Michael Rupert & More Complete the Cast for On The Town

first_imgTony winner Michael Rupert (Legally Blonde: The Musical, Ragtime, Falsettos, Sweet Charity) and Allison Guinn (Hair) will join Tony Yazbeck, Jay Armstrong Johnson and Clyde Alves in the new Broadway revival of On the Town. Directed by John Rando, previews will start at the Lyric Theatre (formerly the Foxwoods) on September 20, with opening night set for October 16. Related Shows View Comments Rupert will play Judge Pitkin and Guinn will play Lucy Schmeeler. Phillip Boykin (The Gershwins’ Porgy and Bess) and Stephen DeRosa (Hairspray, The Nance, Into The Woods) also join the cast. The ensemble will feature Chip Abbott, Tanya Birl, Angela Brydon, Holly Ann Butler, Julius Carter, Kristine Covillo, Lori Ann Ferreri, Paloma Garcia-Lee, Stephen Hanna, Eloise Kropp, Brandon Leffler, Jess Leprotto, Cory Lingner, Skye Mattox, Michael Rosen, Samantha Sturm, Christopher Vo, Cody Williams and Mikey Winslow. Show Closed This production ended its run on Sept. 6, 2015center_img On the Town The cast will also include the previously reported Megan Fairchild, Alysha Umphress, Elizabeth Stanley and Jackie Hoffman. First seen on Broadway in 1944, On the Town follows the adventures of three sailors on leave in New York City. Based on the ballet Fancy Free by Jerome Robbins, the musical features music by Leonard Bernstein and book and lyrics by Betty Comden and Adolph Green. Toe-tapping hits from the show include “New York, New York,” “I Can Cook Too,” “Lonely Town” and “Some Other Time.” Yazbeck, Johnson and Alves will be reprising their roles from the 2013 Barrington Stage Company production of the tuner.last_img read more

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Brazil’s Rousseff, Mulling Jet Deal, Touts Defense

first_img Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff, who is deliberating a multi-billion dollar jet fighter deal, defended the need to spend money on defense at a time when she is making big budget cuts in other areas. Rousseff’s comments at a military ceremony in Brasilia are one of the clearest signs to date that she could move forward soon on a deal to buy at least 36 fighter jets from either U.S.-based Boeing, France’s Dassault Aviation or Sweden’s Saab. “A totally developed Brazil will need equipped, trained, modern Armed Forces,” Rousseff said. “Defense cannot be considered a lesser element on the national agenda.” Some critics have suggested that Rousseff should postpone the purchase of the warplanes until 2012 or later given that she just announced $30 billion in cuts in other areas to cool Brazil’s booming economy. Yet Rousseff told the audience it would be a “big mistake” to consider spending on upgrading military technology to be an “idle effort.” Rousseff said that Brazil needs a strong military to defend its new offshore oil reserves, as well as guarantee the security of the vast Amazon region. The aircraft deal has become one of the most hotly disputed trade and diplomatic issues under Rousseff’s administration, which took office on 1 January. She has cast the deal as a way to modernize Brazil’s Air Force as well as consolidate strategic partnerships over the coming decades. Rousseff’s recent actions and declarations have indicated she is leaning toward purchasing Boeing’s F-18, and U.S. President Barack Obama pushed the deal on a visit to Brasilia last month. However, Dassault and Saab have also expressed confidence that their bids are stronger, especially on transfers of proprietary technology that Rousseff has said are crucial to her decision. To defuse criticism of her budget priorities, Rousseff could announce the winner of the tender in coming months but defer any expenditures until 2012, or seek financing that would lessen the short-term blow of the purchase to government accounts. By Dialogo April 08, 2011last_img read more

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US Hands Over Donation to Guatemala to Fight COVID-19

first_imgBy Guatemalan Ministry of Public Health and Social Assistance/Edited by Diálogo Staff October 30, 2020 Guatemala’s Ministry of Public Health and Social Assistance and the Migration Institute received a donation from the U.S. government of 12 military field medical tents with a 16-people capacity, 142 folding cots, and two 30-kilowatt diesel generators.The donation totals $243,402.48, and was carried out by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the U.S. Department of Defense through U.S. Southern Command. These tents will help national hospitals and centers for returnees to create safe areas for COVID-19 testing, detection, treatment, and quarantine.The handover took place at the National Coordinator for Disaster Reduction (CONRED, in Spanish) facilities, with the participation of U.S. Ambassador to Guatemala Luis Arreaga, who stressed that “during a global health crisis, the United States collaborates with its friends, as we have done with Guatemala from the beginning of this worlwide crisis.” He added that the government he represents is working on delivering additional assistance in the coming weeks.Guatemalan Health Minister Amelia Flores, Foreign Minister Pedro Brolo, and CONRED Executive Secretary Oscar Cossío took part in the handover ceremony.The Guatemalan government thanks the United States for this donation.last_img read more

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Gov. Bush makes more JNC appointments

first_img Gov. Bush makes more JNC appointments September 1, 2001 Regular News Gov. Jeb Bush has named members to all but two of the state’s judicial nominating commissions under a new state law that gives him great control over the panels that screen applicants for judgeships. Under the new law, the governor must fill six vacancies on each of the state’s 26 JNCs. Five of those people, two of whom must be lawyers, are directly appointed by Bush, while the sixth must be from a list of three applicants forwarded by The Florida Bar. The governor, however, can reject a Bar list as many times as he wants, although he has not done so under the new law. In late July, Bush named members to the Second District Court of Appeal and 11 th, 13 th, and 15 th c ircuit JNCs (see the August 1 Bar News ), each of which had several vacancies pending. Early last month, his office announced the members of 20 more commissions. Still to be chosen at Bar News press time were members of the Supreme Court and 16 th C ircuit JNCs. The governor’s office also set up an August 14 training program for the new JNC members (see story, page 1). The following is a list of people appointed by Bush to the 20 JNCs. In each case, the first person appointed is from the list submitted by the Bar and the remainder are direct gubernatorial appointees: • First District Court of Appeal JNC – Robert P. Gaines of Pensacola, Edward P. Fleming of Pensacola, Jeanne M. Miller of Jacksonville, Maggie A. Moody of Tallahassee, Kevin Neal of Tallahassee, and Barbara H. Wright of Tallahassee. • Third District Court of Appeal JNC – Gerald B. Wald of Miami, Hector J. Lombana of Coral Gables, Norma S. Lindsey of Miami Beach, Matias R. Dorta of Miami, Mariaelena Villamil of Coral Gables, and Thomas R. Spencer of Miami. • Fourth District Court of Appeal JNC – Charles B. Morton, Jr., of Lauderhill, Thomas E. Sliney of Boca Raton, Paul O. Lopez of Ft. Lauderdale, Fernando L. Roig of Boca Raton, Richard L. Handley of Ft. Lauderdale, and Vernon D. Smith of Ft. Pierce. • Fifth District Court of Appeal JNC – Morgan L. Reinman of Merritt Island, C. Richard Newsome of Orlando, James A. “Skip” Fowler of Orlando, Edward L. Jasper of Port Orange, Jerry Buchanan of Orlando, and Lewis C. Webb of Rockledge. • First Circuit JNC – Linda H. Wade of Pensacola, Jackie L. Bytell of DeFuniak Springs, Eric J. Nickelsen of Pensacola, Stanley K. Luke of Crestview, Frederick J. McFaul of Milton, and Patricia H. Tolbert of Ft. Walton Beach. • Second Circuit JNC – Elaine N. Duggar of Tallahassee, Lynette G. Brown of Tallahassee, Jessica E. Varn of Tallahassee, Jason B. Gonzalez of Tallahassee, William W. Mahaffey of Quincy, and Kim E. McDowell of Tallahassee. • Third Circuit JNC – David A. Phelps of Perry, Almyra J. “Princess” Akerman of Madison, William W. Blue of Perry, William T. Nelson of Wellborn, Guy W. Norris, of Lake City, and Elizabeth W. Porter of Lake City. • Fourth Circuit JNC – Mary Bland Love of Jacksonville, Michael H. Stokes of Maxville, Cleve E. Warren of Jacksonville, Peter D. Sleiman of Jacksonville, Angela B. Corey of Jacksonville and Terrence James of Jacksonville. • Fifth Circuit JNC – Eric H. Faddis of Leesburg, Anne W. Corcoran of Crystal River, Michael A. Graves of Leesburg, Lisa Herndon of Williston, Thomas S. Hogan of Brooksville, and H. Randolph Klein of Ocala. • Sixth Circuit JNC – Sally D. Skipper of New Port Richey, Susan P. Bedinghaus of St. Petersburg, Nicole A. Kerr of New Port Richey, George M. Jirotka of Belleair Shore, Gary N. Strohauer of Seminole, and Darryl C. Wilson of St. Petersburg. • Seventh Circuit JNC – Rebecca R. Wall of Daytona Beach, Catheryn S. Martin of Daytona Beach, James D. Clark of Ponte Vedra Beach, Michael E. Glenn of Palatka, Maureen S. Christine of St. Augustine, and Sean Daley of Daytona Beach. • Eighth Circuit JNC – Zelda J. Hawk of Gainesville, Allen W. Clark of Raiford, Marjorie P. Hazouri of Gainesville, Rose Mary T. Oelrich of Gainesville, Caridad S. Gonzalez of Gainesville, and Robert L. Woody of Gainesville. • Ninth Circuit JNC – R. Lee Bennett of Orlando, LaVon W. Bracy of Orlando, R. David de Armas of Belle Isle, Valerie W. Evans of Orlando, Mario Romero of Orlando, and John T. Stemberger of Orlando. • 10 th C ircuit JNC – Deborah Lee Oates of Bartow, Judy Lee Brown of Sebring, Sylvia Blackmon-Roberts of Lakeland, John K. Stargel of Lakeland, G. Gregory King of Winter Haven, and Billy R. Ready of Auburndale. • 12 th C ircuit JNC – Gary L. Larsen of Sarasota, John L. “Jay” Crouse of Sarasota, J. Michael Hartenstine of Sarasota, Connie Mederos-Jacobs of Bradenton, Patrick K. Neal of Bradenton, and Marsha Nippert of Sarasota. • 14 th C ircuit JNC – John L. Fishel II, Julie A. Sombathy, William E. Miller, Marsha H. Lewis, Dixon R. McCloy, and Martha B. Blackmon-Milligan, all of Panama City. • 17th Circuit JNC – Walter R. Blake of Coral Springs, O’Neal Dozier of Pompano Beach, Davis W. “Bill” Duke of Ft. Lauderdale, Walter L. Morgan of Ft. Lauderdale, Georgina R. Pozzuoli of Weston, and William R. Scherer of Ft. Lauderdale. • 18 th C ircuit JNC – John R. McDonough of Orlando, Dixie N. Sansom of Cape Canaveral, Larry A. Dale of Sanford, Fernando M. Palacios of Melboune, Tiffany C. Loris of Palm Bay, and David W. Jackson of Cocoa. • 19 th C ircuit JNC – James L.S. Bowdish of Stuart, Nita G. Denton of Stuart, Linda B. Braswell of Stuart, Arlene V. Newson of Ft. Pierce, Thomas W. Lockwood of Wabasso, and Renee C. Marquis of Ft. Pierce. • 20th Circuit JNC – Darol H. M. Carr of Punta Gorda, Basil L. Bain of Naples, Stephany S. Carr of Naples, Harvey R. Elliott of Port Charlotte, Victoria M. Ho of Naples, and Mitchell T. “Ted” Randell of Ft. Myers. Under the old system, the Bar named three JNC members, the governor named three, and those six picked three public members. Under the new system, the governor directly appoints five JNC members, two of whom must be lawyers. He appoints the remaining four members from a list of three nominees for each vacancy submitted by The Florida Bar. The three previous Bar appointees on each JNC were allowed to continue serving under the new bill, but all other JNC members were dismissed, giving Bush six appointments to each panel. JNC members will continue to serve staggered terms.center_img Gov. Bush makes more JNC appointmentslast_img read more

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What’s a credit union to do in order to compete with those “B-words”?

first_imgThe question at the top of every CEOs mind: How can we ensure our survival into the future?  As we pore through every blog, article, and piece of research that we can get our hands on, we’re all looking for the same answer.  We’re directed to offer the best suite of financial services, have an online presence, “speak” to millennials, and offer the best rates.  We work diligently to be the best while our competitors – those 4-letter-word financial institutions – are doing the exact same.  To beat them, we need to do what credit unions do best: be our cooperative selves!  Thus my idea for the Financial Fun Fair was born.  To learn more about this innovative idea, check out my initial application and watch my application video therein.  This project will increase our membership by embracing the Cooperative Principles at a community level, bringing increased awareness of the Credit Union Difference!Cooperation: Among Cooperatives While many of the projects and ideas suggested to us are aimed at singular credit unions or internally at our employees, I am launching my project at a chapter level.  I don’t just want my credit union to survive; I want the Credit Union Movement as a whole to thrive. Henry Ford phrases it best when he says, “If everyone is moving forward together, then success takes care of itself.” While the “b-words” may do community service, you’d never see two or more of them partner up. This cooperation is our competitive edge. We need to embrace the cooperative mindset in order to bring the most value to the credit union industry as a whole, and that is exactly what my project does.Community: People Helping People continue reading » 11SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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FDA issues warning on raw-milk soft cheeses

first_img See also: Editor’s note: Based on a Food and Drug Administration news release, the original version of this story incorrectly listed Ranchero as one type of soft cheese that may be made from raw milk The FDA later issued a clarification saying that Ranchero is a trademark of the Cacique Co. of Industry, Calif., for a cheese made with pasteurized milk. Listeriosis, brucellosis, salmonellosis, and tuberculosis are among the illnesses the cheeses can spread, the agency said in a news release. Especially at risk are pregnant women, newborns, the elderly, and people with weakened immune systems. Mar 14 FDA news releasehttp://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/2005/ucm108420.htm Particularly hazardous are raw-milk soft cheeses from Mexico and Central American countries, the agency said. It recommended that consumers not eat any unripened, raw-milk soft cheeses from Mexico, Nicaragua, or Honduras. “Data show that they are often contaminated with pathogens,” the statement said. Mar 16, 2005 (CIDRAP News) – Soft cheeses made with raw milk can cause several serious infectious diseases, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warned this week. “Recently, cases of tuberculosis in New York City have been linked to consumption of queso fresco style cheeses, either imported from Mexico or consumed in Mexico, contaminated with Mycobacterium bovis,” the statement said. The agency also warned against eating raw-milk soft cheeses bought at flea markets or from door-to-door sellers or carried in luggage from Mexico, Nicaragua, or Honduras. Raw-milk soft cheese from any source carries some risk, officials added. Queso fresco–style cheeses, popular among Hispanics, include Queso Panela, Asadero, and Blanco, among other types, according to the FDA. They may be imported or produced in the United States.last_img read more

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Those who want to grow grow, and in Lika they put the dice together step by step

first_imgThe education is maintained by a renowned chef Hrvoje Zirojevic, chef of the Laganini restaurant in Palmižana, who has many years of experience, teaches at the Aspira College in Split, studying gastronomy, and at the Opatija Faculty of Management in Tourism and Hospitality. In March this year, he was named the best Croatian chef by the prestigious world gastronomic guide Gault & Millau, and he introduced the Lagnini restaurant to the prestigious category of the best Croatian restaurants. The aim of this culinary education is to exchange knowledge and experience about local products and recipes and about different methods of preparing dishes characteristic of the destination area of ​​Lika. IQM Destination Lika is a project of Integrated Quality Management in Lika destination which has been implemented since 2019 by Plitvice Lakes National Park, Feel IQM and Cluster Lika Destination whose goal is to improve the overall quality of the destination by connecting entities in the destination to provide guests with the best service.  The training was organized precisely because of the caterers, in order to make their offer even better, and thus the gastronomic offer of the entire destination of Lika, which ultimately results in improved quality of the entire tourist offer. Upon completion of the training, the chefs will acquire specific knowledge and recipes that they will be able to implement in practice, with an emphasis on indigenous Lika dishes. center_img Those who want to grow grow, and in Lika they put the dice together step by step. While some stagnate, others struggle and build their bright future. Of course, this is a long-term process, but it is important to clearly lay a sound foundation in the beginning. And it is in this that less developed tourist destinations must see their advantage and opportunity. As part of the implementation of the IQM destination Lika project in the Plitvice Lakes National Park, the training of chefs of catering establishments involved in the project has begun. The training lasts from January 20 to 24, 2020, and the organizers are the company Feel IQM and the Lika Destination Cluster.  last_img read more

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Take real action to stop school shootings

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion I worked in schools for 42 years, so I know a bit about schools, kids and everything education. Quite frankly, I really don’t care why the shootings are happening anymore. It could be gun-control laws, style of weapons, age restrictions, clip size, mental health or lousy parenting. To quote Rhett Butler, “Frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn” anymore.We need to stop the political rhetoric every time there’s a school shooting. The left runs to the need for gun control, while the right starts waving around the Constitution. They are both useless. No law is going to stop school shootings. If the laws against murder don’t work, it’s daft to think that a law about gun purchases is going to stop the carnage. We have developed a way to protect airports and sports arenas. We need to do the same thing with schools: Limit access doors to the schools; have metal detectors at all points of entry;  and have an armed staff member at all points of entry. These steps will deter potential shooters. Another piece of paper in Washington will not.Dr. John MetalloSlingerlands More from The Daily Gazette:Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?last_img read more

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Monster in the house: Monster.com parent takes all Chancery House

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Neighbors look after one another to combat COVID-19 in Central Java

first_imgThe community has regularly received lettuce, eggplant and pepper seeds after communicating its plans to the province’s food agency and has also been breeding catfish.Read also: Regional leaders call on everyone to play role in overcoming pandemicThe residents also initiated a drawing and coloring program to keep their children entertained during the pandemic.”Kids put their drawing and coloring papers in front of their houses and judges [selected from among the adults in the neighborhood] tour the neighborhood,” Qunut said. “We also prepared snack hampers and asked parents to give them to their children.”RW 5 is only one example of how neighbors are helping each other using the Jogo Tonggo approach in Central Java, which has fluctuated between the fifth and fourth hardest-hit province.“We encourage communities to embody their local values. They does not have to be alike and share the same [program] name in each area, but one might inspire another,” Governor Ganjar Pranowo said in an exclusive interview on Friday.Ganjar said his administration did not have sufficient funds and resources to impose PSBB measures for a long period of time, and hence had decided to empower communities at the grassroots level to adapt to the current situation.”Let’s put our trust in society. There is potential social power that has yet to be utilized there,” Ganjar said, adding that the enforcement of strict measures by authorities would instead create unnecessary fear among the residents.Doubts over the efficacy of the Jogo Tonggo program, however, remain as the number of COVID-19 cases in Central Java continues to rise, reaching 3,482 cases with 150 deaths as of Saturday, the fourth highest tally in the country.Read also: Indonesia’s latest official COVID-19 figuresGanjar said only 30 percent of the province’s 7,809 villages were actively reporting their Jogo Tonggo activities.“We actually have so many shortcomings. This [Jogo Tonggo program] is only reaching about 30 percent [of communities]. But, I’d say even a single inspiration [from the movement] would be very meaningful,” he said, adding that he would continue promoting videos of Jogo Tonggo activities via his social media accounts “to inspire” others.The province saw three areas with relatively high rates of new cases compared to other regions of Central Java, namely Semarang city, Magelang regency and Temanggung regency, according to Ganjar.“In these areas, local administrations have intensified contact tracing, rapid [antibody] testing and swab [polymerase chain reaction] testing,” he said.Central Java had also recorded a higher death rate among confirmed cases and patients under surveillance (PDPs), at 7.87 percent and 13.66 percent, respectively, as of Saturday, compared to East Java and Jakarta – the two provinces with the most cases.Read also: Semarang wedding party contributes to COVID-19 spikeBut Ganjar said Central Java has sufficient hospital capacity, adding that many of the deaths occurred in patients with comorbidities.He said his administration was now working to cut the time it took to receive test results, from 10 days to two days, to allow hospitals to better manage their patients and prioritize treatment for COVID-19 patients.“Those most vulnerable will get priority, which we hope will lower the fatality rate,” Ganjar said.Epidemiologist Riris Andono Ahmad from Gadjah Mada University said the effectiveness of COVID-19 social interventions did not largely depend on the nature of the approaches – whether they be voluntary like Jogo Tonggo or more mandatory like the PSBB.He said the results would vary between regions depending on the characteristics of the society, meaning efforts in certain provinces might yield different outcomes than if the same measures were implemented in Central Java, and vice versa.”What is important is whether it can motivate people to maintain distance between each other,” he said. “As long as the efforts are adjusted to local contexts, they could be effective. But society is a very dynamic system and sometimes things work but, at different times, they don’t. A periodic evaluation is highly needed.”Topics : Central Java, home to more than 30 million people, has chosen a different approach to handle the COVID-19 outbreak rather than imposing large-scale social restrictions (PSBB) like many other regions across Indonesia.Instead, it has come up with its own strategy dubbed Jogo Tonggo (neighbors looking after each other), a community movement program in which people collaborate to ensure people maintain physical distance, manage food supplies and help others in response to the pandemic. Residents of community unit RW 5 of Jomblang subdistrict in Candisari, Semarang, are among the Central Java communities that have been implementing Jogo Tonggo in the past few months.More than three-quarters of RW 5’s residents work in the informal sector, mostly as day laborers and street vendors. Since the coronavirus pandemic hit the province, 393 of the 539 families in RW 5 have been financially impacted, according to Mohamad Qunut, a Jogo Tonggo facilitator in RW 5.To help these families, neighbors built a hydroponic garden and started a collective lumbung pangan (food barn) at the RW 5 office.“We had no idea a resident had been planting hydroponic crops for a while, not until another resident came to me saying that he could probably assist and encourage others to do the same,” Qunut told The Jakarta Post on Saturday.last_img read more

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