Bahamas moves to prevent cholera spread

first_img Share Share 14 Views   no discussions HealthLifestyle Bahamas moves to prevent cholera spread by: – October 24, 2011 Tweetcenter_img Share Sharing is caring! Minister of Health Dr Hubert Minnis (BIS photo)NASSAU, Bahamas — Authorities in The Bahamas moved speedily to ensure there is no spread of cholera, after confirming that one illegal immigrant had the potentially deadly infection, Minister of Health Dr Hubert Minnis said on Friday.Minnis confirmed that the Carmichael Road Detention Centre was being sanitized and some of the immigrants who had been housed at the facility were given medication as a preventative measure.The others were repatriated, including the immigrant with the confirmed case of cholera, according to the minister.The Nassau Guardian reported yesterday that detainees at the detention centre were relocated to Her Majesty’s Prison. It was not clear how long they will be there.The immigrant who had cholera was aboard a vessel detained by the Royal Bahamas Defence Force in late September, Minnis said.“One was determined to be ill and cholera suspected. The individual is no longer in the country. [He was] treated, cured of cholera and subsequently deported. Because the individual would have been in certain facilities like the detention centre, we would have had to empty the centre and subsequently do the necessary anti-cholera treatment to the cure the place,” he said.Minnis said, “…from day one we had suspected one of the individuals had cholera.”The cholera test was sent to Trinidad and Tobago, which is the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO)-certified laboratory facility for the region.“Only that one individual to our knowledge had cholera and he was treated appropriately,” Minnis said.“At no time was he within the community, so the community would not have been at risk. Once we manage the facility according to international regulations… we would have no problem opening the facility.”He added that all of the detainees were screened and given prophylactic medication to ensure that there was no possibility for them to become infected.“All individuals on the vessel would have been given prophylactic treatment. The vessel would have undergone the same anti-cholera treatment as the detention centre.”He said he did not know how long it would take to treat the centre.When asked about the kind of devastation a cholera outbreak could have on The Bahamas, the minister gave an example of a case in Peru.“In 1992 there was a cholera case in Peru, one case, and Peru’s tourism industry suffered devastation,” he said. “It lost over $500 million. Cholera can be very devastating.”Cholera, which is normally easy to treat and can be prevented, can also be deadly. It is a bacterial infection that is spread through water and food (mainly shellfish).The infection caused a major crisis in Haiti over the past year. More than 420,000 people in and around Port-au-Prince were impacted during an outbreak in which more than 6,000 people died.Minnis noted that the government is focused on fighting illegal immigration, but cannot stop it.“Therefore, from time to time the country could possibly be at risk for introduction to cholera or other [ailments],” he said.Minnis stressed that every Bahamian has an obligation to report any vessels or illegals who try to enter The Bahamas.“Each and every citizen has a responsibility,” he said.“You don’t take chances when it comes to cholera.”By Travis Cartwright-CarrollNassau Guardian Staff Reporterlast_img read more

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‘Panache’ now open in downtown Greensburg

first_img?Greensburg, In. — Panache, at 121 East Main Street in downtown Greensburg is now open.Panache offers stylish plus size women’s apparel and accessories at affordable prices. The store is a relaxed and easy-going atmosphere to shop, and its patrons will enjoy top-notch customer service.For more information call 317-771-5988.last_img

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VP Mike Pence Visits Miami as UM tests COVID Vaccine

first_img“The COVID-19 pandemic is having a tremendous impact in South Florida and across the world,” said Dr. Susanne Doblecki-Lewis, an infectious disease expert at the University of Miami who will lead the initiative. “We are testing vaccines with the goal of finding a safe and effective way to halt the spread of the virus.” The clinical trials will test a vaccine developed by National Institutes of Health scientists and their collaborators at the biotechnology company ModernaTX Inc.Prospective volunteers for the study will need to be at least 18 years old. A news release said the school plans to use community outreach and mobile operations to recruit from a wide variety of demographics. To register to volunteer, you can sign up by clicking here“We are committed to engaging people who represent the range of residents impacted by COVID-19 in South Florida by gender, age, race, and ethnicity, as well as those who are particularly at-risk because of medical conditions,” said Doblecki-Lewis. “This is how we will help ensure that any vaccine that is developed will be relevant for those who could benefit most from it.”Participants are paid for their time and inconvenience during what is scheduled to be a three-month study. Vice President Mike Pence visits the University of Miami today to discuss a possible coronavirus breakthrough.Mike Pence will visit the University of Miami, where clinical trials are getting under way on a vaccine.About a thousand people will be part of a clinical trial involving a vaccine developed by Moderna. The university’s Miller School of Medicine is taking part in the “Phase 3” trial of the vaccine.Pence will take part in a roundtable discussion with school leaders and members of the Miller School of Medicine along with researchers on what could help in the ongoing battle: https://t.co/hpMa8fMdDq— NBC 6 South Florida (@nbc6) July 27, 2020last_img read more

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Atlético says 2 group members test positive for coronavirus

first_img August 9, 2020 Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditMADRID (AP) — Two members of Atlético Madrid’s group set to travel to Portugal for the Champions League quarterfinals tested positive for the coronavirus on Sunday — the first pandemic-related setback among clubs participating in the final stage of Europe’s top club competition.The last eight is scheduled to begin in Lisbon on Wednesday amid tight health safety protocols to prevent a coronavirus outbreak from derailing the competition’s finale. The semifinals and Aug. 23 final will also be played in Lisbon.Other clubs involved in the quarterfinals have not reported any positive tests among its players recently. Associated Press Atlético says 2 group members test positive for coronavirus The Spanish club did not name those who tested positive and did not say if a player was involved. It said both people who were infected had been isolated at their homes.Atlético, which was expected to travel to Lisbon on Monday, said it immediately informed health authorities in Spain and Portugal about the positive results, as well as UEFA and other soccer bodies in both countries.It said in a statement that the entire group that was set to travel will be tested again, and that the team’s schedule is being altered to allow the new tests.Atlético is set to face Leipzig on Thursday in the last eight.The quarterfinals start on Wednesday with Atalanta facing Paris Saint-Germain. The other one-game series will involve Barcelona vs. Bayern Munich on Friday and Manchester City vs. Lyon on Saturday. The matches will take place at two stadiums in Lisbon.Earlier this week Atlético had to cancel a friendly of its women’s team after a positive test within the group.Atlético said that, after the Spanish league season had ended, the club asked for all Spanish teams still involved in European competitions to keep voluntarily following the league’s health safety protocols. It said UEFA only required one negative test from each member of the group within 72 hours of the trip to Lisbon, but the team had been testing its members weekly and was still working with the health safety inspector assigned by the Spanish league.Atlético said a total of 93 people had been tested the day before the squad returned to training on July 26, and the first team and those in close contact with it were tested again last Sunday, with all results coming back negative.Atlético is seeking its first title in Europe’s most lucrative club competition. It lost the 2014 and 2016 Champions League finals to city rival Real Madrid. It was also runner-up in 1974, losing to Bayern Munich. Diego Simeone´s team was eliminated by Juventus in the round of 16 last season. ___ More AP soccer https://apnews.com/Soccer and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports___Tales Azzoni on Twitter: http://twitter.com/tazzonilast_img read more

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Mike Tyson still capable of knocking out any heavyweight – De La Hoya

first_imgBy Charles BrunMIKE Tyson is still capable of knocking out any heavyweight in the division at age 53, according to ‘Golden Boy’ Oscar De La Hoya. After watching a clip of the former heavyweight champion Tyson (50-6, 44 KOs) working out on the mitts, Dela Hoya predicted that he’d KO anyone in the division if he trains for 12 rounds.The video clip, by the way, went viral and is being talked abount by the entire boxing world. The speed, punching power, and the technique that Tyson showed during the brief clip went unrivaled by any of the current top heavyweights in boxing.Jeff Fenech, the old trainer for Mike Tyson, believes that he would knockout former WBC heavyweight champion Deontay Wilder in the first round if he worked hard and went through six weeks of training camp.Further, many people want to see Tyson make a comeback for at least one fight against Wilder. The fans believe that Tyson will knock Wilder (42-1-1, 41 KOs) out in the first two rounds.“I’m sure that if he trains for 12 rounds, right now, he’ll knock out any heavyweight,” said Dela Hoya about Mike Tyson to The Sun.It would be interesting to see how Tyson would do against one of the best heavyweights in the division if he went through a full training camp. Of course, it could prove challenging to get one of the top guys like Wilder, Fury, or Joshua to agree to take on the 53-year-old Tyson.There would be a tremendous backlash for one of them if they were to lose to the former heavyweight champion. It would be a lose-lose situation for any of those current top heavyweights to take on Tyson at this point because they won’t gain anything in facing him other than money.If they beat Tyson, then boxing fans will downplay their victory by saying, ‘You beat an old man.’ If they lose to Tyson, then it’s career over. The fans would never let Fury, Wilder, or Joshua forget that they lost to the 53-year-old Tyson.Unfortunately for Tyson, he’s in the same position ‘Big’ George Foreman was in when he launched a comeback in the late 1980s at the age of 40-years-old. (Boxing News)last_img read more

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Nigeria Avoids Brazil, Argentina, to Face Sweden, Japan and Colombia

first_imgFemi Solaja with Agency reportsAfrican champions Nigeria against all expectation avoided the likes of host, Brazil and another potential winner, Argentina to secure a fair draw as Coach Samson Siasia lads have been drawn against Sweden, Japan and Colombia in the Rio Olympics first round held yesterday in Brazil.Incidentally, both Sweden and Japan just like Nigeria will be in Brazil as continental champions.Sweden is the European tournament winners while Japan won the Asian version of the qualifiers. Colombia defeated USA in an intercontinental playoff to qualify for the Rio football showpiece.Nigeria will begin the quest for glory at the event on August 4 with the group match against Japan at the Amazonia Arena in Manus after Sweden and Colombia kick off the race in the group. Three days later, precisely August 7th, at same stadium, Nigeria will take on Colombia while the last group match will come up on August 10th against Sweden in Salvador at the Fonte Nova Arena.Nigeria’s Dream Team won a historic Olympic gold in 1996 and was beaten by Argentina in the gold medal match at Beijing 2008.Just like it happened four years ago, Nigeria’s female team failed to make the cut to the women’s football event of Rio2016.The Olympic Football Tournaments will have a total of 58 matches, with 32 for the men, and 26 for the women.Host Brazil will open their quest for gold medal feat in the men’s event with opening match against South Africa on August 4th at the Estadio Mane Garrincha in Brasilia while their women play China a day earlier at the Estadio Olimpico in Rio de Janeiro.RIO2016 DRAW MENGroup A: Brazil, South Africa; Iraq; DenmarkGroup B: Sweden; Colombia; Nigeria; JapanGroup C: Fiji; Korea Republic; Mexico; GermanyGroup D: Honduras, Algeria, Portugal, ArgentinaWOMENGroup E: Brazil, China, Sweden, RSAGroup G: USA, New Zealand, France, ColombiaGroup F: Canada, Australia, Zimbabwe, GermanyShare this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

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With new season pass, Syracuse looks to improve football student attendance

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on August 30, 2017 at 12:28 am Contact Matthew: mguti100@syr.edu | @MatthewGut21 As he grew older, John Lombardi found himself going to fewer Syracuse football games. He plays on the SU rugby team, and that schedule conflicted with football games. Although the junior paid $219 for football and men’s basketball season tickets the last two years, Lombardi no longer has a ticket plan. He said he will attend a couple of games in 2017, but now that he lives off campus, he has other expenses, such as housing, Wi-Fi and utilities, and he’d rather save money than lock into a ticket plan.Lombardi, a finance and supply chain double major, said he often left football games at halftime if the Orange was losing. A “rough” Wi-Fi connection and warmer temperatures — the Carrier Dome does not have air conditioning — further nudged him from buying tickets this year.“They’re fun to watch, but sometimes it’s tough watching your guys get rocked,” said Lombardi, who has watched SU go 4-8 both years he’s been on campus.This is exactly what athletic departments don’t want to hear. Across the country, they are grappling with declining student attendance. Many, Syracuse included, see filling student sections as a way to reverse the fact that NCAA average home football attendance has fallen seven of the last eight years since its peak in 2008. Even at schools with entrenched football traditions and national titles, there are a growing number of empty seats in the student section. It’s especially important for schools to attract students to games, experts said, because more engaged fans are likelier to become donors later in life.This fall marks the debut season of Syracuse’s new student pass, which unveiled in April. It is SU’s first adjustment to how students get tickets in at least 10 years, and an additional points system is set to launch later this semester, said Anthony Di Fino, Syracuse’s associate athletics director for business development.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe student pass operates for football, men’s and women’s basketball and lacrosse. There are four options for students. Three include a priority points element, which includes additional benefits that carry into a student’s life post-Syracuse. The cost ranges from $200 to $300, putting SU’s plan among the most expensive in the Atlantic Coast Conference.Emma Comtois | Digital Editor“When we look at football, one of our goals is to increase student attendance and overall attendance in the Dome,” John Wildhack, SU’s director of athletics, said in April. “The Dome can be one of the great home-field advantages in all of college football.”Not recently. While Syracuse men’s basketball attendance consistently ranks among the top in the nation — SU has placed fourth or better each season since 1981, the year after the Carrier Dome opened — football attendance has lagged. Syracuse football attendance is coming off of its worst two years in Dome history. Despite a new head coach, high-powered offense and a victory over a Top 25 team, SU football’s home attendance finished the 2016 season as the program’s second-worst for a single season.This is why, experts said, the quality of the product on the field is not the silver bullet to getting young crowds to the game. A winning team is easier to sell than a losing team, said Robert Malekoff, a lecturer at North Carolina’s Department of Exercise and Sport Science, but the experience matters most. He calls Wi-Fi a “drug,” in that students need it working well and he said that for many students, game day means tailgating, not necessarily football. College football games are growing longer, especially those played with no-huddle offenses, which doesn’t help keep kids in seats for the entirety of games.“You have to think more broadly in the other options kids have,” Malekoff said. “They can sit at home and watch 900 games at once on TV where there’s cheap beer and access to a bathroom right there.”Daily Orange File PhotoMalekoff added that there is no one-size-fits-all model for athletic departments because of the variables of competitiveness, location, demographics and tradition. He and Daniel Funk, a professor in Temple’s Sport and Recreation Management program, recommend departments combat declining attendance by asking students for feedback on what they like and don’t like about games. Additionally, both said more contests and giveaways geared toward students would help.Di Fino said this week that SU may test giveaways later in the season. They are considering T-shirt, hat and backpack giveaways.Establishing a link with young fans can pay dividends over the long haul in the form of donations. Ticket sales and donations accounted for 41 percent of total revenue at FBS schools in 2014, according to a 2015 NCAA report.With student attendance down, Funk said, some students might be less likely to become alumni donors.“It’s more than just the four years.” Funk said. “If you can’t make that connection with students early on, there might be some negative residuals.”One of Otto’s Army’s primary goals, president and SU junior Audra Linsner said, is to increase attendance at smaller-scale sporting events, such as field hockey, soccer and women’s basketball. Second on her list is beefing up football attendance. She said adding activities, giveaways as well as promotions to the exterior of the Dome, and the Quad, could draw more students.“Working with the athletic department, … we’re going to make the campus as football-inclined as possible,” Linsner said. “The main issue is the pregame events are not right on campus. Most students don’t go the quad before games.”Linsner fills the shoes of Johnny Oliver, who as president of Otto’s Army was close to creating a new ticket plan in 2016, under former director of athletics Mark Coyle. When Coyle left, the student ticket plan was put on hold until this spring. Linsner said she hopes to both bolster the plan when it gains an incentive-based points element and make it more affordable, though cost has not been a part of her discussions with SU Athletics. Di Fino suggested that students concerned with the cost of the season pass purchase individual tickets at the discounted student rate.During basketball season, SU graduate student Joey Sisti found it difficult to make 7 p.m. tipoff after a day of class. He’d rather go to a bar and drink with friends. During football season, he stopped going to games when his friends stopped going. He purchased student tickets for his freshman and sophomore years but has not had them since. A combination of “slow” Wi-Fi speeds and “uncomfortable” bleachers keeps him watching games at home.“I’d rather watch them on TV because if they’re losing we can turn them off and do something else,” Sisti said. “It’s adding up. What is that $220? I’d rather save that, put it elsewhere.” Commentslast_img read more

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Clay Helton’s past inspires his football acumen

first_imgFaith. Family. Football.That is the motto of USC’s team, promoted strongly by their leader, head coach Clay Helton. Helton assumed the head-coaching role two days after the Trojans’ convincing 40-21 win over UCLA on Nov. 28.The motto has since been embraced by the team and is emblazoned on black hoodies that can frequently be seen around campus.Helton said in an interview with the Daily Trojan that selling kids on the team’s motto is one of his biggest recruiting tools.The words that Helton now lives by were taught to him by the same man who gave him his start as a coach: his father, Kim Helton.“My dad taught me there’s not a lot of time out there to be able to do other things, so concern yourself with three things: Faith, family and football, and that’s what I believe in,” Helton said.His coaching career began immediately following graduation. Helton spent two years at Duke, one as a graduate assistant and one as the running backs coach in 1996 but then moved to his alma mater and the school his father coached at — University of Houston, where he was the running backs coach for three seasons.“It’s not too many times you get to work for your best friend in life and your hero and that’s what my dad is to me,” Helton said. “I’ve learned so many lessons from him, not only as a young guy, but as a coach, and now as a guy that’s 43 years old.”FaithReligion is a big part of the football culture at USC, and it can be witnessed every time the team runs out of the Coliseum on Saturday. They all head for the end zone where many players take a knee and take a moment to pray.Religion is in the locker room, on the field and in tattoos.“We believe that no matter what religion you believe in, if you want to practice your faith, practice your faith and we support you,” Helton said.FamilyThe two-faced second moniker holds especially true for Helton, whose coaching career has been so intricately tied to his family. Getting a start from his father gave Helton the opportunity to develop not just his knowledge of Xs and Os, but develop his character as well.“He’s taught me how to be a husband, a father, a football coach and a leader of men,” Helton said of his father. “I’m very blessed to have a guy that isn’t only my best friend but also happens to be a really good football coach too.”Helton said he still talks to his dad two or three times a week.Helton’s parents live in Florida acting as caretakers for his grandmother, who is in her 90s. They take an annual trip to visit their son’s colleges though, and now that Helton has hired on his brother, Tyson Helton, as quarterbacks and passing game coordinator, Helton is hoping that his parents will be able to spend more time in California.Tyson Helton also played for his father at Houston before becoming the special teams coach at Hawaii. Most recently, he was the offensive coordinator at Western Kentucky.“I’ve always known how talented a coach he is, but now to see it up close and personal is great,” Helton said. “To bring that dynamic to your football team, not only a guy that you love, but also an ultra-talented coach it makes you very proud as a head coach. I’m mad that he has more hair than me, and he’s a lot skinnier than me.”Helton has been able to surround himself with those he loves, no one more than his high school sweetheart, Angela Helton. Helton and his wife have quite the love story.Though Helton says he no longer looks the part, he was once the quarterback at Clements High in Sugar Land, Texas. Angela Helton was a member of the dance team that performed at the games.“I’ve been in love since I was 15, she figured it out at 17, and we’ve been in love ever since,” Helton said.Going into their 21st year of marriage, the Heltons have three kids of their own, including high school senior, Reid Helton, who is looking at USC as a possible college for next year.FootballAs spring football begins, Helton has his hands full implementing new concepts as well as incorporating freshman onto the team in what he expects to be a competition-filled spring season.“The beauty of spring ball is competition, and that’s where you establish yourself,” Helton said.  “Over the past six years, we’ve had 15 freshman All-Americans, so here it’s about stepping on that practice field and competing. It doesn’t matter if you’re a freshman or a senior.”Spring isn’t just about football though. Helton said the program tries to get the players together as much as possible to promote the family-to-football tie.“We believe in the family aspect of things and the brotherhood, and to have that you’ve got to be together,” Helton said.Helton cited bowling and movies as two team favorites as well as Friday night dinners at local restaurants on road games during the season.In his first full season as head coach, Helton has a lot to juggle between deciding starting lineups, preparing for a full schedule of tough opponents and keeping off-the-field drama to a minimum. For him though, it’s much simpler than that when you are able to focus on the things that matter most: Faith. Family. Football.last_img read more

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On hold: Fall athletes try to assess future

first_imgLast Updated: 21st August, 2020 07:18 IST On Hold: Fall Athletes Try To Assess Future Devin Meyrer has the same feelings as many athletes in conferences that have seen their fall seasons postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic. He understands why the decision was made, but he isn’t sure whether it will be feasible to conduct a season in the spring LIVE TV Devin Meyrer has the same feelings as many athletes in conferences that have seen their fall seasons postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic. He understands why the decision was made, but he isn’t sure whether it will be feasible to conduct a season in the spring.The University of Michigan distance runner participates in cross country in the fall, before shifting to indoor track in the winter and the outdoor season in the spring. For some athletes who do both cross country and track, some decisions might have to be made.“We have no idea of how the logistics will work, especially for those of us who compete all three seasons,” Meyrer said. “There are going to be schedule conflicts, but we’ll be ready for any variable.”College athletes who compete in Olympic sports during the fall say they figured their seasons were at risk well before the NCAA and some conferences announced postponements. They also say it was better to make this move in advance than having to shut things down in the middle of a season.Meyrer has been caught in both scenarios. He was running well last year and placed 16th at the NCAA Division I Cross Country meet, but saw his outdoor season canceled two weeks before it started. He also saw teammates not get to compete in the NCAA Indoor Championships, which were canceled after everyone arrived to compete.“For distance runners this means we have lost two consecutive seasons,” he said. “Spring was a shock to the system because everyone had to go home and you lose that team camaraderie. This is more like a slow burn. We were excited to show the work we had done since March even if the opportunity to race was being done in a controlled environment.”Dana Rettke and her Wisconsin volleyball team were well into preparations for another possible Final Four run when the Big Ten’s postponement announcement came on Aug. 11. However, she wasn’t shocked by the outcome because of the increase in COVID-19 cases in the Midwest during the summer.“The chances of having a season were decreasing. There was a bigger fear of knowing if there was going to be a second wave if we were already into the season,” she said.The senior middle blocker, who is the reigning Big Ten Female Athlete of the Year, is trying not to get too wrapped up in what a spring season might look like because too many unknowns remain. Her biggest concern is making sure she follows all the necessary protocols for the two classes she will have that won’t be online.Rettke also hopes they will get a chance to have a season after the Badgers advanced to the national championship game last season before losing to Stanford.“The recent practices honestly were some of the most fun I have had in the gym. Now we have an entire fall semester to prepare which will be beneficial,” Rettke said.While most teams in the Midwest had an opportunity to begin practicing, Stanford’s Catarina Macario and Southern California’s Marcus Longton had not even gotten that far. Local health regulations have restricted most California schools to just conditioning workouts.Macario is a senior forward at Stanford, which is the defending NCAA women’s soccer champion, while Longton is on USC’s water polo team. He is a sophomore driver on the Trojans, who reached the final last year.“As defending national champions we have to set and keep the tone that we will be here and ready to compete,” Macario said. “We will keep training as if things will play out in the spring. Hopefully by then schools and conferences will have figured out a safer way to compete and travel and do the things we used to before.”Another concern is what the field would look like during an NCAA tournament. If the Southeastern and Atlantic Coast conferences decide to compete in the fall, they would be ineligible to be in the tournament.Even if it wasn’t the usual field, Macario stressed that a national title would still be the goal.A spring men’s water polo season could also be compressed due to logistics. Not only would their season be going on at the same time as the women’s, it would also come in the midst of preparations for the rescheduled Tokyo Games, which are supposed to take place next summer.Four members of USC’s men’s team are training with the U.S. team, but the Olympic roster still isn’t set.“The coaches are working to have every player on their best training scenario,” Longton said. “Maybe some guys go compete with their old clubs. Whatever happens all my team is on board if there is any chance to have a season. Every athlete wants to compete.” FOLLOW US WATCH US LIVE Associated Press Television News center_img First Published: 21st August, 2020 07:18 IST COMMENT SUBSCRIBE TO US Written Bylast_img read more

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Meet Asanyah Davidson, fashion entrepreneur

first_imgCNW recently caught up with Asanyah Davidson a fashion designer/entrepreneur based in Miami, yet still calls Jamaica home.CNW: Tell us a little bit about yourself?Davidson: That’s a long one. From Clarendon, Jamaica. I took my first international flight on my own at 7, and I’ve been traveling ever since. I still call Jamaica home, and South Florida my base.  I love all things design related, not just fashion. I love to travel, good food and great conversation. I love design and the way a designer’s mind works. I spent several years in the industry in New York and after completing my graduate degree in London, I returned to the States and worked at Macy’s Florida Division as an assistant buyer. During that time, I also started teaching at Miami International University of Art & Design and Broward Community College while working on my own mini collections. I most recently took my love of teaching and knowledge of fashion to West Africa where I taught at schools in Lagos, Nigeria and Accra, Ghana. That year on the Continent allowed me to learn extensively about native techniques and the ever-popular Ankara fabrics. I love mentoring and sharing my passion for design with students. My areas of interest are education, global studies, design and fashion as communication. I have a M.A. Design Studies from Central Saint Martins London, England, B.S. International Trade and Marketing for the Fashion Industries from F.I.T., I had the chance to study abroad in Polimoda, Florence, Italy. I have a A.A.S Fashion Design from F.I.T., and I attend Design and Architecture Senior High.CNW: None of us can achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are?Davidson: First and foremost, my grandmother. I lost her very early in life, but she had a significant influence on me. The matriarch of our family, a talented seamstress, and a disciplined woman. In no order, my friends, who are all quite talented and exceptional in their own way and always provide support and encouraged me to challenge myself.  I have moved so many times, and as a result, I’ve collected a diverse group of Besties, and they’ve all helped me grow in one way or another. My cousins, who were like brothers and sisters growing up.  My mentors, men, and women who champion me when I’m not in the room. CNW: What has been the proudest moment in your career so far?Davidson: Becoming Chairperson of Miami Fashion Institute at Miami Dade College was a great moment but I’m most proud of the amazing faculty of the staff there, and I’m proud of what we’re building and the kind of opportunity we’re creating for our students. One of the goals this year was to get the students more involved in community events and 6 of our students created work to benefit Susan G. Komen which was really great. Not only because the gowns they made were beautiful but because it took the hard work of our faculty and staff to make it happen. I am most proud of how we work together to make our program a success.  CNW: Tell us about the work you did in West Africa…Davidson: Through past connections, I was able to find a college in Nigeria to teach fashion, while there I was able to travel to Morocco and South Africa between classes. I got to know the local culture in Lagos, make some amazing new friends and really enjoy the people there. It’s always interesting to compare cultures, there are more similarities than differences once you get down to it. That opportunity lead to another, and I was invited to teach in Ghana soon after. Ghana feels like an extension of Jamaica, the music, the people and the food felt so familiar, they love all things Jamaican, and I made more great friends. The students in both countries were amazing. The way they took the knowledge I shared and translated it into their own, their use of color and textiles is truly impressive, and I still order dresses from former students, in part to support them as designers and also to showcase the talent coming out of Africa. CNW: Must Read book?Davidson: Wow, I can name one of the most influential in my approach to life and my understanding of people, The Four Agreements by Don Miguel Ruiz. CNW: What is one thing people may be surprised to find out about you?Davidson: I’ve been boxing for about 8 years now. I love science and therefore Sci-fi. Vegan for 5 years in January 2019.last_img read more

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