My Birthday Mixed with Disheartening

first_imgMr. Editor:One of the best treats you could give me on my birthday will be to publish my views in your widely read newspaper. Thanks for the space.Today Friday, November 14, 2014 marks my 50th birthday anniversary, but I am observing this milestone in my life with mixed reactions.Indeed, I am grateful to God for sparing my life to see this day, but I am also imbued with excruciating pains to see the dreadful trend in which Liberia, our mother land is taking.How disheartening it is to see Liberia retrogresses in achieving its development goals. What a pity that in a country of abundance of resources, a vast majority of Liberians still live in abject poverty while a privileged few enjoy unprecedented luxury?Many government officials entrusted with the mantle of authority to effectively manage the resources of the nation for the great benefits of all Liberians have over the years engaged in the systematic corruption which has heightened poverty and misery amongst ordinary Liberians.Without the shadow of doubt, the case of forging development in Liberia is proving to be a stubborn one owing to two basic reasons: Firstly, because the policymakers and planners in Liberia are almost always playing “deaf ears” to analytical views from critical thinkers expressed to see Liberia’s development enhanced; and secondly, bulk of the Liberian people have decided to play the role of spectators rather than play pro-active role in the nation building process.It is a pity that Liberia can show hardly anything, speaking in terms of development, after 167 long years of independence.The blunt reality is that Liberia will probably observe two or more centuries of independence without accomplishing any development if Liberians from all walks of life fail to reconcile their divergent views, and strategize the way forward to national growth and development.Let me close with an excerpt from Rev. Martin Luther Kings’ “Letter from Birmingham Jail” written on April 16, 1963: “We will have to repent in this generation not merely for the hateful words and actions of the bad people, but for the appalling silence of the good people.” Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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GPF hands over cash, hamper to Commander Robinson

first_imgCommander of G Division (Essequibo Coast-Islands), Superintendent Crystal Robinson, who suffered tremendous losses after a fire of unknown origin razed her Stewartville, West Coast Demerara (WCD) property last weekend was the recipient of an undisclosed sum of cash and a food hamper from the Guyana Police Force.Acting Police Commissioner Nigel Hoppie, DSM, hands over the cheque to Commander RobinsonActing Police Commissioner Nigel Hoppie, DSM, handed over the items to Robinson in the Commissioner’s Conference Room in the presence of several senior officers and once again assured of the Force’s commitment in supporting victims of disasters.Robinson was extremely pleased for the assistance and expressed sincere thanks to the Guyana Police Force for its support.last_img

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Delta American and United ban shipments of big five hunting trophies

first_imgAccording to NBC News, a United spokesman said Monday that the airline was also prohibiting big-game shipments. The airline did not immediately respond to The Washington Post’s request for comment Tuesday morning.The bans by the three major U.S. carriers were announced amid mounting international outrage over the hunting death of one of Africa’s most iconic lions, Cecil, who was killed in Zimbabwe by a U.S. big-game hunter. Walter Palmer, a Minnesota dentist, has said he had “no idea that the lion I took was a known, local favorite.”“I relied on the expertise of my local professional guides to ensure a legal hunt,” he said last week in a statement obtained by the Minneapolis Star Tribune.See also: Rich US tourists kill hundreds of lions each year, and it’s all legalDelta isn’t the first airline to take such action. Emirates Airlines announced a similar ban earlier this year, for example.“Lions, elephants and the other species that make up the Africa Big Five belong on the savanna, not on the walls and in home museums of wealthy people who spend a fortune to kill the grandest, most majestic animals in the world,” Wayne Pacelle, president and CEO of the Humane Society of the United States, said in a statement. “Delta has set a great example, and no airline should provide a getaway vehicle for the theft of Africa’s wildlife by these killers.”The Humane Society had urged the airline industry “to join the international fight to end trophy hunting.”As The Washington Post’s Christopher Ingraham reported, wealthy U.S. tourists account for the majority of lions killed for sport in Africa. A 2011 report by the International Fund for Animal Welfare found that between 1999 and 2008, Americans brought home lion trophies (including heads and pelts) representing 64 percent of all African lions killed for sport during that period.And that number is rising: “Of these trophies, the number imported into the U.S. in 2008 was larger than any other year in the decade studied and more than twice the number in 1999,” the report found.“In Africa overall,” the report says, Americans “make up the greatest number” of big-game hunters targeting the big five, as well as animals such as antelopes and zebras — “particularly in countries where hunting safaris are expensive.”The Zimbabwe Conservation Task Force, a nongovernmental organization, believes that Cecil was lured off the Hwange National Park — land on which he was protected.In the aftermath of the hunt, protesters gathered at Palmer’s dental practice, and his membership to Safari Club International was suspended. He’s largely remained out of sight, though a representative has made contact with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service officials.On Sunday, Zimbabwe’s National Parks and Wildlife Management Authority accused a second U.S. doctor, Jan Seski, of illegally killing a lion in April. The wildlife authority said Seski killed the animal — without approval — with a bow and arrow on land where it was not allowed, near Zimbabwe’s Hwange National Park, according to the Associated Press.Washington Post staff writer Peter Holley contributed to this article.© 2015, The Washington Post Facebook Comments Effective immediately, we will no longer transport buffalo, elephant, leopard, lion or rhino trophies.— American Airlines (@AmericanAir) August 4, 2015 Related posts:US dentist named as killer of Zimbabwe’s beloved Cecil the lion Rich US tourists kill hundreds of lions each year, and it’s all legal US government sued over sea turtles snared in shrimp nets To conserve the Amazon, the forest must become an economic ‘asset’center_img Delta Air Lines, American Airlines and United Airlines will no longer allow the shipment of lion, leopard, elephant, rhinoceros and buffalo hunting trophies, the U.S. carriers said Monday.Delta, which announced its ban first in an afternoon statement, said it was “effective immediately.”“Prior to this ban, Delta’s strict acceptance policy called for absolute compliance with all government regulations regarding protected species,” the carrier said. “Delta will also review acceptance policies of other hunting trophies with appropriate government agencies and other organizations supporting legal shipments.”Late Monday night, American Airlines announced its own ban on shipments of trophies from the animals that comprise what hunters frequently call “the big five.”last_img read more

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