Westport Winery Savoring the Gold in Oregon

first_imgFacebook8Tweet0Pin0Westport Winery more gold medals or higher than any other winery at the 2017 Savor NW Wine Competition held the first week of March in Cannon Beach, Oregon. This competition is a precursor to the popular Savor Cannon Beach Food & Wine Festival that will be held on March 9-12. Westport will be pouring all of their award-winning wines at their Cannon Beach tasting room during this event.The Best of Class Gewurztraminer medal was awarded to Captain Gray. The grapes for this wine were harvested in 2015 at Red Willow Vineyard in the Yakima Valley AVA. A portion of the proceeds from this wine benefits the Grays Harbor Symphony and Bishop Performing Arts Center in Aberdeen. The sculpture commemorating this wine was created by Westport ceramic artist Kimmi Kerns. The label is a portrait of the winery by watercolorist Barbara Sampson. Rapture of the Deep, Westport’s 100% sparkling cranberry wine, earned Best of Class in the non-grape wine category. The photograph on this wine’s label is by winery co-owner Blain Roberts. Its sculpture was created by Johnny and Darlene Camp of Opal Art Glass in Cosmopolis. This wine benefits Harbors Home Health & Hospice. Double gold medals were bestowed upon Maritime Sparkling Riesling, Ancient Mariner Pear Riesling, and Swimmer Petite Sirah. The Riesling grapes were also harvested at Red Willow Vineyard, while the Petite Sirah was hand-picked at Olsen Brothers Estate Vineyard near Benton City, Washington. These wines benefit the Northwest Carriage Museum, Coastal Animal Rescue & Adoption (CARA), and the Grays Harbor Children’s Advocacy Center, respectively. Both the Maritime and Ancient Mariner labels were painted by watercolorist Darryl Easter, while the Swimmer label features a childhood photo of Dana Roberts, Westport’s director of winemaking.Additional gold medals were earned by Shiver Me Timbers, a blend of Riesling, passionfruit, orange and guava; Lighthouse, a dry Riesling from Red Willow Vineyard; and Charterboat Chick, the winery’s rich Cabernet Sauvignon. In 2016 Westport Winery was honored as one of the top twenty most admired wineries in North America by Winery & Vineyard Management Magazine. It was named 2011 Washington Winery to Watch by Wine Press Northwest. They have been voted Best Winery by King 5 Evening Magazine six times. They were named the Best Washington Family Business Silver Medal winners in 2012, received the Grays Harbor Environmental Stewardship Award in 2015, and were name Best Winery, Best Wine Shop, and Best Boutique Winery for 2016 by South Sound Magazine. Family-friendly Westport Winery Garden Resort, is located on the corner of Highway 105 and South Arbor Road halfway between Aberdeen and Westport. The resort (including the restaurant, bakery, plant nursery and 15-acre display garden) is open daily or breakfast, lunch and dinner from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Westport Winery’s second location, TASTING @ Cannon Beach, is located at 255 N. Hemlock. The Oregon tasting room is open daily from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. For more information or reservations call 360-648-2224.last_img read more

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Food Stamp Applications Up By 83 Percent in Monmouth County

first_img“SALLY” IS A single mother who had been working as a caseworker for a mental health counseling facility for adults, until she became a victim of downsizing and has spent the last two years unemployed. Things were tough for her while collecting unemployment insurance, but that has ended and Sally has had to do what she could to provide food for herself and her 6-year-old daughter. And that meant getting what has traditionally been called food stamps, public assistance to help her stretch her exceedingly meager budget.Sally is not the real name of the 40-year-old Neptune resident and college graduate, but she asked that her name be withheld. Sally’s story has become more common here in Monmouth County.“You just feel so helpless; sometimes it feels so hopeless,” she said recently.Kathleen Weir, the deputy director of the Monmouth County Division of Social Services, shared the startling news that her offices has seen an 83 percent increase since Oct. 2009 in active case loads for the Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program, or SNAP, previously known as food stamps, a federally funded public assistance program. According to Weir the current number of active cases as of last month stands at 16,585. By active case, Weir explained that the number of those applying has remained fairly consistent since 2009, but this indicates more are meeting the eligibility requirements.On the state level, enrollment has increased by more than 24 percent, by about 150,000 individuals, from March 2010 to March 2011, according to information provided by Nicole Brossoie, assistant commissioner of public affairs for the New Jersey Department of Human Services.During that same time period, according to Brossoie, the number of households on the program grew by a little more than 25 percent or about 80,000 additional homes.When money gets tight, when people try to live on less as they lose their jobs or find themselves in difficult straits, they will make changes, cut expenses. But “Food is not a discretionary expense. You need it to live,” this week said Arti Sinha, a Monmouth County human services specialist.Sinha said the makeup of the clients has been changing in these last few economically difficult years. “I’ve seen more retirees then I did in the past,” as those on fixed incomes try to address the rising cost of groceries. “I’m seeing younger families who in the past were able to make it,” but now can’t, she said.“I had people in the past say, ‘There are people who need it more than me. I’m not going to apply. But now I need it,’” Sinha said of her experiences. “That is the phrase I keep hearing over and over, that people are coming because they must, it’s imperative.”“It’s very said.”There has also been a change in some of the geography. There are traditional pockets within the county, most of them in the eastern portion, where clients would live. Now, though, “We’ve seen a lot of clients that we would never have seen in the past,” from some of the western and affluent communities, such as Manalapan and Marlboro, Allentown, Millstone, she said.“We’ve definitely seen quite an influx,” she said.A family of four would qualify for SNAP if their gross income level doesn’t exceed $3,447 per month. And families can include children up to age 22. “If you live together and eat together you are considered part of the same household,” according to Sinha. There are other deductions available for housing, utilities and medical expenses. At that income level a family would be eligible for $668 a month from the program for food. And “the bigger the household size, the higher the income threshold,” she said.But for some that allowance isn’t enough to carry them through the month, forcing them to go to food pantries.One woman told Sinha how she buys mac and cheese and frozen hot dogs for her three young children. “’I buy things based on how long I can make them last,’” she told Sinha.“You’re buying based on that it’s filling, rather than maybe nutritional, and you look for what’s on sale,” Sinha said, relating her clients’ experience.Sinha and her colleagues have seen their caseloads triple, which has its impact on them as well. “Everyone’s story is so compelling,” and she and her co-workers worry about suffering from compassion fatigue. “You wake up at 3 o’clock [a.m.] thinking about finishing a case,” she said.“I truly feel for families with children and the elderly,” Sinha said. “They are the most vulnerable of our population.”Sally in her work sometimes would have to assist other vulnerable populations, those emotionally and mentally challenged, to maneuver the system to get them benefits, never thinking she would be in a similar situation she said.“I’ve heard a lot of complaints,” from those that had been her clients. Some lived in single room occupancy hotels, under housing vouchers. But those facilities usually don’t allow hot plates or refrigerators, and the food program doesn’t allow clients to purchase prepared foods, making it difficult for them, she said.SNAP also doesn’t cover paper products, which can be another problem for people, Sally said.Sally has been surviving on intermittent work in her field and some help from her family. But looking for work has been “horrible” and she and her daughter will have to move in with her parents.For now the food stamps provide a necessary lifeline, but “It’s limited, it’s once a month and it’s never enough,” she said.last_img read more

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A Day of Fun and Fond Memories in LS

first_imgLITTLE SILVER – It was a fun day but for many of those attending the Little Silver Men’s One Pitch Tourna­ment, it was also a day to remember their friend and neighbor.This year’s event was in honor of Jonathan Bitman, a borough resident, borough councilman and a longtime member of the Little Silver Crocs, the over-40 softball team, who died on Sept. 4 at age 52 after battling pancreatic cancer.The tournament, held Saturday, Sept. 29, on the sports fields behind borough hall and the public library, featured the usual softball games, cheers and shouts of players and spectators, music, laughter and conversations, along with the sizzle of grills cooking burgers and hot dogs. It was a great day for the participants, families and community members but for some, including event organizers Doug Glassmacher and Peter Roskowinski, it was a bittersweet day with Bitman’s absence felt by those who knew him.According to Glassmacher and Roskowinski, Bitman was a member of the Crocs since the team was formed more than a decade ago.“Jon was a catcher,” Glassmacher said. “He was like Yogi Berra back there,” joking and trash talking with teammates and to the batters.As a catcher, Bitman was “very effective” and always batted in the same spot in the lineup – last, Roskowinski said.During this year’s tournament there were six Little Silver teams, one from Rumson and another from Shrewsbury competing in a series of games with batters facing one pitch, which allowed for quite a few games during the day, Glassmacher said.The day was – and has been – more than about softball. Bitman always saw it as a sort of community day, with music, food, and activities for the kids.“Our motto is ‘there’s more to being a Croc than playing ball,’” Glassmacher said. “Like Jon, we’re very community-oriented.”“All I can say is Jon would have been the first person setting things up” and he always spent time behind the grill, said Little Silver resident Chris Curley. “He’s still here in spirit.”“It’s a sad day,” resident Cindy Mendoza said, “but it’s a good day.”Mendoza has been a “Crocette,” one of the women who help out, since the beginning. “I’m one of the originals,” she said as she sold 50/50 tickets.She acknowledged that residents of the borough are usually quick to answer the call for help when situations arise. “That’s what impressed me about this town,” she said. “People do step up.”Rich Movelle, who lives in Tinton Falls, played for the Rumson team. About six years ago the event was dedicated to helping a member of his team who was stricken with ALS. Movelle said that while he takes his softball seriously, “the game is not as important as the money to help the family.”“He did love the Crocs,” said Bitman’s sister, Paige Ascher of Maplewood.“And he always enjoyed a good burger,” said Russ Ascher, Paige’s husband, jokingly recalling his brother-in-law.“He would be the first one out here to help another person,” Paige Ascher said. “This really is a fitting tribute to him.”The proceeds raised throughout the day and afterward will go to help Bitman’s daughter, Cori, a college sophomore, continue her education, Roskowinski said.The fundraising had gone well and “exceeded our expectations,” Roskowinski said after the event.People can still contribute by mail to the Jon Bitman Memorial Fund, P.O. Box 143, Little Silver, NJ 07739; or through sites.google.com/site/lscrocs/home. By John BurtonJon Bitman remembered at softball tournamentlast_img read more

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Controversy Continues Over Charter School

first_imgBy John BurtonRED BANK – A meeting between members of the local press and charter school officials seemed to turn up the heat on the antagonism over the school’s expansion proposal.Principal Meredith Pennotti, Board of Trustees Vice President Roger Foss and school business administrator David Block met with four area reporters on Feb. 10 at the Red Bank Charter School, 58 Oakland St., to offer the school’s perspective on its plans.The school is currently awaiting state Commissioner of Education David Hespe’s decision on its proposal to double enrollment to 400 students over the next three years, as well as expanding its facility space.Charter school officials planned to use its own public forum held earlier this month at recently leased 135 Monmouth St. space to “give the press an open forum” in addition to giving community members a chance to be heard, and for the school to announce it would amend its plan to stagger the future enrollment for the town’s benefit, Pennotti said.But given the large number of people in attendance that night, officials thought it would be better to dedicate the bulk of the time to public comments.“We don’t feel like we met that goal,” of giving reporters a chance to ask questions, Pennotti said.But some countered that the press meeting was an attempt to manipulate local media, to sway public opinion given the vocal opposition the charter school has faced since its plans became public last December.“I just keep feeling they keep reporting the same things over and over without anybody requesting they substantiate their claims,” charged Jared Rumage, Red Bank superintendent of schools.Rumage and others have pointed out that the charter school had an opportunity to present their views at a Jan. 22 forum at the middle school and at their own forum as well, where school officials sat silent as community members spoke. Charter school officials at the last minute decided to decline the invitation to appear at the middle school event, leaving Rumage to present the public school’s point of view.The deadline to submit public comment on the charter school’s proposal to the commissioner of education was Jan. 31. Hespe’s decision is expected by the end of February.“We want to do more for the population of Red Bank,” Pennotti said of the school’s proposal. She pointed to her school’s continuing wait list, currently around 90 students. She added that the public school population is growing, with the schools “bursting at the seams.” She believed the expansion might offer some relief to the existing public school facility.The charter school’s application is on the school’s website and on record with the state Department of Education and available to the public.Much of the two-hour session revolved around points that the school has raised previously and countering some accusations from critics – which also have been expressed before.Rumage and others have said charter school students receive more money per student than their public school counterparts. But administrator Brock said that is misleading, given that actual dollars from the school district equates to less money per student than for the charter school students. The charter school receives an additional roughly a little more than $1 million in direct state aid.That, Rumage had countered, doesn’t negate the impact the charter school funding has on the public school district and what this expansion would mean for the public school and taxpayers – an often repeated refrain from opponents of the plan.“If this goes through, they’re failing to address this main concept,” Rumage said, “we will not be able to provide a thorough and efficient education for the kids who are left behind.”“The charter school is supposed to offer an alternative,” Pennotti offered another often repeated refrain of charter school supporters here and elsewhere. She said her school is providing innovative programs in a small school environment and offering families a choice, “That will attract families.”last_img read more

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Holmdel Theater’s ‘Pink Unicorn’ Takes on Gender Issues

first_imgTony Award-winner Alice Ripley stars in the one-woman play “The Pink Unicorn” at Holmdel Theatre Jan. 30-31. Photo courtesy Holmdel Theatre Co. Cook is also a producer for “The Pink Unicorn.” Amy E. Jones is director and Tina Scariano is stage manager. Ripley is looking forward to spreading a message of love, hope and understanding with the Holmdel audience. “There’s no doubt thisreally rocks Trisha’s world,”said Ripley. “It blindsides her.I don’t have any kids, but I’mhonored to be chosen as thevoice for this character. WhatTrisha is going through, a lotof people are facing.” “I can’t wait to tell this important and timely story with the brilliant Alice Ripley and this incredible team again,” she said. Arts and entertainment reporter Mary Ann Bourbeau can be reached at mbourbeau@tworivertimes.com. Ripley won critical acclaim for her performance as Diana Goodman in the Pulitzer Prize-winning show, “Next to Normal,” for which she took home the 2009 Tony Award for Best Actress in a Musical. She also appeared on Broadway in “Side Show” (Tony nomination), “American Psycho,” “The Rocky Horror Show,” “Sunset Boulevard,” “The Who’s Tommy” and “Les Miserables.” “The Pink Unicorn” was originally produced in 2013 by DogTown Theatre in Washington, D.C. and has since been performed throughout the U.S. and Canada, including a run at United Solo Theatre Festival in New York, where Elise Forier Edie won Best Storyteller. The show was produced Off-Broadway in 2018 by Out of the Box Theatrics and starred Ripley. HOLMDEL – What does a Christian widow living in a conservative Texas town do when her teenage daughter announces she is gender queer and is starting a chapter of the Gay Straight Alliance in her high school? Tickets for “The Pink Unicorn” are $50 and can be purchased at holmdeltheatrecompany.org or by calling the box office at 732-946-0427. “I took one look at the script and it didn’t take me long to say yes,” she said. Liz Flemming, producing consultant and artistic director for Out of the Box Theatrics, is excited to revisit “The Pink Unicorn” with Ripley at the Holmdel Theatre Company’s Duncan Smith Theater. “It’s OK to make mistakes along the way,” she said. “Nobody’s perfect. But if Trisha has to choose between the church and her daughter, it’s no contest.” center_img By Mary Ann Bourbeau “A lot of people are dealing with this issue and it’s important to feel like you can talk about it,” she said. “It’s a happy ending, but it’s not easy getting there. Hopefully, seeing Trisha going through what she goes through will give the audience courage.” This crisis of gender issues is one that Trisha Lee never saw coming. Tony Award winner Alice Ripley brings Trisha to life in a one-woman play called “The Pink Unicorn,” which will be presented as part of Broadway at the Barn at the Holmdel Theatre Jan. 30 and 31. The story begins as amonologue and turns intoan immersive play in whichTrisha makes a lot of wrongchoices, but also a lot ofright choices, said Ripley. “It really hits people in theheart,” she said. “It’s hardfor a kid to say somethinglike that to their parent. Thishelps people understand thatit’s important to keep talkingabout it, and maybe it willhelp give them an idea of thekind of language to use. Wesee this as an introductionto the conversation. If you’recoming from a place of love,that’s a good place to start.” “We are thrilled to have Alice Ripley back in the Barn,” said Colleen Cook, Holmdel Theatre Company’s executive director. In June 2019, she kickedoff Holmdel Theatre’s“Broadway at the Barn”series with her solo show,“Ripley Prescription,” whichwas recently named BestCabaret Performance in the2019 BroadwayWorld NewJersey Awards. Ripley said the humor inflected in Elise Forier Edie’s script helps Trisha get through this situation and come to a place of understanding and acceptance. This article originally appeared in the Jan. 23, 2020 print edition of The Two River Times.last_img read more

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Glacier athletes complete season in style at Kootenay Zones

first_imgBy The Nelson Daily SportsThe Glacier Gymnastics club culminated an impressive season on the balance beam by hosting the Kootenay Zone Championships at the Civic Centre facility.Teams from throughout the zone joined the host from the Heritage City in the annual windup competition to the local gymnastic season.The zones were held over two days with competition in boys, girl’s pre-competitive, interclub and high school events.Glacier results included:Level 1 Argo 2002 Alexis Dyck, first on bars, second on floor and beam and first overall; Senna Moroney, first on beam, second overall; Teigan Barnhart, first vault, third overall; and Gwen McCrory second on bars first on floor, third on beam.Level 1 Argo 2001Ohia Wintraub, first on beam and bars, secnd on floor and vault, second overall; Olivia Kelly, third on floor, fourth on beam, third overall; Ashley Caponero, second on floor, fifth overall and Mimi Lockhurst, third on beam, fifth on floor and sixth all overall.Level 1 Tyro (10 & 11yrs old)Sara Tolles, first on vault, floor and beam, second overall and Brenna Barnhart, second on floor, third on vault and bars and third overall.Level 1 Novice & Open combinedKaya Fraser, first on beam, second overall; Maddie Sternloff, second beam, third on floor, fourth overall; Miranda Boisvert, fourth on beam, sixth overall and Katie Poetsch, third on beam and fourth on floor.Level 2 TyroBryn Walsh, first on bars and floor, second overall; Kylee Dyck, second on floor, third on Bars, third overall; Victoria Lawrence-Jeffery, second on beam, fourth on floor, fifth overall and Hailey Lothrop, third on beam and sixth overall.Level 2 NoviceChultim O’Neil was first vault, bars, floor and first overall; and Bronwyn Sutherland, first on beam and third on vault.Level 2 OpenJulie Poetsch took third on floor and bars, fourth overall; Kelly Westrop, second on vault, fourth on floor, fifth overall; and Rebecca Benner, sixth on vault, beam, floor and overall.Level 3 Tyro/Novice combinedJasmine Schacher captured first on beam, second on floor, bars and overall and Ella Kellan, third on floor and fourth overall.Highschool Level 1 Category Trilby Buck, first on vault, floor and first overall.Highschool Level 2 CategoryDanielle Cousins was first on beam, floor and overall; Shaylene Geist, second on bars, beam, third overall; Leanne Kalmikoff, third on floor, bars and overall and Abby Cowan second on floor, third on valult and fourth overall.Boys Level 3 Under 13Quinn Barron dominated with a gold in all six events and overall; Ciun Murphy, second on floor, rings and parallel bars second overall and Oliver McDougall-Eisele, second on vault and horizontal bar and third overall.sports@thenelsondaily.comlast_img read more

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Hawks oust Thunder Cats to advance to KIJHL Final against Storm

first_imgRebounding from an opening game loss, the Beaver Valley Nitehawks won four straight to capture the Kootenay Conference Championship Monday in Creston with a 6-2 win over the Thunder Cats.The Hawks win the best-of-seven Conference Series 4-1 and now advance to the Kootenay International Junior Hockey League Championship beginning Friday against the Kamloops Storm.Kamloops, the KIJHL regular season champs, swept 100 Mile House Wranglers 4-0 in the Okanagan/Shuswap Conference series.The first two games of the series are in Kamloops before the series shifts to Beaver Valley for Games three and four, March 31 and April 1. If necessary the remaining games are set for April 3 (Kamloops), April 4 (Fruitvale) and April 6 (Kamloops).Braden Fuller scored once and added two assists to power the Nitehawks past the Eddie Mountain Champs from Creston.The Thunder Cats won the opener of the series 5-4.But the Hawks stole Game two 6-3 before sweeping the rest of the series by a combined score of 17-7.The KIJHL champion advances to the Cyclone Taylor Cup, set for April 10-13 in Nelson.In other KIJHL news:The Grand Forks Border Bruins are proud to announce that forward Jackson Purvis has committed to play hockey for the Bethel University Royals during the 2014/15 season. Bethel is a NCAA Division III program located in St Paul, Minnesota. Purvis captained the Border Bruins this past season, and is a two time Team MVP and 2012/13 Neil Murdoch Division Most Sportsmanlike Player. Purvis tallied 50 goals and 61 assists for 111 points in 82 games.last_img read more

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Saints added some grit to lineup of two-time defending BCIHL champs

first_imgThe Selkirk Saints added some grit to the lineup for the 2014/15 B.C. Intercollegiate Hockey League season.The Saints announced a playing commitment from forward Tyler Kerner of Taber, Alta., to attend Selkirk College.”Tyler is a hard-working, physical winger who plays the game with lots of energy and competes hard,” head coach Jeff Dubois of the two-time defending BCIHL Champion Saints said. “He really fits the profile of the type of player we were looking to add to what is shaping up as a very skilled group. We see Tyler being a guy who sets a physical tone for us and who makes himself and his line difficult to play against, particularly versus top players on other teams.”Kerner is a 5-foot-11, 205 pound winger who spent the last three seasons in the Alberta Junior Hockey League playing with the Lloydminster Bobcats, Drumheller Dragons and Olds Grizzlys.He split the 2013/14 campaign between Drumheller and Olds, where he scored once while adding nine assists and 85 penalty minutes in 36 regular season and playoff games.Over the course of his Junior A career, Kerner scored nine goals and totaled 32 points and 255 penalty minutes in 112 AJHL games. “I’m very excited to start my post-secondary career with the Saints and join a winning organization,” said Kerner, who describes himself as playing a physical, simple, role game while taking pride in taking care of his own zone first.”I think of myself as a leader who is willing to do whatever it takes to win. I work very well beneath the crease protecting the puck while trying to find players to set up in the offensive zone.” Kerner plans to enter Selkirk’s Business Administration program.”I’m looking forward to moving to the community of Castlegar, as it reminds me of the town I was raised in,” Kerner explains.”The small classes are also a huge benefit, knowing that there will be more attention to help me get the most out of my schooling. My academic goal this year will be to achieve a GPA of 3.5 or higher. On the ice, I want to develop my game while helping my team capture a third straight BCIHL championship.” Kerner is the Saints’ ninth commitment for the 2014/15 season, joining forwards Ryan Edwards (Beaver Valley, KIJHL), Jamie Vlanich (Nelson Leafs, KIJHL), Alex Milligan (Peninsula Panthers, VIJHL), Matt Martin (Ontario Avalanche, WSHL) and Connor Beauchemin (Castlegar Rebels, KIJHL), as well as defencemen Curtis Toneff (Campbell River Storm, VIJHL) and Danny Vlanich (Surrey Eagles, BCHL), and goaltender Steven Glass (Nipawin Hawks, SJHL).last_img read more

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Greenwood hosts second successful rugby bash

first_imgGreenwood was full of Rugby players again last weekend for the Boundary Bash Social 10s Rugby Tournament. This is the second year they have hosted this tournament and this year they were larger by just one team.Organizer and Jewel Lake resident Oliver Glaser said the tournament was a success, particularly in regards to the social aspect.Everyone had fun and the City of Greenwood opened up O’Hairi Park as a campsite for the rugby players, he said.This year’s teams included the East Vancouver Scribes, who technically hosted the event because Glaser still plays on their team, the Trail Colonials, the Grand Forks Wanderers, the Ridge Meadow Bruins (Maple Ridge) and the Nelson Grizzlies.The Grizzlies easily won the tournament because they won all their games and had the most ‘tries’ – goal attempts. There was only one woman’s team, which came from Ridge Meadows. The men’s teams played a few games with them and some of the woman joined the men’s teams and played along with them.“One woman player on the Grizzlies,” said Glaser, noting that she played exceptionally well. “She was fit and toned and ran hard. She ran really good lines.”The Trail Colonials were awarded the most social team and Bryan Louzon was awarded the most social player.Glaser said the games were all really good and that the level of play was strong this year. The players followed the rules and there was no kicking or fighting.Ingram Creek Saddlery donated a custom-made leather ball for the winning team again this year. Glaser said this makes them stand out from other tournaments.“It’s a really special thing,” he said.  New to the tournament this year was a kids touch game and a concession stand. They had about 100 people as spectators and everyone seemed to have a good time, said Glaser.The only real complaint was about the noise from the music at the campsite at night. Glaser said he hadn’t considered how much the noise would carry and that he would consider a noise curfew the next year.Glaser is hoping to host the event this year but says it depends on what the numbers look like after they have done their calculations. He is happy if they are just able to break even because it’s all about having fun, but if the host team has lost a lot of money they may not host it again next year.last_img read more

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Mallard’s Team of the Week —Nelson Youth Soccer U14 Selects

first_imgA late goal may have denied the Nelson U14 Selects the gold medal at the recent Pend Oreille Cup soccer tournament in Sandpoint, Idaho, but it did not stop staff at Mallard’s Source for sports to honour the squad with Team of the Week status.The Selects finished second in Sandpoint after surrendering a late goal to the Spokane Breakers to grab the silver medal. Nelson defeated Coeur d’Alene Sting 3-0 and registered a 1-0 win against the Breakers before surviving a shootout to advance to the final.The U14 Nelson Selects team includes coach Lyle Hill, Blake Markin-Hellekson, Josh Yasek, Luka Eyre, Cody St. Thomas, Keanu Tromans, Ezra Foy, Milo Baranyai Sheppard, coach Kerry Dyck, Thomas Baxter, Jahmal Truth-Verville, Josh Schacher, Ernesto Archambault, Jaden Dyck, Jesse Thurston, Grayson Hill, Aidan Mushumanski, Angus Paterson, Jacob Erickson and keeper Bradey Sookero.last_img read more

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