Champlain College and HR Sentry offer online workshops

first_imgLayoffs – Budget Cuts – Downsizing. Every day there seems to be another news story covering the fallout from the current economic downturn. Today’s economy has created an increasingly challenging environment for human resource administrators. If you are the person responsible for the HR functions of your organization, you may know that there are federal and state employment laws that can help you maneuver through these difficult times – but how familiar are you with them?The Workforce Development Center at Champlain College, in collaboration with HRSentry, is offering a series of online workshops that can answer your questions and give you the skills needed to successfully handle the human resources issues you face every day.Workshops are delivered 100% online, giving you access to the resources and knowledge you need 24/7, on a schedule that works for you.The first workshop, “What You Need to Know about Equal Opportunity in Employment Under the Law”, provides human resource administrators with a perfect overview of current HR laws and regulations, on both the federal and state levels.For a workshop series brochure Click HereKeep your organization safe. Register Now for “What You Need to Know about Equal Opportunity in Employment Under the Law” by Clicking HereHRSentry is HRMade Simplelast_img read more

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Nigeria, Cameroon Go to War in Yaounde

first_imgSoccer Football – Africa Cup of Nations 2019 – Round of 16 – Nigeria v Cameroon – Alexandria Stadium, Alexandria, Egypt – July 6, 2019 Nigeria’s Odion Ighalo in action with Cameroon’s Michael Ngadeu REUTERS/Suhaib Salem VOLLEYBALL OLYMPIC QUALIFIERNigeria women’s volleyball team will face Cameroon today at 7pm in a 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games qualifiers in Yaoundé, Cameroon.The Head Coach of the Nigeria senior women’s volleyball team, Samuel Ajayi, said his wards will go all out when the two teams meet. Ajayi said Nigeria is in a tough group but believes that the country can make it to Tokyo 2020 Olympics.“We are no doubt in the toughest group, but for me we must remain positive and believe we can make it to Japan,” the head coach said.“We all know that Kenya and Cameroon have a lot of quality players in their team and since everybody wants to be at the Olympics, they will be difficult opponents no doubt,” he added.Coach Ajayi, who warned that Botswana cannot be underrated either, also posited that for Nigeria to actualize her dream of making her first ever appearance in Japan, all hands must be on the deck as the coaches, players and officials must all be ready to give their all to this mission.He said, “It is a collective task. We have to recognise the fact that we have good players in our team and we must be ready to give our all.“You don’t expect any easy game at this level and we must work hard to ensure we scale through at the end of the day.”Nigeria will battle North African, Egypt on Tuesday by 4pm before slugging it out with Botswana on Wednesday by 4pm.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

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On hold: Fall athletes try to assess future

first_imgLast Updated: 21st August, 2020 07:18 IST On Hold: Fall Athletes Try To Assess Future Devin Meyrer has the same feelings as many athletes in conferences that have seen their fall seasons postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic. He understands why the decision was made, but he isn’t sure whether it will be feasible to conduct a season in the spring LIVE TV Devin Meyrer has the same feelings as many athletes in conferences that have seen their fall seasons postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic. He understands why the decision was made, but he isn’t sure whether it will be feasible to conduct a season in the spring.The University of Michigan distance runner participates in cross country in the fall, before shifting to indoor track in the winter and the outdoor season in the spring. For some athletes who do both cross country and track, some decisions might have to be made.“We have no idea of how the logistics will work, especially for those of us who compete all three seasons,” Meyrer said. “There are going to be schedule conflicts, but we’ll be ready for any variable.”College athletes who compete in Olympic sports during the fall say they figured their seasons were at risk well before the NCAA and some conferences announced postponements. They also say it was better to make this move in advance than having to shut things down in the middle of a season.Meyrer has been caught in both scenarios. He was running well last year and placed 16th at the NCAA Division I Cross Country meet, but saw his outdoor season canceled two weeks before it started. He also saw teammates not get to compete in the NCAA Indoor Championships, which were canceled after everyone arrived to compete.“For distance runners this means we have lost two consecutive seasons,” he said. “Spring was a shock to the system because everyone had to go home and you lose that team camaraderie. This is more like a slow burn. We were excited to show the work we had done since March even if the opportunity to race was being done in a controlled environment.”Dana Rettke and her Wisconsin volleyball team were well into preparations for another possible Final Four run when the Big Ten’s postponement announcement came on Aug. 11. However, she wasn’t shocked by the outcome because of the increase in COVID-19 cases in the Midwest during the summer.“The chances of having a season were decreasing. There was a bigger fear of knowing if there was going to be a second wave if we were already into the season,” she said.The senior middle blocker, who is the reigning Big Ten Female Athlete of the Year, is trying not to get too wrapped up in what a spring season might look like because too many unknowns remain. Her biggest concern is making sure she follows all the necessary protocols for the two classes she will have that won’t be online.Rettke also hopes they will get a chance to have a season after the Badgers advanced to the national championship game last season before losing to Stanford.“The recent practices honestly were some of the most fun I have had in the gym. Now we have an entire fall semester to prepare which will be beneficial,” Rettke said.While most teams in the Midwest had an opportunity to begin practicing, Stanford’s Catarina Macario and Southern California’s Marcus Longton had not even gotten that far. Local health regulations have restricted most California schools to just conditioning workouts.Macario is a senior forward at Stanford, which is the defending NCAA women’s soccer champion, while Longton is on USC’s water polo team. He is a sophomore driver on the Trojans, who reached the final last year.“As defending national champions we have to set and keep the tone that we will be here and ready to compete,” Macario said. “We will keep training as if things will play out in the spring. Hopefully by then schools and conferences will have figured out a safer way to compete and travel and do the things we used to before.”Another concern is what the field would look like during an NCAA tournament. If the Southeastern and Atlantic Coast conferences decide to compete in the fall, they would be ineligible to be in the tournament.Even if it wasn’t the usual field, Macario stressed that a national title would still be the goal.A spring men’s water polo season could also be compressed due to logistics. Not only would their season be going on at the same time as the women’s, it would also come in the midst of preparations for the rescheduled Tokyo Games, which are supposed to take place next summer.Four members of USC’s men’s team are training with the U.S. team, but the Olympic roster still isn’t set.“The coaches are working to have every player on their best training scenario,” Longton said. “Maybe some guys go compete with their old clubs. Whatever happens all my team is on board if there is any chance to have a season. Every athlete wants to compete.” FOLLOW US WATCH US LIVE Associated Press Television News center_img First Published: 21st August, 2020 07:18 IST COMMENT SUBSCRIBE TO US Written Bylast_img read more

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Labor of love: ‘The Capital of Basketball’ is wife’s lasting tribute to sportswriter John McNamara

first_imgMcNamara was close to finishing that project when he was murdered — one of five victims in the June 2018 mass shooting at the offices of the Capital Gazette newspaper in Annapolis, Md.“I guess for the two months after he died I couldn’t bring myself to go into his den,” Chamblee told Sporting News. “I kept the door closed. I shuddered when I walked past it. He should have been in there working on this book. He was every night when we were home and he wasn’t at a game.“But after about two months I opened the door and tried to remember what it was like when he was there. And the boxes of the files were so conspicuous to see in the middle of the floor — just boxes and boxes of microfiche that he had printed out and telephone numbers he had called. And there was a list of people that he wanted to call back pasted above his desk.“And I decided to take a look to see how far along he had gotten.”McNamara was a staff writer at the Annapolis paper at the time of his death, but his enthusiasm for sports was addressed most nights by wrapping himself in the history of D.C.-area high school basketball. The region long has been extraordinarily rich in basketball talent: Dave Bing, Austin Carr, Adrian Dantley, Victor Oladipo, Danny Ferry, Adrian Branch, Sidney Lowe, Sherman Douglas and Len Bias all were products of its high school teams. There is a listing of all-area teams near the back of “The Capital of Basketball,” starting in the 1920s and carrying forward to 2000, that is loaded with eventual All-Americans, NBA All-Stars and Naismith Hall of Famers.He expressed in the introduction to this book how, already an enormous fan of the NBA and colleges, he came to fall in love with the high school game by attending with his father a matchup of Archbishop Carroll and the private school he had entered, St. John’s. He was “hooked” for life.“In terms of value for your entertainment dollar,” McNamara wrote, “I still believe you can’t beat a good high school basketball game.”McNamara wrote a couple of books about the athletic program at Maryland, his alma mater, one each about football and basketball. Like many writers, he had in his mind a project or two he wanted to address when he found the time. He wanted to write about the history of D.C. high school hoops, but when he learned about the death of legendary coach Bob Dwyer, who had led Archbishop Carroll to 55 consecutive victories in the 1950s, McNamara told his wife he’d missed his chance. She knew better.Chamblee reminded McNamara that Hall-of-Famer Morgan Wootten of DeMatha Catholic and Joe Gallagher of St. John’s were among the elite coaches still around then, with lifetimes of stories to tell. She urged McNamara to contact them and collect their memories and, when the time came, to put it all on paper.“He had been working on it, and I had helped him back up those files, so I knew where they were,” Chamblee said. “He didn’t like me to read his works in progress, but I had put them on a thumb drive and on the cloud and then a few places, so that if we lost one we’d have other backups. I decided to search them out and download them and open them up.“He was so close to finishing. I thought I had to be able to do this for him and finish it.”With help from D.C. area sportswriter David Elfin, who had collaborated with McNamara on “Cole Classics! Maryland Basketball’s Leading Men and Moments,” Chamblee was able to complete the book in time for it to be published as the 2019-20 basketball season commenced.The idea of the book was to cover the 20th century, ending with Wootten’s induction into the Naismith Memorial Hall of Fame in 2000. He’d covered all but the final two years of the 1990s, and Chamblee said Elfin was an enormous help in addressing those seasons and proofreading the entire work. The opening chapter covering 1900-1950 was not yet done, but McNamara had so thoroughly outlined what he had planned, Chamblee said, “Really, all I had to do was turn his outline into complete sentences and write it the way he would want it to be written.”The completed work is a tribute to McNamara’s encyclopedic knowledge of the basketball scene in the D.C. metro area. It is published by Georgetown University Press. Academic houses often prefer the work they produce to have been peer-reviewed before publication. But no one could find a “peer” in this arena; McNamara was the authority.Chamblee is a former newspaper reporter who became an attorney and now works as senior regulatory counsel for the Food and Drug Administration. She was out of work, temporarily, during the government shutdown earlier this year, but that provided her time to finish her husband’s book project.“If the government hadn’t shut down for those six weeks, I don’t think we’d be talking about this book today,” she said. “I couldn’t take on another job — that’s not allowed — so I just worked 12-hour days finishing the book.”Some of what was required was identifying the subjects of photographs; McNamara didn’t always write them down because he’d have known them at a glance. Chamblee got some help from other writers and credited Wootten and Maryland basketball voice Johnny Holliday for being generous with their time in helping to assure accuracy. Hall of Fame coach Gary Williams, who coached at Maryland from 1989-2011, agreed to write the foreword, explaining he got to know McNamara on a professional level, “and then as a friend.” There is a special feeling for an author when the first copy of a book arrives, usually in the mail or by courier service. So many years of labor can go into such a project, and to hold it all in one’s hands is an extraordinary experience. Few, though, have felt anything like what Chamblee did when “The Capital of Basketball” was delivered to her.“I was so conflicted when I held that book in my hand,” Chamblee said. “Of course, these days you email off the files, so even just hitting the send button on the files felt like I was letting it go. Maybe it feels a little like a parent dropping their child off at college.“And when it came back, part of me wanted to keep it like this was my secret between John and I, and I didn’t want to share it. But certainly, I knew I needed to share it. John wanted people to know these stories, so I have to let it go.” For about two months, the last words John McNamara had to share with his readers — words that represented over a decade’s worth of research, conversation, investigation and, above all, passion — sat untouched in his office.In 2007, he began the project that would become “The Capital of Basketball” at the urging of his wife, Andrea Chamblee. She knew was no one was more qualified to write the history of the incredible high school basketball competition that has flourished for over a century in the Washington D.C. metro area.last_img read more

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Spurs beat Knicks, Popovich alone in 5th for coaching wins

first_imgSan Antonio Spurs forward LaMarcus Aldridge (12) puts up a shot against New York Knicks forward Michael Beasley (8) during the third quarter of an NBA basketball game, Tuesday, Jan. 2, 2018, in New York. The Spurs won 100-91. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson)NEW YORK — He’s now the fifth-winningest coach in NBA history, though there are some things Gregg Popovich still doesn’t know.Like what everybody was yelling about after Manu Ginobili’s overthrown pass, for example.ADVERTISEMENT Hectic EPL schedule will ‘kill’ the players, warns Guardiola Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award “They just for 48 minutes played consistently,” Porzingis said. “They talk on defense. And they also know when they need to push the pace and when they need to slow it down.”The Knicks led 29-25 after one quarter but couldn’t break 20 points in either of the next two. The Spurs began to pull away midway through the third, which ended with confusion.Ginobili, the Argentine veteran who got some loud cheers as he often does while playing in New York, appeared to be attempting a lob pass from beyond the 3-point line to Aldridge, but the pass went over his head. Beasley grabbed it and began dribbling up the court as Ginobili and other Spurs waved frantically to the officials that the ball had actually gone into the basket.“It went so clean that nobody saw it and I went crazy because once you make a shot like that, you want it to count,” Ginobili said. “So yeah, it was very awkward, but common sense, I guess. The refs reviewed it and we got it.”Referees eventually credited the basket to Ginobili — but only for two points. The basket was reviewed after the quarter ended and counted as a 3-pointer, giving San Antonio an 81-67 lead.Leonard played 30 minutes for the first time this season. It was just his seventh game after his return from a quadriceps injury. He shot 8 for 20 and grabbed eight rebounds.“I felt good,” he said. “Still got a little bit of ways to go as far as my conditioning, legs, just the whole rhythm of the game, figuring out things.”TIP-INSSpurs: Leonard missed his first five 3-point attempts, and then made his final three. … Danny Green, who has battled a left groin injury, didn’t play in the second half and Popovich indicated he may be shut down to rest.Knicks: G Ron Baker missed the game because of a broken left orbital bone sustained when he was hit in the face trying to stop Anthony Davis’ drive to the basket in New York’s victory at New Orleans on Saturday. Coach Jeff Hornacek said Baker took part in the non-contact portion of practice Monday but the mask he was fitted for to wear in games wasn’t available yet. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Knicks: Visit Washington on Wednesday.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next LATEST STORIES Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours NEW YEAR, SAME OL’ SPURSThe calendar has changed but the Spurs rarely do. Tim Duncan is gone, but Ginobili (40) and Tony Parker (35) are still around in 2018.“I still miss Timmy and Manu will go at some point, maybe in the next five, six years,” Popovich joked. “Tony, he thinks he’s going to play for 10 more. Those contracts are pretty good.”BAD FIRST IMPRESSIONPopovich didn’t want Parker after the Frenchman’s first workout as a teenager.“I thought he was soft, I thought he didn’t care, I thought he thought he was too cool for school and I said no and we sent him out of town,” Popovich said.He agreed to give Parker another workout and came away impressed by his toughness.“If you have time to go through all that, I guess you learn a little bit and it might help you take a chance on someone,” Popovich said.UP NEXTSpurs: Visit Philadelphia on Wednesday. LaMarcus Aldridge scored 29 points and Kawhi Leonard had a season-high 25 for the Spurs. Ginobili finished with 12 points — three of them coming on what appeared to be a pass that went into the basket without everyone noticing.“He makes magic happen,” Aldridge said. “He’s the only 40-year-old that can make plays like he does every night.”The Spurs beat the Knicks for the second time in six days and won for the fourth time in five games. They beat New York 119-107 on Dec. 28.Michael Beasley had 18 points for the Knicks, who were playing one of just four home games this month. They play 12 times on the road.Kristaps Porzingis shot just 5 for 19 and was one of three Knicks to finish with 13 points.ADVERTISEMENT Brian Heruela arrival bolsters Phoenix backcourt, defense Jiro Manio arrested for stabbing man in Marikina MOST READ OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ’a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Meralco ‘never the same’ after Almazan injury in PBA Finals OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ’a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Judy Ann’s 1st project for 2020 is giving her a ‘stomachache’ View comments He was just as fooled initially as the referees and didn’t realize the ball had gone in the basket, the most bizarre bucket of San Antonio’s 100-91 victory over the New York Knicks on Tuesday night.“I did not, in all honestly. I did not,” Popovich said. “Then everybody started grabbing me and saying the ball went in. I said, ‘Yeah, the ball went in!’ I acted like I knew what was going on.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkHe almost always does.Popovich earned his 1,176th victory, all with the Spurs. The five-time champion broke a tie with his friend George Karl. Redemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie Thompson Scottie Thompson also worthy of Finals MVP, thinks Conelast_img read more

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