FDA issues warning on raw-milk soft cheeses

first_img See also: Editor’s note: Based on a Food and Drug Administration news release, the original version of this story incorrectly listed Ranchero as one type of soft cheese that may be made from raw milk The FDA later issued a clarification saying that Ranchero is a trademark of the Cacique Co. of Industry, Calif., for a cheese made with pasteurized milk. Listeriosis, brucellosis, salmonellosis, and tuberculosis are among the illnesses the cheeses can spread, the agency said in a news release. Especially at risk are pregnant women, newborns, the elderly, and people with weakened immune systems. Mar 14 FDA news releasehttp://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/2005/ucm108420.htm Particularly hazardous are raw-milk soft cheeses from Mexico and Central American countries, the agency said. It recommended that consumers not eat any unripened, raw-milk soft cheeses from Mexico, Nicaragua, or Honduras. “Data show that they are often contaminated with pathogens,” the statement said. Mar 16, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – Soft cheeses made with raw milk can cause several serious infectious diseases, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned this week. “Recently, cases of tuberculosis in New York City have been linked to consumption of queso fresco style cheeses, either imported from Mexico or consumed in Mexico, contaminated with Mycobacterium bovis,” the statement said. The agency also warned against eating raw-milk soft cheeses bought at flea markets or from door-to-door sellers or carried in luggage from Mexico, Nicaragua, or Honduras. Raw-milk soft cheese from any source carries some risk, officials added. Queso fresco–style cheeses, popular among Hispanics, include Queso Panela, Asadero, and Blanco, among other types, according to the FDA. They may be imported or produced in the United States.last_img read more

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Tony Stewart

first_imgMost of you know by now of the incident that caused Tony Stewart to miss part of this years’ NASCAR racing season.  In a dirt-track race in New York his car was involved in a mishap with a car driven by Kevin Ward, Jr.  After Ward hit the wall, he jumped out of his car and ran down the track to confront Stewart’s car which was still racing.  The result was a violent collision that killed the young New York driver.Immediately after the race, Stewart was examined by a race doctor and cleared because it was obvious he was not under the influence of any outside substances.  However, when the autopsy was complete on Kevin Ward, it was determined that he had a high amount of marijuana in his system.  When the final verdict was released by a grand jury, Ward was determined to be what is generally called “high”.It is a shame that Columbus, Indiana’s, Tony Stewart will have to live with this for the rest of his life, and it is quite obvious that Stewart has been drastically affected by this.  If you are not familiar with dirt track racing, the track surface is very slick and the control of these cars is very limited.  You literally slide around the short track surfaces.  It will not bring Ward back, but his actions on the track “seem” to indicate that he might not have been completely in control of his actions.last_img read more

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