The Friday news briefing An ataglance survey of some top stories

first_imgHighlights from the news file for Friday, Oct. 6———BOMBARDIER HIT WITH HEFTY ANTI-DUMPING DUTIES: Bombardier has been slapped with more American duties on exports of its CSeries commercial jet. The American Commerce Department added nearly 80 per cent in preliminary anti-dumping duties. The Montreal-based aircraft manufacturer faces a total tariff of almost 300 per cent when combined with last week’s almost 220 per cent countervailing duties. The duties involve an ongoing dispute with Boeing, which has accused Bombardier of getting unfair subsidies.———COURT GREEN LIGHTS DESTRUCTION OF RESIDENTIAL SCHOOL RECORDS: The Supreme Court of Canada has ruled that records detailing the abuse of former residential school students can eventually be destroyed. It upholds a lower court ruling that said the sensitive material collected for the independent assessments should be destroyed after 15 years. Students provided accounts of physical, sexual and emotional abuse as part of an independent assessment process to provide compensation.———FEDS ANNOUNCE SCOOP COMPENSATION: An Ontario First Nations leader expressed hope Friday that a compensation package for ’60s Scoop survivors will put a stop to Indigenous children being stolen from their culture and identity. Beaverhouse chief Marcia Brown Martel made the comments as the federal government announced $750 million in compensation. Starting in the 1960s, Indigenous children were taken from their homes and placed with non-Indigenous families because officials thought they would get better care.———ECONOMY CONTINUES TO CREATE JOBS: Canada’s jobless rate remained at a nine year low of 6.2 per cent last month after Canada say a net increase of 10,000 new jobs. The rise in full-time work more than offset a drop of part-time jobs, but last month’s net job gain was driven by growth in public-sector employment. CIBC chief economist Avery Shenfeld called the numbers “ho-hum” last month and in line with other signals of a moderation in economic growth.———HOLOCAUST PLAQUE TO BE REDONE: The federal government is redoing a dedication plaque at the National Holocaust Monument in Ottawa after criticism that it fails to mention Jewish victims of the Nazis. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau dedicated the monument last week but the wording was noticed immediately. Martin Sampson of the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs says the government has acknowledged the error and the plaque will be replaced.———SWEDISH MAN ACCUSED OF RAPING GIRLS IN CANADA: A man in Sweden is charged with raping girls in Canada and two other countries entirely through online contact. Swedish prosecutors call it a potentially precedent-setting case. Bjorn Samstrom is currently on trial facing dozens of charges. Prosecutors allege that Samstrom coerced girls to perform sexual acts in front of webcams by threatening them or their families. They say prosecutors reached out to Canadian authorities and the case was brought to the attention of the RCMP, who worked with local police to identify the girls.———MAN PLEADS GUILTY TO THROWING AN OBJECT AT QUEBEC PREMIER: A man who threw something at Quebec Premier Philippe Couillard has pleaded guilty to assault. The incident involving Esteban Torres occurred in 2016 at a vigil for victims of the Orlando massacre. The object in question was never recovered but Torres said at the time it was a ball of paper.———ASSISTED DEATHS ACCOUNT FOR ONE PER CENT OF CANADIAN DEATHS: The federal government says there were nearly 1,200 medically assisted deaths in the first six months of this year. The government says that works out to about 0.9 per cent of all deaths nationally. In the last six months of 2016, the first time medically assisted suicide was legal, there were 803 assisted deaths, or 0.6 per cent of all deaths.———HUMAN WILDLIFE ENCOUNTERS ON THE RISE IN BC: The British Columbia conservation service says there have been more than 20,000 encounters between people and wildlife in the province this year. Officials say more than 14,000 of the complaints were about black bears, 1,500 involved cougars and 430 were about grizzly bears. Nearly 500 bears have been destroyed after run-ins with humans, 469 of them black bears and 27 grizzlies.———POLL SAYS ONLY ONE QUARTER OF RESPONDENTS SAY U.S. HEADING IN RIGHT DIRECTION: Just 24 per cent of Americans now believe the country is heading in the right direction after a tumultuous stretch for President Donald Trump. Recent months have included the threat of war with North Korea, stormy complaints about hurricane relief and Trump’s equivocating about white supremacists. It’s a 10-point drop since June, according to a poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. Nearly 70 per cent of Americans say Trump isn’t level-headed, and majorities say he’s not honest or a strong leader.———last_img read more

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Pakistan pushing 100 terrorists from Afghanistan to Kashmir Valley says intel report

first_imgIndian security personnel guards at the Line of Control (LoC).ReutersIndian intelligence agencies have suggested Pakistan is planning to push 100 ‘hardcore’ terrorists from Afghanistan into the Kashmir Valley. “We have credible intelligence that Pakistan is bringing over 100 hardcore terrorists from Afghanistan and they will be pushed into Kashmir in the next few weeks,” said a military source.It was revealed that Pakistan’s assessments indicated the local terrorists in Kashmir are not adequately trained and have “low shelf-life”, leading to a leadership crisis after their elimination in anti-terror military operations.Abdul Rauf Azhar, the younger brother of Jaish-e-Mohammad chief Maulana Masood Azhar, reportedly held meetings with top commanders at the Bahawalpur headquarters on August 19 and 20 regarding ways of pushing experienced Afghan militants into the valley.Intelligence reports also claimed around 15 Jaish militants are waiting for instructions to infiltrate into Kashmir from terror cells located in Pakistan’s Lipa valley along the Line of Control (LoC).Pakistan-based terror groups are suspected of targeting vital installations in several major cities in the next few weeks, according to the sources. It was also revealed that serial attacks in Kashmir are being planned in an attempt to deceive the international community into showing the deteriorating situation in the valley, following the abrogation of special status granted to Jammu and Kashmir through Article 370.Earlier intelligence reports had stated Pakistan’s Inter-Services Intelligence (ISI) has given JeM full permission for suicide bomb attacks in the valley to cause as many casualties as they can, without worrying about “collateral damage”.Indian security forces have been on high alert following multiple updates on the reactivation of terrorist-training camps in border regions with “backing by the Pakistan army”.Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan has also made ominous statements about a military conflict between the two countries after New Delhi’s decision on Kashmir and said that “Pulwama-like attacks” can be expected. Close IBTimes VideoRelated VideosMore videos Play VideoPauseMute0:01/7:41Loaded: 0%0:01Progress: 0%Stream TypeLIVE-7:40?Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedSubtitlessubtitles settings, opens subtitles settings dialogsubtitles off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window. COPY LINKAD Loading …center_img PM Narendra Modi addressed the nation on Revocation of Article 370last_img read more

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Elephant bird probably wiped out by nest raiders and habitat loss

first_img Citation: Elephant bird probably wiped out by nest raiders and habitat loss (2010, December 21) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-12-elephant-bird-raiders-habitat-loss.html Fifty years ago Sir David collected a giant fossilized egg over 25 cm long and has kept it in his cellar ever since. The bird that laid the egg was around three meters tall, weighed over 450 kg and roamed the island until perhaps as late as a few centuries ago. It is not known what caused the extinction of the elephant bird, but theories include the effects of climate change, human hunting, and the diseases that came with the domesticated fowls that accompanied the humans.Madagascar is an island of the east coast of Africa, which Sir David first visited in 1960 to film an episode of Zoo Quest, a popular TV series. After finding fragments of a fossilized shell, he offered the locals a reward if they could find him more pieces, and a little boy presented him with a complete set of fragments Attenborough later had professionally stuck together.Humans are believed to have arrived in Madagascar about 2,000 years ago, but the elephant bird and humans coexisted for many centuries. Sailors visiting Madagascar in the 17th century returned to Europe with reports of seeing the giant birds, and with samples of the eggs. It is thought that the birds were fully extinct by the early 18th century. Explore further Researchers now believe that most of elephant bird populations had disappeared by about 1,000 years ago and only those in remote parts of the island survived. Dr. Tom Higham of the research laboratory for archaeology at Oxford University said they had dated “quite a few” elephant bird eggs and the youngest they had found was dated at about 900 AD, a time at which the human population was expanding. Sir David had his own fossil egg dated and found it was about 1,300 years old, much older than he had thought.Sir David says there is now compelling evidence the human inhabitants of the island stole the eggs for food, even though they revered the birds themselves, and the nest raiding plus destruction of the native forest habitats led gradually to their extinction. Restoration of Aepyornis maximus. Image credit: Wikipedia. © 2010 PhysOrg.com Elephant Bird Egg, Hungarian Natural History Museum. Scientists tease DNA from eggshell of extinct birds (PhysOrg.com) — Sir David Attenborough has returned to the island of Madagascar to discover the fate of the elephant bird, the largest bird ever to live on Earth, and to make a BBC documentary about it: “Attenborough and the Giant Egg.” Evidence for the theory comes from recent archaeological findings of shells of elephant bird eggs among the remains of ancient camp fires, which suggest the eggs were used for food. At around 150 times the volume of a hen’s egg, one egg would easily feed a number of families.It is unlikely that the giant bird, which was much bigger than today’s ostrich, was hunted to extinction, according to Sir David, who thinks stealing the eggs and loss of habitat were much more likely cause of their demise. In the new documentary Sir David examines the latest evidence and returns to some of the sites he visited 50 years ago, the first time he has deliberately returned to a place he had previously visited. He said 50 years ago the forest in the area was extensive, and now all that is left is an abandoned saw mill. The human population on the island has tripled, and all the previously wild places are being replaced with villages and rice fields. The changes leave many other species, including the rare Lemur, now critically endangered. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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