A look inside: Lowell House

first_img“We are about to light the Yule Log,” intoned House Master Diana Eck to the gathering of more than 400 Lowellians at the annual Yule Dinner.“This is the time of year rich with sacred and secular observances. But these rites we observe tonight take us back to the ancient pagan soil beneath so many traditions: bringing greens into homes at midwinter, kindling lights and fires at the darkest time of year, and feasting at table with loved ones,” said Eck, who is also Fredric Wertham Professor of Law and Psychiatry in Society and a member of the Divinity School faculty. “So deeply did New England’s Puritans resist the celebrations of this season that Increase Mather and his kin prohibited it and levied a 5 shilling fine against anyone found celebrating in this manner.”The diners were served by white-coated staff members who carved up roasts, replenished platters, and catered to special requests. Then, House masters at the high table summoned those same servers to the stage. One by one, they came forward, were praised for their steadfast contributions to the quality of House life, and were given gifts and hugs. Several were moved to tears, as they basked in the applause of the entire dining hall, and then returned the gesture, with givers and receivers applauding each other, in the true spirit of the holiday season. Sing, sing! Ryan Solis ’12 (from left), Zavier Catoe ’12, and Harvard Divinity School Professor Leila Ahmed join other revelers in singing carols before the annual Yule Dinner. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer Seasonal delights Stephen Murphy ’13 (left) and Preston Han ’13 help themselves to cookies and Bûche de Noël after the Yule Dinner at Lowell House. Mulling things over Lowell House members gather by the tree for hot cider and cookies before the annual Yule Dinner in the dining hall. Yuletide rhapsody House Masters Dorothy Austin (left) and Diana Eck extend a joyous welcome to the gathered throng. Logging traditioncenter_img What a log The Yule log burns in the dining room fireplace. Keep on loggin’ Lawrence Cripe ’13 and Briana Jackucewicz ’13 carry the Yule log into the dining room. Some like it hot Christine Hurd ’13 stands by the Yule log in the fireplace. “I’m from Texas,” Hurd says, “and I like it hot!” Giving spirit Mark Farrell is congratulated by House Masters Diana Eck and Dorothy Austin after he and other kitchen staff received gifts and acknowledgement for their contributions to Lowell House. Well-deserved Kitchen staff Liliana Lopes (left) smiles through her tears as she and Filomena Costa react to applause after receiving gifts and acknowledgement for their contributions to the quality of life at Lowell House.last_img read more

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Club Passim plays to its Harvard audience

first_imgMarblehead native Hayley Reardon was just 11 years old when she picked up the guitar. A year later, she had written her own songs and wanted to perform onstage. Wary of having her play in a bar, her uncle suggested that she check out Club Passim, just steps away from Harvard’s campus.“As soon as I walked in, I realized that there was a whole, rich community that I hoped to become be part of, and a place where I could someday perform,” said Reardon, who has since opened for Don White and who released her first album, Where the Artists Go, in 2012. “They welcomed me and took me in.”Passim, she said, “is where I found my voice, and it was a lot bigger than I expected it to be as a 13-year-old kid. The people there really listened; they heard that voice.”Over the years, Passim and its Harvard audiences have heard many voices, some of them the biggest stars of folk and blues. Bonnie Raitt chose to attend Radcliffe College partly because of its proximity to Club 47, as Passim was known in the 1960s; Tom Rush began performing in 1961 while studying English at Harvard; and Joan Baez famously played the club when she was just 17 — and there introduced a young Bob Dylan, who performed between acts.Dan Hogan, director of Club Passim, called Reardon, who is now 16, “a young Joan Baez,” and said her experience reflects the club’s focus not just on exceptional musical experiences, but also on nurturing artists and building community.“Passim is really a listening room,” Hogan said. “It’s not like a bar, where music is in the background. Our patrons are well informed about music, and the performers know that. Cambridge, particularly right now, is a great music community, and our music now is much broader than folk music or singer-songwriter. It’s whatever music sounds good in a small listening room: bands, jazz, bluegrass, and solo musicians of all kinds.”Jack Megan, director of the Office for the Arts at Harvard and a former board member of Club Passim, has been listening since his undergraduate days at the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester.“My initial affiliation was as a fan,” Megan said. “There’s a real intimacy between the club’s space and the stage, between the audience and the performer. It allows for being both in and around the music, which creates a powerful intimacy — a real feeling of belonging and oneness, for both the performer and the audience.”Kate Cameron was one of the Berklee students who provided music for the Thursday Passim-Berklee outdoor summer concert series on Palmer Street.While the club’s 55-year history is legendary, its new School of Music and close proximity to Harvard have created a strong bond among local musicians, faculty, staff, and students.Forrest O’Connor ’10, who plays the mandolin and served on Passim’s board while a Harvard undergraduate, approached the club about webcasting its shows. O’Connor is the co-founder of Concert Window, a company that webcasts concerts to viewers around the world. Passim was the first venue partner to sign up.“Passim has a legacy of finding and presenting really high-quality music every day,” O’Connor said. “They’re very open-minded and forward-thinking. The club has great connections with Harvard and Berklee College of Music, so it’s a cross-city relationship that’s a great resource for a lot of artists in the area.”Matt Glaser, a violinist and the artistic director of the American Roots Music Program at Berklee, has played at Passim since the late ’70s. Building a connection between Berklee and Passim, he said, was a natural fit. On the fourth Tuesday of every month, Berklee students travel to Harvard Square to perform at the club. In addition, Berklee students and alumni provided music each Thursday this summer for the Passim-Berklee outdoor summer concert series on Palmer Street.“They’re a wonderful group of people to work with, and they really know what they’re doing,” O’Connor said of Passim. “It’s definitely something that Harvard students should experience while they’re here. There’s just nothing else like it.”Harvard students should experience while they’re here. There’s just nothing else like it.”–>last_img read more

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Hanging a welcome sign for art

first_img Introduced by President Drew Faust and moderated by Thomas W. Lentz, director of the Harvard Art Museums, the panel included Paul Ha of MIT, Glenn Lowry of MoMA, and Jennifer Roberts of Harvard University. <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kc0f-fdZXQM” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/Kc0f-fdZXQM/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a> In the 1970s, the Italian architect Renzo Piano was a young upstart with immense talent and brazen daring. It was then, still fairly early in his career, that Piano and his partner, the architect Richard Rogers, redefined the architectural landscape with their groundbreaking Pompidou Center in Paris.The home of the largest modern art museum in Europe, the building’s exposed ventilation ducts, brightly colored pipes, and covered escalators crisscrossing its façade angered much of the public long before it opened its doors in 1977. During its construction, a group of French intellectuals wrote a letter condemning the building they feared would disgrace Paris.But rants soon turned to raves, and the Pompidou was hailed as a masterpiece.The work marked a fundamental shift for the future of architecture. Now, many observers expect that Piano’s newly renovated and expanded Harvard Art Museums will help mark another fundamental shift, this time in the way people engage and connect with great works of art. The museums open to the public on Nov. 16.Piano’s Harvard arts project is being heralded as much for the exterior and its stunning glass roof as for its innovative new interior layout, programmed by museum officials to encourage visitors to slow down, look closely, and connect with art in new ways.With the imminent reopening of the Harvard Art Museums after six years, the question of how to engage visitors, both from the academic community and the public, into greater conversation and connection with today’s university museums was the subject of a panel discussion Thursday at the Northwest Science Building, a session introduced by Harvard President Drew Faust.“Today we hope to generate a conversation about what that means for this University, this city, and the world, and about what the museum might mean for all of us,” said Faust, who had convened an arts task force in 2008 to explore ways to integrate those areas more fully into campus life. “This is not just the old museum opening up again. This is something quite new. … Renzo’s breathtaking spaces, the Calderwood Courtyard turned into a public square, the marvelous classrooms and auditorium, and the museum as teaching machine. How do we integrate that into our curriculum and into our lives?”President Drew Faust: “This is not just the old museum opening up again. This is something quite new. … Renzo’s breathtaking spaces, the Calderwood Courtyard turned into a public square, the marvelous classrooms and auditorium, and the museum as teaching machine. How do we integrate that into our curriculum and into our lives?” Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerIntegrating the museums into the curriculum was a concept familiar to panelist Jennifer Roberts, Harvard’s Elizabeth Cary Agassiz Professor of the Humanities. In 2010, Roberts taught a course that resulted in a full-fledged exhibition, co-curated by her Harvard students at the Arthur M. Sackler Museum. The experience helped the undergraduates to think in a differently, she recalled, and challenged them to make spatial instead of linear arguments.“New perspectives,” she said, “are opened up in the space.” Roberts leads one of Harvard’s new humanities framework courses, “The Art of Looking,” which draws heavily on the Art Museums’ collections. One of her goals is to use the class to reach out to students studying the sciences to show them why “a critical and historical understanding of images and art objects” has relevance to their future careers.Scientists, she said, control “chaotic data by placing it into the visual format.”“Being able to be critical and intelligent and creative with images is something that’s very central to what scientists need to be able to do,” said Roberts, adding that medical schools often use a close investigation of items in a museum’s collections to help their medical students and staff improve their diagnoses and their ability to empathize with patients.“The museum needs to be a place where we have a meeting between the usual and the unusual subjects,” Roberts said, a place where scientists, historians, doctors, art historians, and archaeologists can have important, two-way conversations that build “new rigorous knowledge about these collections across the University.”The panelists agreed that one important way to engage the public is to let people see the works up close. At the List Visual Art Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, students can hang a work on their wall for a year as part of a student loan art program, explained its director, panelist Paul Ha. At Harvard, students and visitors will be able to spend quality time with great works in the expanded Art Study Center, an area on the museums’ fourth floor where visitors can request an object from any of the three museums for personal inspection.“This is an institution that has always placed a value on close, sustained observation and the thinking that goes along with it,” said moderator and Art Museums’ director Thomas W. Lentz. “We actually think these will be great engines for collaboration, for working across different fields and disciplines.”The director of the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York, Glenn D. Lowry, encouraged the crowd to think about university museums and museums in general as incubators of lively debate and discussion. Lowry, who invited several nearby universities to use MoMA as their unofficial teaching lab two years ago, urged administrators to consider turning their museums over to students. To accomplish that, he said, the old museum paradigm of hushed tones and quiet reflection has to go.Museums that create “an environment that encourages students to talk to each other, galleries that are alive with conversations that encourage and invite a different kind of student discourse,” can create a much more dynamic social experience, said Lowry. And when students are there, he added, “the more faculty are going to think of [museums] as a place to intersect.”A museum’s physical dimensions also play an important role in how the public experiences and engages with the art inside, the panelists agreed. The scale and proportions of the space and even the air quality inside are important, as are the building materials used, and the lighting.Fresh from a tour of the newly completed Harvard Art Museums, Lowry praised Lentz for preserving the “scale of a museum that made it a place that was physically comfortable, but you’ve crated a luminosity that I think will be paralleled by an openness of thinking and ideas that those spaces will encourage.”Of course, in today’s hyper-connected world, where “my son texts me from the dinner table,” Ha joked, learning how the digital domain can help viewers connect to art is critical.“Digital surrogates,” or photographs of art objects available online, are never a replacement for the real thing, but they can be an important way to draw people in to connect with the actual works in the museum, agreed Ha and Roberts.“Technology is a great communicating tool, it’s a great tool for driving content, but in the end it’s not the same. … In the end our job is to present a real object to a real person,” said Ha.Lowry said that digital technology can “help stimulate and reinforce the kinds of conversations that we hope will occur in the museum and to turn the institution into an essentially 24/7 environment.”Anyone with a Facebook page or an Instagram account knows those conversations are often happening online or with the help of a smartphone, and in the selfie-crazed era there’s usually a photo involved. One way to generate those discussions in the museum, said Lowry, is to encourage people to take photos of the art and share them with each other.“If you try to discourage it,” he said, “it’s mission impossible.”Instead Lowry chose to use it as an opportunity for visitors to share images with their friends in and outside the museum, “so they can begin a conversation.”“Every one of these opportunities is a way of connecting someone to someone else through the museum about art.”Art Museums and the University: The New Paradigmlast_img read more

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Notre Dame alumnus pledges $100 million unrestricted gift to the University

first_imgThe University will receive an unrestricted gift of $100 million from an alumnus after his death, according to a Tuesday CNBC report.The report said 1978 Notre Dame graduate Kenneth Ricci has promised the donation to the University in order to “set aside some money for his family and their foundation while also resolving the transfer of ownership in his business after his death” if his three kids do not want to take over any of the businesses.A member of the Air Force ROTC and Band of the Fighting Irish during his time at Notre Dame and a current member of the Board of Trustees, Ricci said “the one thing [Notre Dame doesn’t] have is money they can do what they want with,” according to the report.Ricci’s pledge comes one year after he and his wife donated $5 million to the University for Ricci Family Fields, the turf fields next to Stepan Center for the University marching band and RecSports to use.According to the report, Ricci’s pledge is particularly unusual not just because of the amount of money he has promised to donate, but also due to the unrestricted aspect of the gift. The report said there were only two $100 million gifts to universities in 2016, and the number of unrestricted gifts “makes up less than 10 percent of gifts” to universities.“There aren’t many people who give this much unrestricted,” Greg Dugard, senior director of the Office of Gift Planning, said in the report. “I’m not aware of it anywhere in higher ed.”According to the report, the University will receive the gift as a $100 million stake in Ricci’s private business, Directional Aviation Capital. After Ricci’s death, Notre Dame “will be responsible for selling the business assets and returning any proceeds above $100 million to the family.” The report also said the amount of the pledge may increase “depending on growth in the value of the businesses” between now and then.Tags: donation, Kenn Ricci, unrestricted giftlast_img read more

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Celoron Domestic Incident Leads To Gun Charge

first_imgCELORON — Town of Ellicott Police have charged a local man with multiple charges, including criminal possession of a weapon, after he allegedly threatened his victim during a reported domestic incident last week.Officers responded to a Celoron address on Friday where their investigation revealed Randall J. Fernandez , no address listed, threatened the victim’s life in front of two children, Police said.Fernandez was allegedly in possession of a handgun without a permit.He was charged with second-degree harassment, endangering the welfare of a child and fourth-degree criminal possession of a weapon. Fernandez was transported to the Chautauqua County Jail for arraignment and is due to be in the Town of Ellicott Court at a later date. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Bolton Valley opened Saturday

first_imgOnce again, snowmakers defied Mother Nature’s thoughts of a warm winter and made enough snow this week so that skiers and riders could celebrate opening day Saturday at Bolton Valley, just 30 minutes from Burlington and 10 minutes from Interstate 89.Bolton Valley opened at 10 am with two trails and two lifts. Photos are available here.To kick off the 2011-2012 season, Bolton Valley officials created a festive package of activities to complement skiing and riding on opening day. In addition to the inaugural turns on opening day, skiers and riders filled their tummies with yummy samples of some of Vermont’s finest food purveyors. Olivia’s Croutons and Two Guys in VT Soups, Vermont Natural Foods, Vermont Cookie Love, and Red Maple Granola were just a few of the companies offering samples of their wares from 11 a.m. ‘ 3 p.m. to guests at Bolton.Santa was closing act for the day at Bolton as Mr. and Mrs. Claus arrived around 4 p.m. and lead a tree lighting ceremony at the ski area.Early season lift ticket prices are $29 for adults and $24 for youth/college/seniors. The ski area is open tomorrow, Sunday, Dec. 11 and will then close for skiing and riding from Monday ‘ Thursday. The ski area plans to re-open on Friday, Dec. 16 with skiing and riding from the top of the Vista Quad, weather and snow conditions permitting. Snowmakers will continue to make more snow as weather permits. For the latest snow conditions, visit www.boltonvalley.com(link is external).Bolton Valley is Vermont’s most convenient and affordable big mountain skiing. Less than 10 minutes from I-89 and less than 30 minutes from Burlington, the family-friendly mountain offers skiers and riders of all abilities three mountain peaks with 70 trails and 6 lifts, plus 3 terrain parks including the Burton Progression Park.Bolton Valley was the first in Vermont and the second in the US to implement wind power as an energy source and is the recipient of the National Ski Areas Association’s 2010 Silver Eagle Award for environmental initiatives. Approximately 88km of high elevation Nordic terrain, a complete Sports Center and Indoor Amusement Center plus Vermont’s most extensive top-to-bottom night skiing and riding are just a few of the extras available to guests. For more information visit www.boltonvalley.com(link is external) or call 877-9BOLTON. BOLTON VALLEY, Vt. (Dec. 10, 2011) ‘last_img read more

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How to Do Everything Wrong

first_imgPardon my bragging, but I have a small group of friends who are quite accomplished adventurers. We’ve done things. Biked all the way across the Pisgah Ranger District. We’ve snow-camped at 5,500 feet in the middle of a blizzard. We’ve ridden our bikes 150 miles from one brewery to the next. We’ve run through the night, as a team, with a DJ accompanying us while carrying a boom box on his shoulder. We’ve raced serious time trials in cut off jean shorts. We’re worldly. Follow our advice for planning your next epic adventure, be it a formal race or three solitary nights in the woods, and you too will come out the other end far more worldly.1. Don’t bother training. Got a race with a distance you’ve never even driven before? Wing it. It’s best to go in with fresh legs. I don’t care what your Cat 2 racing neighbor says, you can ride 100 miles in the summer heat without logging any tempo workouts. Look, anybody can race in their peak performance shape, but only a few of us have the courage to tackle the challenge with a pudgy belly.2. Leave the map in the glove box. I like maps when they’re hanging on a wall and marking the spot for pirate treasure, but they have no place in the backcountry. Ditto for compasses. And don’t get me started on GPS. If Columbus had a GPS, he never would have discovered America. Think about that.3. Fact: hydration is important. Fact: beer hydrates. That’s not just mumbo jumbo, there’s real science to back that up. Not only does beer hydrate your body, it hydrates your mind. I’ve gotten some of my best adventure ideas while hydrating at a local hydrating establishment. I find it’s best to keep hydrating throughout the epic adventure.4. Agendas are meant to be broken. Having a plan of attack is all well and good, but sticking to a strict “schedule” feels a bit like school, doesn’t it?  Try this the next time you’re planning a multi-day backpacking trip: Write down what time you need to be at the trailhead, how long you plan to hike each day, and where you’ll camp each night. Then burn that plan, eat an enormous breakfast at the Waffle House, take a nap, and show up to the trailhead six hours late so you’re forced to hike for three hours in the dark just to reach the next flat campsite. That’s the way real adventurers do it. 1 2last_img read more

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Colombian Police Seize Over 1.5 Tons of Marihuana

first_img The Colombian Police seized 1,600 kilos of marihuana, which were transported through a road that joins southern Colombia with Bogotá, hidden in a shipment of fish, the Police reported on March 25. Colonel Flavio Mesa, police commander at the Cundinamarca department, said the marihuana was valued at $5.5 million and transported in a compressed form. According to the colonel, the drug had been hidden among the dry fish –in high demand in Colombia during Holy Week–, since the smell would avoid its detection. When Mesa exhibited the seized marihuana to the press, he said that 400 kilos of “cripi”, a variety of higher quality product valued three times higher than regular marihuana, were also found. The truck driver transporting the smuggled cargo was arrested. The vehicle was intercepted by the Police on a road that leads south of the Colombian capital city, on a point between Melgar and Bogotá. By Dialogo March 27, 2013last_img read more

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Letters To The Press, September, 2013

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York [colored_box=”blue”]Your LIBOR story reports that former Barclays president Bob Diamond initially responded to the scandal by admitting that while manipulation occurred, it didn’t happen “on the majority of days.” The Economist said Diamond’s response was ‘rather like an adulterer saying that he was faithful on most days.’”  That’s almost as nervy as the parent-killer requesting mercy on the grounds that he’s now an orphan to be pitied.– Richard Siegelman, Plainview via email[/colored_box]I always liked “coyote in the chicken coup,” but yea, its about the jist. In response to “New Fox, Same Henhouse: Wall Street Takes Over LIBOR.”– @wizardofcause via Twitter[colored_box=”blue”]As a New Yorker, I expect our legislators to do everything in their power to protect us from another Superstorm Sandy, but the NY senate, especially Senators Dean Skelos and Jeffrey Klein, failed to reach an agreement to expand clean and renewable solar power in NY. I can’t image how this common sense issue failed to pass. Just a few months ago, Gov. Andrew Cuomo laid out a simple plan to grow solar power that, if passed by the Legislature, would have kept 120,000 tons of greenhouse gas emissions out of our atmosphere and powered electricity in 400,000 NY homes. Many areas of NY, including Skelos’ district in Long Island, were devastated by Sandy. Why couldn’t Skelos at least agree to pass the governor’s plan for solar? It’s time for our legislators to stop playing politics, and start solving global warming.– Natalie Galarza, Intern with Environment New York via email[/colored_box]Bradley Manning is a hero. We should be thanking him and giving him a Nobel Peace Prize. He should have more than a life with no sentence at all. Another prime example of how we punish the whistleblowers who did what they did for love of their country.– Susan Reardon Clennan via Facebook[colored_box=”blue”]#Manning won’t get 136 years. Woo-hoo! Yes We Can! Say, @barackobama, when does #DOJ indict the war criminals he exposed? In response to “Manning Trial: Max Sentence Reduced”– @Mike93434986 via Twitter[/colored_box]If they closed the beaches everytime someone saw a shark, they’d never be open! I should just sit out there off-shore in my boat and keep phoning in sightings one after another. What idiots! Any day I can sit out there and pull in sharks of all kinds.– Thomas Price Angelus Fitch via Facebook[colored_box=”blue”]Do they still print #Newsday? If so, does anyone read it? In response to “Newsday Omission in Story on Owner’s Rival Raises Questions.”– @CJ_Marchello via Twitter[/colored_box]Just saying..it’s not you, Press.. news comes in so fast. If you don’t jump on it and miss the story, you’re screwed. If you do jump on a story and there is more than it seems, you’re screwed. At the end of the day, The Press is the best. All I want is the truth. Just give me some truth…– Joann Filoseta-Vernell via Facebooklast_img read more

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Man Threw 2 on Hot Coals at Inwood BBQ, Cops Say

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A Queens man has been accused of throwing a 56-year-old woman on hot coals from a grill that he knocked over before allegedly stabbing her with a BBQ barbeque utensil in Inwood.Nassau County police arrested Frederick Walker on charges of assault and criminal possession of a weapon.Police said the 43-year-old Far Rockaway man also struck the woman’s head against the sidewalk during the attack outside of a Bayview Avenue residence at 9:41 p.m. Saturday.When a 59-year-old man tried to pull Walker off of the victim, the suspect allegedly threw the second victim onto the hot coals, police added.Both victims were taken to a local hospital, where they were treated for lacerations and burn injuries to their arms, hands and legs.Walker also allegedly kicked an officer in the hand while being taken into custody, police said.Bail for Walker was set at $20,000 cash or $40,000 bond. He is due back in court Monday.last_img read more

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