” said Lieutenant Andy Marceau of alpena city fire department.Although the contractor was unsure of the severity of the situation, Lt. Marceau says they did the right thing by calling the fire department.“It was more for precaution they were doing…being on the safe side. Obviously a contractor any time they’re doing work and they have smoke or using round heat they should take precaution,” said Lieutenant Marceau.Firefighters used thermal imaging cameras in the attic area to determine if there was any heat. They also checked the roof for any indication of a fire extension. It took less than half an hour to deem the area as safe. As we’re getting into warmer temperatures and doing some housework, Lt. Marceau advises that we use precaution, such as having fire extinguishers or water nearby, and to never hesitate to call the fire department because… Better safe than sorry! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to MoreAddThisContinue ReadingPrevious Remembering Tom ScanlanNext MSP Celebrates 100th Anniversary with Open Houselast_img read more

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City League Roundup…Allderdice, Perry red hot, Carrick blows out Westinghouse

first_imgRunning back Patrick Ferguson provided most of the offense, carrying the ball 28 times for 162 yards and two touchdowns. Quarterback Mike Pfleger completed 5 of 16 passes for 54 yards for the Dragons.“I’ve been a part of teams before where we’d start off 3-0 and finish 3-6,” said Haslett. “I can’t predict the future but I don’t intend for it to happen that way.”Perry 40, Peabody 6Greg McGhee completed 10 of 16 passes for 147 yards and two touchdowns. He also scored on a 10-yard scramble in the first quarter. The Commodores defense forced Peabody’s quarterback, Donte Forte, to throw three interceptions. He finished with 9 of 20 completions for 94 yards and a 28-yard touchdown pass to Sean Momnan in the second quarter.Schenley 24, Oliver 0Schenley picked up its first win Saturday as the defending City League champs beat Oliver 24-0. The Spartans defense was impressive, allowing only 60 yards of total offense from Oliver. They also got good performances from a trio of running backs that produced three touchdowns and 118 yards.“We’ve wanted to be considered a running team for some time now,” said Schenley coach Jason Bell. “We’d like to be consistent with that, running the ball 60 percent and passing the ball 40 percent, and it felt good to see that we’re getting closer to that.“DeAndre Black was on the receiving end of a 71-yard touchdown pass from Calvin Beck in the second quarter. Black also scored on a 4-yard run for the Spartans first score.Running back Shawn Davis made his way back into the lineup after being out for the better part of a month. He carried the ball six times for 43 yards, including a 17-yard score in the third quarter.“I’m just glad to back so I can help our team win,” said Davis.Myles Catlin also scored on a 1-yard run in the fourth quarter. He finished with 26 yards, rushing, on 13 carries.Carrick 42, ­Westinghouse 0Carrick got their first win with an impressive blow­out victory against Westinghouse.Rasheed McKamey had rushing touchdowns of 33, 4 and 2 yards. Quarterback Henry Myers completed 5 of 10 passes for 94 yards, including a touchdown to Zach Roche that went for 38 in the second quarter.Robert Fields scored on a 67-yard interception return. He also went the distance on a punt return from the 40 yard line in the second quarter to put the game out of reach early for the Raiders.(Follow our continuing coverage of City League football and add your comments to our website at www.new­pittsburgh­courieronline.com.) Allderdice 12, Brashear 0Allderdice exceeded its win total for the past two seasons combined with a 12-0 win against Brashear last Thursday at Cupples Stadium.“It seems like we’re starting to wake up here as of late,” said Allderdice’s coach, Jerry Haslett. “We have Peabody next week and I’m not worried too much about what’s behind us. I want to keep pressing forward and win games.” RUNNING WILD—Rasheed McCamey of Carrick ran wild on the Cupples turf against Westinghouse, Sept. 17. McCamey rushed for three touchdowns in the 42-0 win against the Bulldogs. last_img read more

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Controversy Continues Over Charter School

first_imgBy John BurtonRED BANK – A meeting between members of the local press and charter school officials seemed to turn up the heat on the antagonism over the school’s expansion proposal.Principal Meredith Pennotti, Board of Trustees Vice President Roger Foss and school business administrator David Block met with four area reporters on Feb. 10 at the Red Bank Charter School, 58 Oakland St., to offer the school’s perspective on its plans.The school is currently awaiting state Commissioner of Education David Hespe’s decision on its proposal to double enrollment to 400 students over the next three years, as well as expanding its facility space.Charter school officials planned to use its own public forum held earlier this month at recently leased 135 Monmouth St. space to “give the press an open forum” in addition to giving community members a chance to be heard, and for the school to announce it would amend its plan to stagger the future enrollment for the town’s benefit, Pennotti said.But given the large number of people in attendance that night, officials thought it would be better to dedicate the bulk of the time to public comments.“We don’t feel like we met that goal,” of giving reporters a chance to ask questions, Pennotti said.But some countered that the press meeting was an attempt to manipulate local media, to sway public opinion given the vocal opposition the charter school has faced since its plans became public last December.“I just keep feeling they keep reporting the same things over and over without anybody requesting they substantiate their claims,” charged Jared Rumage, Red Bank superintendent of schools.Rumage and others have pointed out that the charter school had an opportunity to present their views at a Jan. 22 forum at the middle school and at their own forum as well, where school officials sat silent as community members spoke. Charter school officials at the last minute decided to decline the invitation to appear at the middle school event, leaving Rumage to present the public school’s point of view.The deadline to submit public comment on the charter school’s proposal to the commissioner of education was Jan. 31. Hespe’s decision is expected by the end of February.“We want to do more for the population of Red Bank,” Pennotti said of the school’s proposal. She pointed to her school’s continuing wait list, currently around 90 students. She added that the public school population is growing, with the schools “bursting at the seams.” She believed the expansion might offer some relief to the existing public school facility.The charter school’s application is on the school’s website and on record with the state Department of Education and available to the public.Much of the two-hour session revolved around points that the school has raised previously and countering some accusations from critics – which also have been expressed before.Rumage and others have said charter school students receive more money per student than their public school counterparts. But administrator Brock said that is misleading, given that actual dollars from the school district equates to less money per student than for the charter school students. The charter school receives an additional roughly a little more than $1 million in direct state aid.That, Rumage had countered, doesn’t negate the impact the charter school funding has on the public school district and what this expansion would mean for the public school and taxpayers – an often repeated refrain from opponents of the plan.“If this goes through, they’re failing to address this main concept,” Rumage said, “we will not be able to provide a thorough and efficient education for the kids who are left behind.”“The charter school is supposed to offer an alternative,” Pennotti offered another often repeated refrain of charter school supporters here and elsewhere. She said her school is providing innovative programs in a small school environment and offering families a choice, “That will attract families.”last_img read more

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Saints added some grit to lineup of two-time defending BCIHL champs

first_imgThe Selkirk Saints added some grit to the lineup for the 2014/15 B.C. Intercollegiate Hockey League season.The Saints announced a playing commitment from forward Tyler Kerner of Taber, Alta., to attend Selkirk College.”Tyler is a hard-working, physical winger who plays the game with lots of energy and competes hard,” head coach Jeff Dubois of the two-time defending BCIHL Champion Saints said. “He really fits the profile of the type of player we were looking to add to what is shaping up as a very skilled group. We see Tyler being a guy who sets a physical tone for us and who makes himself and his line difficult to play against, particularly versus top players on other teams.”Kerner is a 5-foot-11, 205 pound winger who spent the last three seasons in the Alberta Junior Hockey League playing with the Lloydminster Bobcats, Drumheller Dragons and Olds Grizzlys.He split the 2013/14 campaign between Drumheller and Olds, where he scored once while adding nine assists and 85 penalty minutes in 36 regular season and playoff games.Over the course of his Junior A career, Kerner scored nine goals and totaled 32 points and 255 penalty minutes in 112 AJHL games. “I’m very excited to start my post-secondary career with the Saints and join a winning organization,” said Kerner, who describes himself as playing a physical, simple, role game while taking pride in taking care of his own zone first.”I think of myself as a leader who is willing to do whatever it takes to win. I work very well beneath the crease protecting the puck while trying to find players to set up in the offensive zone.” Kerner plans to enter Selkirk’s Business Administration program.”I’m looking forward to moving to the community of Castlegar, as it reminds me of the town I was raised in,” Kerner explains.”The small classes are also a huge benefit, knowing that there will be more attention to help me get the most out of my schooling. My academic goal this year will be to achieve a GPA of 3.5 or higher. On the ice, I want to develop my game while helping my team capture a third straight BCIHL championship.” Kerner is the Saints’ ninth commitment for the 2014/15 season, joining forwards Ryan Edwards (Beaver Valley, KIJHL), Jamie Vlanich (Nelson Leafs, KIJHL), Alex Milligan (Peninsula Panthers, VIJHL), Matt Martin (Ontario Avalanche, WSHL) and Connor Beauchemin (Castlegar Rebels, KIJHL), as well as defencemen Curtis Toneff (Campbell River Storm, VIJHL) and Danny Vlanich (Surrey Eagles, BCHL), and goaltender Steven Glass (Nipawin Hawks, SJHL).last_img read more

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Nelson players earn selection to U15 BC Cup

first_imgThe Nelson players were selected following a vigorous three-day camp during which participants were put through numerous on and off ice training and skills development sessions.Five zones throughout the province hosted more than 300 players during the tryouts. The Nelson players attended a camp in Trail.During the BC Cup, BC Hockey and the Western Hockey League will be putting the players through the WHL Combine Testing.The testing will include on and off ice sessions along with a round robin tournament.  Select players may be invited to the Male U16 Provincial Camp July 11-16, 2017 in Shawnigan Lake.The BC Hockey Male Program of Excellence was introduced in 1980 with the mandate to systematically identify and train the province’s elite-level players for high performance hockey events.The overall objective of the program is to increase the chances of athletes from BC to compete provincially, regionally, nationally and internationally with the ultimate goal being selected to Hockey Canada’s National Junior or National Senior Team. A handful of Nelson boys have advance to the second stage of the BC Hockey Under 15 BC Hockey’s Program of Excellence.Noah Quinn, Kaleb Percival, Joe Davidson and Lowie and Tijs Vreys were selected to attend the U15 BC Cup set for May 11-14 at the South Okanagan Events Centre in Penticton.Eight jamboree style teams have been drafted by BC Hockey evaluators to compete in the tournament. last_img read more

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