The Arctic is on fire and these images from space show the

first_img 0 10 Photos NASA Space Sci-Tech Tags Post a comment Share your voicecenter_img NASA sees dramatic Earth weather from space (pictures) Enlarge Image NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Satellite images from NASA and the European Space Agency paint a sobering picture of wildfires burning across Siberia. Fires are typical for this time of year there, but this summer is proving particularly severe. More than 2.7 million hectares (6,671,845 acres) of remote forest is currently burning across six Siberian and Far East regions, according to Russia’s Federal Forestry Agency, covering entire cities with black smoke and noxious fumes. Lumped together, the fire area would be larger than Massachusetts.The above image from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center shows a thick cloud of smoke swirling over Russia and moving toward the US and Canada. ESA’s Copernicus Sentinel-3 also delivered a worrying satellite view of the Siberian smoke plumes.esaEnlarge ImageSome of the Siberian wildfires can be seen in this image captured from space on July 28. The smoke has carried air pollution into the Kemerovo, Tomsk, Novosibirsk and Altai regions. ESA It’s not just Russia that’s on fire. Wildfires have also raged in Greenland and Alaska, fueled by record-breaking temperatures, lightning and strong winds.    NASA is sounding the alarm about how these intense and numerous fires might accelerate melting in the Arctic as soot warms the atmosphere and the burning of decomposed organic material releases megatons of carbon dioxide into the air. Climate change is already hitting the Arctic hard. Greenland watched sea ice melt in June and Arctic permafrost is under threat from thawing.  “One fire here and there is not a big deal, as far as immediate local weather and climate impacts,” Santiago Gassó, an atmospheric scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, said in a statement. “But when you have so many fires continuously emitting, the smoke remains in the atmosphere for so long that it can actually change temperature profiles for several days and has meteorological and climatic impacts.”Last year, satellite images showed smoke from California’s deadly Camp Fire blanketing the state, and another pictured a burn scar left behind by the Woolsey Fire. As global temperatures continue to rise, we’ll likely bear witness to even more smoke-filled views from space. NASA sees fires covering California in a shroud of smoke Smelly, slimy seaweed infestation spotted from space NASA watches wild polar vortex from space Beastly SoCal earthquake created a crack seen from above Earth from spacelast_img read more

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Journey to Dhaka begins

first_imgHolidaymakers are returning home after enjoying Eid vacation. Photo: UNBA crowded Dhaka looked somewhat deserted once people started leaving the capital city to celebrate Eid-ul-Azha at their village homes.The holidaymakers have already started returning to the capital after celebrating the Eid with their families in their hometowns, reports UNB.They are coming back as the weekday begins on Sunday.On Saturday, moderate crowds of people coming back to the city were found at Railway stations, bus and launch terminals.However, the pressure of the returnees is still low, said witnesses and authorities.Alamgir Hossain, ioint director at Naval Traffic, said 70 launches reached Sadarghat Launch terminal from 23 routes from around 7am to 11am on Saturday.He said the number of returning passengers is not that much high yet, but it will increase on Sunday.Trains were running about half an hour behind their schedules on average, causing delay to the departure of the outgoing ones, said Mizanur Rahman, a sub-inspector at Kamalapur Railway Station.Shahidul Islam, a banker who returned from Kushtia by train, told UNB that he along with his family members had to return today (Saturday) as his office and the schools of his kids reopen on Sunday.”There was a less crowd. So, we didn’t have to suffer much except the delayed train,” he added.Meanwhile, ferry services on Shimulia-Kathalbari route were disrupted for two hours from around 4am to 6am due to poor navigability in the Padma river causing immense sufferings to passengers.Ten small ferries are in operation while more than 300 vehicles waiting on both sides of the river, said Khandaker Shah Khaled Newaz, assistant general manager of Bangladesh Inland Water Transport Authority (BIWTA).The dredging worksare going on to solve the navigability problem and soon the ferry services will get back to normalcy, he added.He also said 87 launches and 400 speedboats are transporting passengers on this route.Farhana Dolly, a resident of Shahjahanpur who was returning from Feni, said, it took lesser time to reach Dhaka this time as the highway was relatively free of traffic.As the festive mood of Eid vacation has not lost its charm yet, those who did not leave the city for Eid celebrations enjoyed the city free from traffic jams, noise and crowd.Zarif Rafiul Haque Iraz, a Dhaka city dweller, said Dhaka remains free from traffic only during long vacations, especially during Eid holidays.”This is the reason I along with my friends decided to roam around the city to enjoy crowd-free and traffic-free Dhaka experience,” he added.This year, along with the three-day Eid holidays, most of the holiday makers got additional two days off — Friday and Saturday.Dhaka is expected to get back to its usual bustle on Sunday when people will be returning to the capital in their thousands from Saturday night.last_img read more

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